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Full text of "Breeder and Sportsman (1906)"

RE! 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/bresports4849unse 



TOI.. XLVUI. No. 1. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 19C6. 




[JANUARY (i, 19(j<i 



$10 Payments Due February 1 P 19Q6 

ON YEARLINGS IN 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5 — $ 7000 Guaranteed 

Nothing More to Pay Before 1907. 

For Foals of Mares coverel In 1904. To trot or piC3 at two and throe years old. Entries closed October 15, 1904. Nothing 
More to Pay Before 1907, when your Foal can start in the T wo-Year-Old Division. Stakes divided as follows: $.'i2f>0 for 
Trotting Foals, $1750 f j- Pacing Foals, $800 to Nominators of Dams of Winners and $200 for Owners of Stallions. 

A Chance for Those Who Failed to Enter. 

Substitutions. A few of the or '£' na l nominators of Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes for Foals of 190u have ad vised 
us that, because of barrenness of the mare or death of the foal, they wish to dispose of their entries. 
If you own one or more whose dams you neglected tc name when ontries closed, send $22, with Color, Sex and Breeding of 
the Foal, on or before February 1st next, which covers payments to February 1, 1907, and the few substitutions to be dis- 
posed of will be awarded in the order in which remittances are received. Prompt attention will secure for you this rich 
engagement. 



E. P. HEALD, President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Sec'y, 36 Geary St., S. F. 



viCrT H E- H Oib <> 

VW^I Registered Trade Mark % 

*W SPAVIN CURE < 



Deposit Your 
lldle Funds 





Running Horse Owners 
and Trainers 

"Save-the-Horse" has proven absolutely- 
unfailing on Bucked Shins. One bottle will 
cure from five to twenty cases. For 
strained, injured and broken down tendons, 
it is marvelously effective. 



W. A. Itedtnond, Attorney, McGIU Building. 

Washington, D. C, December 27, 190-i. 

Troy Chemical Company, Hinghamtoc, New York. 

Gentleman— I Brat tried the remedy on a thoroughbred, which had bowed both tendons and which 
had beet lired once and blistered a number ot times, but every time he was trained one or ihe other 
of the legs would All. This happened three years In succession. Last Spring I bought a bottle of 
"Save-the-H jrse," and used It according to directions wtih the result that he started 7 times, at all 
distances In uly last, and won 3 times second 8 times and third once— an excellent record — and he 
appears to be perfectly sound to day, and will be raced next monlh. I am firmly convinced without 
your remedy be would not have been worth a dollar as a race horse. 

I hive a roadster which stepped In a hole at pasture aid wrenched a hind ankle— so badly that 
he could not put his foot on the ground. I was advised to sbo-t him, as It was claimed that be had 
Injured his hip. Instead. I blistered him and he became servlceably sound, but limped at every step. 
Upon close examination I found a growth between the coronary band and the ankle which developed 
into ring bone. I used one bottle of "Save the Horse" on the growth, and it entirely disappeared. 
He has not taken a lame step since. 

Knowing Hie value of the remedy I do not hesltatoto recommend it to all horse owners of my 
acquaintance. Very truly. 

W. A. REDMOND. 



$5.00 



The Are iron is uncertain; blistering is less effective, and both necessitate laying 
up the horse from four weeks to two months; mercurial and poisonous compounds 
produce irreparable injury. "Save-the-Horse" eliminates all these factor?. 

POSITIVELY AND PERMANENTLY CURES 

Bone and Bog Spavin, Ringbone (exce-pt Low Ringbone), Curb, Thorough pin, Splint, 
Capped Hock, Shoe Boil, Wind puff, Weak and Sprained Tendonsand all Lam3ness. 
Horse can be worked as usual, it cures witbour scar, blemish or loss of hair. 

Per bottle, written guarantee with every bottle, constructed solely to 
satisfy and protect you fully. We know positively "Save-the-Horse ' 
will absolutely and permanently cure, and for that reason guarantee 
is made all your way. The need of second bottle is improbable except in rarest 
cases. Send for copy of guarantee and booklet. All druggists and dealers or 
sent exprass prepaid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, BINGHAMPTON, NEW YORK, SBSfy. 

D. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St , San Francisco. 

FAIRBANKS, MORSE &CO. 

STANDARD SCALES. RAILWAY SUPPLIES. 
GASOLINE ENGINES, STEAM PUMPS, ETC. 

Have Removed ! 

From 168-174: First Street, to 

Corner Natoma, between Mission and Howard Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



VICTOR VERILHAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. MoGRATH 

Manager 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Cor. of Drove and Kaker Streets, Just at the Panhandle Kntrauce to Golden Mate Park 

(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devlsadero Street Cars) 

Best located and healthiest Stable In San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand for 
sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exeroise park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladles can go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobiles 

or cars. 



WITH THE 



Central TrustCompany 
of California 

12 Montgomery St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sum 
large or small. 

INTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNUALLY 

3 1-4 on Ordinary Savings 
3 6-10% on Term Savings 

■end for Booklet, 
•'THE SURE WAY To WIALTH." 



McMURRAY 

4£ 



POI 



Perfect 
Light 
Great 
Easy 



NTS! 

Construction, 
Weights, 
Strength, 
Running, 
and LOW PRICES, 

McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING^CARTS 

STAN DARD THE WORLD OVER 

«S»Address for printed matter and prices 

W. J. KENNEY 

531 Valencia St., San Franclaco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

( CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST 
^ Co., oorner California and Mon'gemery Sts — 
For the six months ending December 31. 190ft, 
dividends have been declared on the deposits in 
the savings department of this company as fol- 
lows: On term deposits at the rate of 3 6 10 per 
cent per annum, aod on ordinary deposits at the 
rate of 8M per cent per annum, free of taxes and 
payable on and after Tuesday January 2, 1906. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 



RACING! 




New GaJiforDia Jockey CI 
OAKLAND TRACK 

Six or More Races Each Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE 

RACES COMMENCE AT 3 P.M. SHARP 

o F i 0r r , Speclal Tr » lns stopping at the Tracli take 
S P. Ferry, foot of Market Street— leave at II 
thereafter every twenty mlnuies. Nosnnking in 
last two cars, which are reserved for ladies and 
their escorts 

Returning, trains leave Track after tirth and 
last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



PHENOL S0DIQ0E 

lioals 

SORES, CUTS 
and BITES 




i 

PHENOL SODiaUE 



jwj^^OlSEASES OF ANIMALS ^ ***** 



^CE BROTHERS * 

E LPHIA 



Man and Beast, 

Keep Handy for 
Accidents. 

Cures 

MANCE & SCRATCHES 
on Dogs. 

For Sale 
Ity All Druggists. 

Recomm naed by this 
publicat'on. 



HANiE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA. 

THE HORSEMAN'S HANDBOOK 

CONTENTS: 

CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF STALLIONS —The Stall l*d- 
dock —Food— Diseases Exercise— Grooming 
—Serving Males— Amount of Service. 

CARS AND MANAGEMENT OF BR000 MARES-Gelting Mali's 
in Foal —Care During Pregnancy- Abortion— 
Foaling— Time \\ lieu Man' is Due— In Seasou 
Again - Weaning Colt. 

BREAKING AND DEVELOPING OF COLTS— ( ai 6 of Coll Ed- 
ucating — Feeding — Care of (irouing Keel — 
Creaking to Drive- Developing, Shoeing and 
Hooting. 

MAVAGEMENT OF CAMPAIGNERS— 1 low to Keep the Kaee 
Horse in < londltlOD and Keyed I'p for a Race. 

CAHE OF THE FEET— Hooting and Shoeing - Conner's 
and Berry's Views. 

CARE OF THE HORSE IN SICKNESS— Some Brief, Simple 
Utiles and Remedies. 

GAITING AND BALANCING-Correetion of Faulty (iails, 

ANIMAL TAMING AND TRAINING— Methods Employed by 
(ienlry in In ci coining Wild Instincts of tlib 
Horse and Teaching II mi to I. cam. 
STATISTICS -Championship lieeordsof every class 
Leading sires of-'::;n speed- Time ol Fastest 
Miles by Quarters— List of High Price, i Horses 
— 1.1*1 ol Horse Associations and Register* 
l ist of Morse Journals l ist of Hooks on the 
Horse— Period of Gestation Table, etc. 
AMERICAN TROTTING RULES The Complete Holes gov- 
erning Harness Racing with Index, < Itlidally 
Signed by Secretary W. II. Knight. 
USEFUL INFORMATION If ules for Admission to Stand- 
ard Registers Rules for Laying out Tracks- 
Treatment of Hone's Teeth— How to (Iroom a 
Horse— A bout Clipping Horses— To Start a 
Hilky Horse Where to Huy Specialties for 
Horsemen, etc. 

D g lrr ! Paper Cover SOc 
r»ni*»B. ( Leatherette Cover 91 

Address BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

36 CEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAl. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, tul Mont 
gomery Street, corner of Sutter, has declared 
a dividend for the term ending December. 'tl, 1906, 
at the rate of three and one-balf (8' 2 ) percent 
per annum, on all deposits, free of taxes, and pay 
able on and after January 'i. 1HIH!. Dividends nut 
called for are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as principal. 

EDWIN BONNELL, Cashier. 



January 6 I9t6j <frttv $VStfosV Uttb &p&Vt*n\Cin 3 

THE WEEKLY Ship direct to the Oregon State Fair at Salem, while iel Lambert, and his dam was Maud, a daughter of 

BDIjIIPTVEI'D A Am C DAD TC M A M "" ,st ' Wh ° wantea 10 take in ""' smaller meetings Daniel Lambert, and his graridam Columbia bj Co 

DtxCjCjUShlX J±aU O rUH 1 10 IVl ii IN during September and October In California would lum,,us - s " n " r Black Hawk r,. He was a bay tiors 

P W KELLEY PaoPanrro*. " aVe °PPOrtun«ties at Marysville, Salinas. Holllster. W,th a daSh * whlte in »»» faceand foa.ed in 1883. 

. CJkiah, Concord, and many other places where the ARIZONA TERRITORIAL FAIR 
^* purses range from $400 to $100. There can be a 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. Z^^jTZT^^^!^-^ JSrJSfSL ^^SSSi^J^ 

z i8ine person " eacB of the towns mentioned 10 take ^SZZSJT££^^ ^ 

36 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO matt6r '" hSnd an ° StaH WOrk "" the same " IM " ix ,lmi "~ Christmas week. The fair was a big 

v ' ' — o success and the racing first ,-iass in everj particular. 

P. O. BOX 447. AMONG THE VISITORS to the office of the Breeder The resulta of harness races wore as follows: 

f elephonb: Black 586. and Sportsman this week was Mr. C. R. Bentley, vice- Trotting, 2:27 class f purse f^OO 

^ president and manager of the corporation whic h pub- .Jessie Mac . , , , 

Term,-One*ear«3. S.x Month, ,1.75 Three Months 81 "f '""""^ tr0ttln ^ h ° rSe i»»>»>« "™e Horse «* •"* 

strictly in advance. Worm " '"' Buff ' x '« v "' k ' Mr ' Bentley is also g» £rnett » 3 2 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered st '" Hal '- v " f «*« Buffalo Driving Club, an organization Time-i-zl^ 'zize^," 2:21% " " 

letter addressed to F. W. Kklley, 36 Geary St., San Francisco, that gives one of the best of the Grand Circuit meet- Trotting 2 : 1 1 class: purse $40n 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and m ^ s every year Mr. Bentley is making a Hying trip Zombowyette 2 2 111 

address not necessarily for publication, but as a private guar- ,,, C aliforn:a, but has found time to visit Los An- Boralma's Brother 1 L 2 2 3 

antee or good iaun. • Leunmetta o o o •> ., 

— S "'" S ' Plea *anton, Santa Rosa and other important Tin,,- 2.1,.,. 2.',o.. 7 I,;-, • ',„" 3 2 

San Francisco Saturdav Tanuarv 6 1606 r, '"""' S ' ! ""' ta enjoyine llis visit ' He is a Pacing, 2:13 class; purse $400. 

ban Francisco, &aturaay, January 0, 1900 strong advocate of the three-heat plan for all harness Seldon Wilkes , , , 

races, holding that the old three-in-five system is N ictor Platte 2 2 

CALIFORNIA STAKE PAYMENTS DUE IN 1905. n °t adapted to modern racing where heats are trotted norenc^ Wilton '.' ! i I \ 

and paced below 2:15. That his opinions are shared Time— 2:12% 2:15V '2*15% 

Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes. by the majority of owners and trainers who race on Second Day. 

(Payments should be made to F. W. Kelley, secre- the Grand Circuit is evident by their published state- Pacing, free for all, purse $1000. Zolock won the 

tary, 36 Geary street. San Francisco.) t . , journals Mr Bentlev states that r "' St a " d fastest heat in 2 -°"- Hazel Patch took the 

Stake No. 3. $6000, foals of 1903— $10 due April 1, . journals, mi. uenuey states that npxt thn?e , n ,. 08 2:07%j and 2 . 11% Custer by 

1906. and starting payment of $50 on three-year-old Buffalo will be in line as usual this year with a pro- Sidney Dillon, was third, and Daeda lion "fourth", 

trotters and $35 on three-year-old pacers ten days be- gram of large purses and stakes and hopes to hold The 2:22 pace was won, by W. C. Greene's Hillings, 

fore the meeting. the banner meeting of its history. Third Day. 

Stake Xo. 4. $6000, foals of 1904— $10 due March 1. Pacing, special, purse $400. 

1906, and starting payment of $35 on two-year-old Fearnoi, by Lynmont 1 1 i 

trotters and $25 on two-year-old pacers ten days be- A $10 PAYMENT IS DUE on the first of next month Billy A fi 2 2 

fore the meeting. on all yearlings entered in the Pacific Breeders' Futur- Byron Laco by Lovelace 2 6 5 

Stake No 5, $7000, foals of 1905-$10 due February jty stakes No 5 _ for foa , g Qf ^ ^ Monkey Mac 3 3 3 

1, 1906. Surprise 4 4 4 

Stake No. 6. $7000, foals of 1906— $5 due May 1, SUaranteed to be worth $7000 and will probably be C ol. Greene I 5 6 

1906, and $5 due October 1. 1906. worth much more, as there were 388 original entries. Time— 2:14%, 2:14*4, 2:1314. 

Stanford Stake. Remember, it is for the foals of 1905. which are now Trotting, 2:24 class; purse $400. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- yearIIngSi and wnen tnis pnyment of , 10 is made Boralma's Brother 1 , , 

retary. Sacramento.) Helen Dare, by Zombro "> 3 2 

Stanford Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— $10 due June there 15 nothlI 'S '™« to pay until 1907. Keep your Leunmetta 3 2 3 

1, 1906, and starting payment of $20 ten days before co 'ts paid up in all stakes in which they are entered Billy H 4 4 4 

State Fair opens. This is the last chance to substitute in this stake. Time— 2 : 17, 2: 16Y2, 2 : 16M>. 

Stanford Stake of 1907. foals of 1904-$10 due June If yolll . mare faUed to foa , jn lg05 or the fQa , djed Fourth Day. 

1. 1906. • t . , • Pacing, 2:09 class; purse $400 

Occident Stake. you can name another foal on February 1st without stranger O , , 1 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- regard to ownership, but not after that date. A few Daedaiion 222 

**retary, Sacramento.) of those owning foals of 1905 that were not entered Seldon Wilkes 3 3 3 

Occident Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— Starting pay- in this stake can secure substitutions by applying to Byron Lace 4 4 4 

ment of $50 due 30 days before the race. „ . „ ,, „„ _ . Time — 2:09'A 2.10V> 2-10Vi 

—o Secretary Kelley, 36 Geary street, on or before Feb- Pacin&> two-year-olds;" half mile 

THE POSSIBILITIES OF HARNESS RACING in r uary 1st. The cost of these substitutions is $22 each, Pickels j , , 

California during the present year are far beyond the which amount is paid back to the original nominator. Gipsy Queen 2 2 

expectations of a majority of horsemen, for could Winnie ! "* ' 

there be, by some means not yet discovered, a little Mr - STERLING R. HOLT, owner of the Maywood ' Time— 1:44 1-25 i'22 4 4 4 

enthusiasm and energy infused into the veins of the Stock Farm, near Indianapolis, home of Sidney Dillon, Fifth Day. 

managers of the many excellent mile tracks in this is making a short visit to California He spent Thurs- Pacing, three-year-olds— Helena Morgan won third. 
State, a circuit could be arranged that would attract da >' of tllis week at the Santa Rosa Stock Farm, '° wt *L and fifth. Billings won first and second. Bli- 
the patronage of horse owners and the public and wnere Proprietor Frank Turner showed him over ^y^W^'* T "' le ' 2:H% ' 2:14,/ *- 2:15 . 
result in meetings that would be profitable to the twenty head of young Sidney Dillons that confirmed The free-for-all trot resulted: Boralma's Brother 
associations and the horsemen. The start of the Cali- Mr - Holt in his belief that he owns the greatest sire won first, third and fourth heats. Briney K. won 
fornia circuit this year will be at Los Angeles, where of s P eed thf? world has yet seen. Sidney Dillon's "^^art**' Time ' 2 ' 12,/4 ' 2 : 14 ' 4 ' 2: 13V4 ' 2: 16y *' ° nl - v 
there are as many game and enthusiastic horsemen book was fiIled « a st year and many mares were turned ^he two-year-old trot was won by George S Otto 
as can be found in any city of the same size in the auav - after he had returned to his owner more than Sarony, Oakes Murphy, Rachella and Willie Amber, 
United States. The Los Angeles Harness Horse As- his Purchase price. This year his fee will be increased finishing in the order named, 
sociation gave two high class meetings last year, which Dut the bo °l<ings are already so numerous that the , Sixth Day. 

did not pay a financial profit but, nothing daunted, limit wU1 ,)e reached early fn the season. Paul^Kelly (2^*! . I i 1 4 

they are ready to open the circuit again in June this ^ Fearnot 9 9 3 1 2 

year, and have already so announced. From Los ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. Billy A 3 4 2 3 1 

»„ , 1. „ D. C. T. — The chestnut filly, Nancv Starr, was hied Seldon Wilkes .... 4 9 1 n o 

Angeles norsemen could make short shipments to San ., f -o„, n . J "r„ . ' eu „ ,1,, ' '' 4 A ' - J 

at Palo Alto but toaled the property of Monroe Salis- Time— 2:15%, 2:17, 2:13%, 2:13'A 2' 14% 

Bernardino and Santa Ana if meetings were given bury. At the sale of colts, fillies and brood mares Pacing, 2:22 class; purse $400. 

in those towns. Coming north, Fresno would prob- from Palo Alto Farm, held at the salesyard of Fred Surprise 3 1 1 3 f 

ably be the next point on the circuit. It has an H - Chase & Co., January 14th, 1904, a four-year old Victor Platte 1 2 2 1 3 

excellent mile track, is a prosperous city of 25,000 bay fllly by Dexter Prince, out of Lady Agnes bv ■ ■ ■ 2 3 3 2 2 

. , , . „.,„,, Electioneer, was knocked clown to Monroe Salisbury Florence Wilton 5 ,| r 

Inhabitants, and a horse center. The Breeders' Asso- fnr .99^ rp hQ fi11 „ _„„ . . „. , . ort " B " u »* Sul i Ivan . ,. 

lor $izt>. 1 he filly was in foal to Mendocino at the ^ u "i^<"i 1 chs 

ciation has held two successful meetings at Fresno, time. We understand she foaled a chestnut filly a T '""' - :Ifi, '2. 2:17%. 2:20. 2.22, 2:22%. 

and a local association could do even better. From few months later, which was called Nancy Starr. As Pacing. 2:03 class; purse $500. 

Fresno it is not a far cry to Stockton, which has been to tne breeding it is correctly stated in the catalogue, "olm-'k Pat ° h / 1 } 

off the racing map for a few years, but could be D v „ . ~ '~ „. Time— ^ oVu, "V-nVv 9'iiii " 

«*L ^ * mt , E. P. Y. H., Arroyo Grande. — We cannot find either " m< -' 0j ^' ^-«o%. 2..11%. 

made one of the best. Then should come Pleasanton, tne 8talllon or tne mal . e you name r eg ist ered in the , ~ °~ 

-the real horse center of California, where the first American Stud Book. If you can give sire and dam American bred trotters have finish,,! first and see- 
two-minute trotter was developed and the first of each, we will be able to tell you whether they are " the ann ual race for the championship of 
two-minute pacer is now kept in the stud. Pleasan- thoroughbreds and en titled to registration as such. S^enT im! Swing .".TltatT the' 

ton, if her people would all pull together, could give w ,„ «„j ,, „, . „, . with the best time made: 

Wm. Mead, Santa Maria.— Flaeon is a chestnut iBoi;_o nn (r„,.i 

a meeting that would be second to none. From Pleas- horse foale( j 1895, and was bred by August Belmont. 1896— Mattie II ■ 

anton the line of march would be to San Jose, where He is by imported Rayon d'Or. dam Flavia by imp j B rava /[o 2:1 - 

one of the finest tracks in the world Is located and st - Blaise. He won a five furlong race as a four- 1898— Que Allen Ji7i£ 

where a great meeting could he given every year under 1899— ,Que Allen 2:08</, 

proper management. The next place on the circuit jj_ u KllioU , Mendocino, Cal.-Flit Madison is reg- !Jo!-Ath!nio f\l " 

should be Santa Rosa, the birthplace of Lou DMlon istered in Volume 15, American Trotting Register. 1 902— Greenbrino .' 210 

and the location of the celebrated Santa Rosa Stock She is a bay mare foaled 1899, sired by James Madi- 1903— Wig- Wag .'" 213"/ 

Farm, which has as fine and well appointed a race son 17,909, dam Clear the Way by Steinway 1S08, 1 904— Contralto . 1*11* 

track as can be found on the Pacific Slope. The TlTlJ'C^'T X Bu t csln * er 2656 ' thi ^ "OS-Axworthy . .'.'.tit** 

Rachael by Wayland Forest, etc. She was bred by , n 

Santa Rosa meeting over, Woodland would be the John F . Boyd , Qakwood Park Stock Farm. Danville, Paul D. Kelly 2:27ihe champion yearling pacer 
next racing point, and whenever Woodland announces Cal. that took his ,. ecord ln 1904 started again8t a ,' ot Qf 

a meeting every California horseman arranges to be 1 aged pacers at Phoenix, Arizona, last week in the 

there. After the Woodland meeting the State Fair W ' B " Campbell, Cal.— California Lambert's record 2:17 pace. The two-year-old was dead game and 

would be the center of attraction and then those de- ! S 2 ' 27 ' Hi * reeister numb er Is 10.936. He was bred won two heats in 2:15% and 2.17, which gave him 
oum oe rne center ot attraction, and tnen those ue jn Vermont> and owned by tne , ate L v shlppee of tne race> although Kea rnot, Billy A. and Seldon 

sirous of racing on the North Pacific Circuit could Stockton. His sire was Ben Franklin, a son of Dan- Wilkes each took a heat In faster time 



4: 



(the gxttbev rm& gftMntf^mcro 



[January ( ; , 1900 



ANOTHER CLAIMANT. 

In last week's Breeder & Sportsman appeared an 
item in which it was stated that Mr. Gus Lindauer. 
of this city, believed his trotter. Homeway 2:14%, was 
the fastest fifteen-year-old trotter. We have re- 
ceived a letter from Mr. T. H. rogarty of Bakersfield, 
owner of "the litle blue horse." Richmond Chief 2 11, 
who state? that his horse is entitled to the crown in 
this case as he won his record in the fall of 1912 
when he was past fifteen years of age. Richmon.l 
Chief was foaled in June 1887. and in the fall of 1902 
started in five races, winning three and being second 
in the other two. He met and defeated such horses as 
Alta Vela 2:liy 4 . Cozad 2:11%, Vic Schillar 2.11% 
and others. He made his record at Fresno October 
2d. The .race was a hot one from start to finsh of the 
four heats. Richmond Chief won the first and sec- 
ond heats in 2:11% and 2:11. Cozad just beat him the 
third in 2:11% and then Richmond Chief won the 
fourth in 2:12. 

We know Mr. Lindauer. owner of Homeway 2:14%, 
will cheerfully acknowledge that Richmond Chief has 
his horse badly beaten for the fifteen-year-old record, 
but as his trainer, Dan Misner, said the only way to 
find out whether Homeway was entitled to the record 
or not was to claim it. knowing that if the owner of 
the fifteen-year-old champion was alive he would 
make the horse's presence and title known. 

Richmond Chief will soon be nineteen years old, 
but he is still a great trotter. He would have been 
campaigned last year in his eighteen-year-old form 
had there been a 2:11 class for trotters. Mr. Fogarty 
worked him miles over the Bakersfield track last year 
in 2:19%. and all horsemen know that track is from 
five to seven seconds slow. Until some other county 
is heard from Mr. Fogarty is certainly justified in 
claiming the title of champion fifteen-year-old trot- 
ting stallion for his horse Richmond Chief whose rec- 
ord was made in the second heat of a winning race. 

GOOD PURSES AT BUTTE. 



Editor Breeder and Sportsman — At a meeting of 
the directors of the Butte Racing and Fair Associa- 
tion it was decided to give a two weeks' race meet- 
ing in Butte this coming summer. The meeting, ac- 
cording to present arrangements, will take place in 
the early part of August, and a circuit is now being 
formed in the state so that horses can go from one- 
town to the other without losing more than one or 
two days, and the towns will be arranged so as to 
make the shipments as short as possible. 

Butte will offer six stakes of one thousand dollars 
apiece and none of the harness races will be for a 
purse of less than five hundred dollars. The com- 
plete announcement will follow later, in all proba- 
bility in the form of a circuit announcement, which 
will be arranged at a meeting of the secretaries of 
the different Racing and Fair Associations in the 
state to be held January 5th. 

This meeting will not be exclusively a harness 
meeting, as two running events will be placed on the 
program each day. Great enthusiasm is being shown 
along harness lines throughout the state, and the 
Montana circuit promises to be one of the best of 
the western circuits this coming year. Mr. W. A. 
Clark, Jr.. who is president of our Butte Racing As- 
sociation, has promised to bring a number of his 
horses to Montana this year, and in probability a 
great number of other good horses will be brought 
in from the outside. Respectfully yours, 

A. D. GALBRAITH. Secretary. 

NEW TRACK AT EXETER. 

Visalia, Jan. 1, 1906. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman — It is my pleasure 
to chronicle what is to me a happy new year mes- 
sage. The citizens of the prosperous little citrus 
town of Exeter, located on the Porterville branch of 
the Southern Pacific Railroad, ten miles east of Vi- 
salia, are organizing themselves into an agricultural 
association for the purpose of holding an annual fair 
and race meeting. An attorney has been employed 
to make an application for a ten thousand dollar cor- 
poration permit, money has been collected and a 40- 
acre tract of land purchased and a stockholders' 
meeting is called for Wednesday to elect a perma- 
nent set of officers. A regulation half mile track will 
be built at once. The soil of this tract of land is of 
uniform texture of tough yellow clay that will not 
cup or break away and a strenuous effort will be 
made to make it the safest and fastest half mile track 
on the coast. A competent civil engineer will be in 
constant charge during its construction, and every 
care taken that a uiform and systematic blending to- 
gether of the turns and stretches in the grading are 
made to overcome a fault so commonly found in the 
construction of half mile tracks. 

J. BROLLIAR. 

A late Lexington, Ky., dispatch says that Dan Patch 
is to have a handsome silver cup for breaking the 
world's record over the Lexington track last fall. 
The cup is one of the finest ever given by the associa- 
tion in honor of a performance. Sitting on an ebony 
base it stands about twenty-three inches tall, and on 
one-side is engraved the following: ' Kentucky Trot- 
ting Horse Breeders' Association to Dan Patch, 
world's champion pacer, 1:55%, Lexington, Ky.. Oc- 
tober 7, 1905." The cup has been sent to Mr. W. W. 
Savage. Minneapolis, Minn., owner of the great pacer. 
y_o 

The North Pacific Fair Association, an organiza- 
tion of all the principal fair and racing associations 
in the Northwest, will hold a meeting at Portland, 
Oregon, next Wednesday at which time dates will be 
arranged for the North Pacific Circuit of 1906. 



NEWS FROM DENVER. 

Racing men at Denver have been considerably exer- 
cised over reports that the Western Jockey Club and 
the American Turf Association, the rival running 
horse organizations, were trying to secure Overland 
Park and track. Negotiations were entered into 
by C. John Condon of Chicago through Ed Chase of 
Denver for the purchase of i iverland Park, which 
belongs to Henry R. Wokott. brother of the late 
Senator Edw ard < >. Wokott. Henry Hanington who 
Is the Denver agent for the Wolcott properties, 
placed a price of $150,000 on the plant, which is more 
than either Mr. Condon or the agents of the Ameri- 
can Turf Association care to pay for breaking into 
a doubtful country. So just at this time the out- 
look is that the Overland Park will remain in the 
hand- that have handled it for several years. What 
had stirred up harness rac ing men was that the run- 
ning horse associations had stated that they pur- 
1 osed using the track tor running meetings only. Had 
they secured possession the trotters would have been 
left clear out in the cold. 

At that there is some doubt concerning what man- 
agement will be in control of overand Park during 
the coming summer. For the past four years racing 
has been conducted by a Denver Overland Racing As- 
soc i.etion, of which E. A. Colburn is president and G. 
A. Wahlgreen secretary. The owner of the park had 
advanced the rental from $6000 to $7500. which is 
greater, the secretary thinks than his association can 
afford to pay. Kxperience has shown that Denver will 
spend only about so muc h each year on lacing., and 
that amount is not enough to warrant the renting of 
the park at the figure asked. Certain other parties are 
figuring on giving racing, and have asked the agent 
of (iverland not to make agreements with any until 
they are ready to state whether they will pay the 
higher rental demanded. If they decline to accept 
the terms, the racing will likely be in the same hands 
as during the past few years. 

Another matter that has entered into calculations 
for the June meeting has been the attitude of one of 
the judges on the district bench in Denver County. 
Though he has been a judge for almost two full 
terms, he had not discovered that he could interfere 
with gambling, or the saloons until it became al- 
most time for his third effort for election. During 
the past two months he has stirred up all kinds of 
trouble in Denver. It is even hinted that he will 
carry his campaign for re-election so far that he w ill 
prevent pool selling at the track next summer. If he 
does take that stand, with the power that he can in- 
voke to carry out his orders, racing may be doomed. 
Better things are hoped for, as the sentiment of the 
community has been several times shown to be 
strongly in favor of allowing racing to be conducted 
without interference. 

J. F. Mc-Guire. driver for G. H. Estabrook, has given 
Rightway. full brother to Winfield Stratton 2:05%, a 
c are ful working this fall, with the intention of mak- 
ing him the successor of his famous brother when the 
•grasshopper pacer" shall be ready to retire. Last 
week he sent Rightway a half mile in 1:07. The track 
was not at its best, being hard and dry. Mr. McGuire 
is very much pleased with the improvement shown 
by the youngster. 

During the early part of last month a number of 
the colts from the Gumaer stock farm, near Florence, 
were sold at auction in Denver. Most of the colts 
sold were youngsters sired by Saraway and Rex Den- 
mark, Jr. The foals of 1904 brought prices ranging 
from $80 to $100, and those of 1903 from $100 to $400. 
The Saraway colts were all rather small but wiry, 
active fellows, full of life'. Their conformation gen- 
erally was very good, one of the older ones having 
already captured prizes at horse shows. Mr. Guinear 
was not closing out his stock, merely selling some 
of his surplus. During the past year he added a fine 
line of brood mares to his farm. He- will continue 
his efforts to produce another Saraway colt that will 
be the equal to Winfield Stratton. 

BOGUS PEDIGREE REGISTERS. 

Breeders' Gazette: A number of so-called registers 
or stud books have come into existence the past few 
years for the registry of grade animals Some of 
them will record any pedigree, whether it contains a 
bit of pure blood or not. Others claim that they re- 
quire a certain number of top crosses of registered 
sires before they will accept an animal. We call all 
such registers bogus because they issue certificates of 
pedigrees which will deceive the ignorant into be- 
lieving that they represent pure breeding. It is diffi- 
cult to fathom the motive which would lead any hon- 
est man or men to establish books of records for 
grades. In some cases there can be no manner of 
doubt that the work is planned deliberately to promote 
fraud. It is designed to issue a certificate of registry, 
ornamented with a large gilt seal, with which an un- 
scrupulous salesman may be able to palm off on an 
unsuspecting or ignorant buyer a grade animal as a 
pure bred. Language fails to characterize adequately 
the contemptible characte r of this low form of fraud. 

The season is rapidly approaching when salesmen 
will lie placing stallions all over the country anil 
forming companies for their purchase. Let no man be 
deceived. No horse should be bought without a pedi- 
gree that corresponds in age and markings with the 
animal to which it is said to belong. In ease of any 
doubt the secretary of the stud book should be con- 
sulted. If the name and address of this official is not 
known, we will be glad to supply it. Especial care 
must be exercised to avoid deception that may be 
practiced by certificates issued for grades. Such cer- 
tificates are issued by men in Iowa. Minnesota, Kan- 
sas and New York, and a recent addition to the list is 
a register for grade Percherons operated near Chi- 
cago. Beware of such snares. 



A FASHIONABLE TYPE. 

The introduction of t lie new strain of Hackney- 
blood by Mr. Stephen T. Britten of Menlo Park is an 
acquisition to the breeding interests that will be ap- 
preciated by all lovers of this class of carriage horses 
so much in favor with the rich and fashionable. 
There seems to be a lack in California of what in the . 
East is called "Finish in Carriage Turnouts," and we- 
have very few teams of high stepping carriage horses 
of the Hackney type that have the education de- 
manded in a stylish carriage team of this descrip- 
tion. Mr. Britten, realizing this, has taken to the 
breeding of Hackneys purely from the standpoint of 
an amateur breeder who is in it for the pleasure to 
be derived from the knowledge that he is improving 
the Hackney horses in California and breeding and 
selling a few teams here that would be a credit to 
any part of the world. The bringing out of Mr. 
Britten's new stock should have a very markeel ef- 
fect on Hackney horses here, as it will present a 
chance of cross breeding that should improve the 
stock. The premier stallion of the Toghill Stud is 
the Squire of Chester. He is by Squire Rickell out 
of Danish Lady. This horse is a handsome blue roan 
and is of the breed of prize winners from away back. 
( :-n his sire's side he traces four times to Denmark, 
while the same celebrated stud served three times in 
the breeding of his dam. Mr. Britton purchased his 
stock in Canada from one of the best known breed- 
c is and importers in the Dominion. The Hackneys 
from this farm have a world wide reputation, and 
the show winners that it has sent out caused Mr. 
Britten to seek from that stock for his California 
farm. Squire of Chester is a beautifully built ani- 
mal, with a fine balance that speaks of power in 
every line. He is intelligent, gentle and controllable 
beyond a degree that is expected of a stallion. When 
in motion, he has a gait that is characteristic of the 
Hackney type. Stepping well out in front with a 
high lift that gives the action desired by the fashion- 
able in horses of this description. His haunches are 
well muscled and well cut showing a wonderful power 
of speed and endurance. He is a three-year-old and 
a horse of great promise. Of the mares on the farm. 
Danish Lady, a bay roan, nine years old, is most 
interesting. She is broken both to saddle and har- 
ness and walks, trots and canters in the most ap- 
proved style. She has also won several jumping 
competitions in Canada before she came to this 
Coast. A stable mate of Danish Lady is Lady Minto. 
foaled in 189S. She is by Rarthorpe Performer, out 
of Lady Lynn, and a prettier gaited Hackney will 
be hard to find. She, like Danish Lady, has been 
broken to saddle as well as harness and challenges 
her stable mate for admiration in high stepping 
qualities. Another of Mr. Britten's mares worthy 
of special mention is Lady Lynn, who is by a noted 
Fnglish Hackney, and although well along in years, 
she still retains her Hackney type to perfection. All 
the stock in Mr. Britten's string are registered in the 
English or American Stud Books and have pedigrees 
without a break. Mr. Britten has housed his stock 
in one of the most up to date establishments on the 
Coast, and one visiting the farm cannot help notic- 
ing that all the details have been considered in mak- 
ing it perfect, and when his horses are brought out 
for review, they show the extreme care with which 
they are handled. As will be seen by the advertise- 
ment of the Toghill Stud, a few engagements may 
be booked to Squire of Chester by owners of well 
bred mares. Particulars may be obtained by ad- 
dressing Wm. Walker, manager Toghill Stud, Menlo 
Park, Cal. 

ADMIRES AMERICAN HORSES. 

Edwin Hewlett, the "Father of Coaching in 
France." sailed recently from New York on his way 
to Paris, after his first visit to the L'nited States. Mr. 
Howie tt thinks that the horses to be seen in New- 
York and vicinity are much better than those of 
Paris. • »| 

"I have enjoyed every minute of my stay." said 
tie veteran driver. The residences of the wealthy 
over here are far more sumptuous than I have ever 
seen abroad, the theaters are more wonderful — in 
fact, everything seems to be on a grand scale. 

■'And the horses. I cannot say I have seen a lame 
horse since I came here. All the animals at the 
Horse Show, which I attended, were - wonderful. I 
have been out driving several times with society 
women who were my pupils in Paris, and on the 
roads the horses I saw were, on the whole, excellent 
and speak well for American breeding. 

'One thing that astonished me was the luxury in 
which horses are kept. I have been out to Georgian 
Court, Mr. George Gould's place, and I have seen the 
stables of Mr. H. Mc K. Twombly at Morristown and 
those of Mr. C. K. G Billings I never dreamed of 
such luxury for horses as that in which Mr. Twom- 
bly's are kept. There is nothing in Europe that can 
be compared with it. I hope to get over here again." 
, o 

When P. W. Gooch. the English dealer, employed by 
the National Horse Show Association of America to 
judge saddle horses at the recent show in Madison 
Square Garden, returned to London he took with him 
a lew show horses purchased in New York. Among 
them was a thoroughbred saddle horse entered at the 
Garden show by W. A. McGibbon. and sold by him to 
Mr Gooch; also the thoroughbred gelding St. Bluff 
by St. Blaise, that won second prize as a cavalry horse 
at the Garden show, when exhibited by Mr. McGibbon. 
From Tichenor & Co. of Chicago Mr. Gooch bought a 
handsome trotting bred carriage horse of the 
bioughani type, which he may, it is said, show in 
England. 

o 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



January 6, 19t(», 



5 



THE TROTTER IN THE SHOW RING. 

American Horse Shows are different in some re- 
spects from those of any other country, and as an 
educator in the field of Improving the different types 
of horses all fair minded critics must concede thai 
the system in vogue in this count™ is superior to 
that of any other. , 

In the heavy harness classes in England the only 
competitors as a rule are pure bred hackneys while 
in our shows we have trotting bred horses, hackneys, 
and occasionally French coach horses competing in 
the same classes. By the performances of these dif- 
ferent types our breeder?, are able to form a judg- 
ment as to which of the 'respective breeds is best 
adapted to our use. That a great majority of our 
people are prejudiced to some extent at least in favot 
of the home product is but natural. 

When it is considered that the hackney has been 
bred for more than one hundred years with a view 
to perfecting his qualities as a carriage and fancy 
driving horse, and that the trotter which has been his 
principal opponent in our shows during the past few 
years has been produced by accident, rather than by 
the process of scientific breeding, the showing made 
by the trotter duiing the past year in the different 
contests where these two breeds have been the ac- 
»tors has been most gratifying to the admirers of the 
American bred horse. Progress in tile breeding and 
development of the trotting bred horse as a lush 
stepper has not been of sufficient duration to justify 
the expectation that in contests of this nature he can 
successfully compete with the hackney. And yet, 
notwithstanding this handicap, the victories he has 
won during the past season are scarcely less than 
marvelous. '.. . ' 

The great show stables of the country in which the 
trotting bred horse alone is relied upon to carry their 
colors to victory in the heavy harness classes are 
those of J. Hobart Moore of Chicago. Alfred G. and 
Reginald C. Vanderbilt of New York, and C. Y\ 
Watson of Baltimore. The only exclusive hackney 
stable of any considerable importance now being ex- 
hibited is that of Eben D. Jordan of Boston Both 
Judge W. H. Moore and Mrs. John Gerken of New- 
York own and exhibit both breeds, and as the battle 
for show ring honors at the large shows during the 
past season has been largely between the entries 
from these stables a brief review of some of the prin- 
cipal contests may prove of interest in showing the 
progress the trotter has made in this comparatively 
new field as well as the important part he is likely 
to play in future show ring contests. 

The first great show of the year where the above 
mentioned stables with the exception of Mr. Wat- 
son's came in competition was at Philadelphia. In 
an important high stepping class, at that show were 
entered among others Judge Mbore's peerless, hack- 
ney gelding Forest King J. Hobart Moore s well 
known and popular prize winning trotting bred Bur- 
lingham. Mr. Jordan's great hackney mare Hildred. 
•md Reginald C. Vanderbilfs splendid young trotting 
bred gelding The Dictator. This class is selected for 
the reason that in it was some of the highest class 
specimens of these two breeds owned in this country. 
In some respects the contest was hardly fair to the 
American bred horse for the reason that Forest King 
is not onlv a phenomenal show ring horse, but in all 
the years that English breeders have been engaged 
in perfecting the highest type of high steppers it is 
not believed that they have ever produced but one 
Forest King. And it may also be said that every- 
thing considered it is doubtful if they have ever pro- 
duced another mare that was the superior of Hildred. 
Both Burlingham and The Dictator are the products 
of accidental breeding. Watching the performances 
of these grand horses presented an object lesson full 
of instruction to those interested in the production 
and development of the trotting bred high stepper. 
Forest King is gifted with an ability to fold his 
knees to a greater extent than any other horse ever 
seen in this country, and in this respect it is not be- 
lieved that he has an equal living. He also Hecks 
his hocks to a degree seldom seen in a high stepping 
show horse. While therefore as a horse for fanc> 
work before a gig or other vehicle where the element 
of speed is not a necessary factor he is in a class by 
himself yet it must be remembered that his excessive 
action calls into play all of his progressive machinery 
and if he expends his power in high stepping it ne- 
cessarily follows that he has no reserve force to pro- 
pel him forward when much speed is required. Bur- 
lingham is a horse of quite " different type and is 
1)U ilt upon more rugged lines than the celebrated 
hackney His knee action while remarkably good, 
lacks much of being equal to that of Forest King, 
while his hock action is so comparatively inferior 
as to mar the beauty which a perfectly balanced gait 
present- While therefore Burlingham was not able 
to step as high as his hackney competitor yet it was 
plain that he had not used up his propelling power 
in the effort, and was able to trot faster than either 
of the hackneys. 

Balanced and unbalanced gaits are among the dis- 
tinguished characteristics which separate the two 
breeds as finished show ring performers. The beauti- 
fully turned Hildred is an excellent example of the 
strides made in England towards perfecting the best 
type of horse for fancy and serviceable purposes. 
Perhaps no horse now before the public has a more 
evenly balanced gait than this superb animal pos- 
sesses, and when viewed from the side none is more 
attractive. The superior qualities of Forest King .inn 
Hildred spoken of are the results of study and the 
application of intelligent methods to the subject of 
breeding for a specific purpose. With this advantage 
in favor of the hackney it could hardly be expected 
that the trotting bred horses in this class would make 
much of a showing, and yet while the judges placed 
Forest King first, they placed Burlingham over Hil- 



dred who in turn defeated The Dictator for third 
place. 

The limits of this article will not permit a review 
of any considerable number of contests between the 
hackney and trotter for show ring honors the past 
season. It is however desirable to consider to some 
extent the important classes at the National show in 
which the two breeds participated. 

The first class was for novice horses not under 15.1 
and not exceeding IT). 3. There were twenty-nine en- 
tries the most of which were trotting bred. Among 
the hackneys were Mr. Jordan's grand mare Lao- 
damia and Irvington Farm's Queen Welcome and 
Bally Prince. The best of the trotting bred animals 
were Mr. Watson's Lord Baltimore. Alfred G. Van- 
derbilfs The Youngster, J. Hobart • Moore's Bur- 
lingame and Edward Kinerien's Kissing. The rib- 
bons were given to the trotting bred animals above 
named, and for once in a large class of high step- 
pers the hackneys were clearly beaten and left the 
ring without an award of any kind. 

In a class for middle-weight pairs there were six 
contestants, of which Mr. Jordan's well known Lord 
Burleigh and Lord Belfast, and William Can's mag- 
nificent rcans, Roan King and Fakenham Princess, 
were the hackney representatives. This class was 
won by the trotting bred mares Wilpen Belle and 
Wilpen Beauty, second prize was awarded to J. Ho- 
bart Moore's trotting bred geldings Harold H. and 
Lord Roberts and third prize was the only one the 
hackneys secured, that going to the Jordan entry. 
The middle weight class for single horses had eigh- 
teen contestants all of which with four exceptions 
were trotting bred. The hackneys were Lord Bur- 
leigh, Electric Light, Roan King and Fakenham Prin- 
cess. The judges placed Lawrence Jones' trotting 
bred Gallant Lad first, and Lord Burleigh second. 
The other prize winners were both trotting bred. In 
another class, which was won by Forest King, the 
trotting bred mare Laughing Water defeated Mr. 
Jordan's hackney mare Laodamia for second place, 
and the other hackneys did not get a ribbon. The 
class for small pairs of high steppers was won by 
the trotting bred Newsboy and Shopgirl, Kitty Grey 
and Norma the only hackneys in the class were 
placed second. 

In the class for light weight single horses there 
were twenty-four entries, of whic h the only hack- 
neys were Mr. Jordan's Norina and Miss Emily Bed- 
ford's Fandango Rufus. This class was won by Mrs. 
Gerken's trotting bred Shopgirl. The only ribbon 
given to the hackneys was the yellow which went to 
Norina. The class for single brougham horses was 
won by the trotting bred Operator, and the other 
ribbon Winner.- were all trotting bred. Mr. Jordan's 
Electric Light, the only hackney in the class, being 
left entirely outside the awards. The two breeds 
competed in three tandem classes and another vic- 
tory for the trotting bred animals resulted. The 
small class was won by the hackneys Kitty Grey and 
Norina. The middle weight by the trotting bred 
Laughing Water and Indian Chief, and the large 
class by the trotting bred The Youngster and Rustl- 
ing Silk. 

The championship classes in which the hackneys 
and trotting bred horses competed resulted in a prac- 
tically drawn battle. In the two important gig 
classes Forest King was invincible, Hildred was 
placed reserve in one class, and Lord Baltimore in 
the other. 

This general summary of results in the principal 
heavy harness classes furnishes much encourage- 
ment to the admirers of the American type of car- 
riage horse anil is an indication of what can be ac- 
complished by persistent efforts along correct lines of 
breeding. This showing, however, is somewhat mis- 
leading, and in justice to the hackneys it should be 
said that the entry of trotting bred animals out- 
numbered the hackneys as many as ten to one. and 
that two of the three judges are what is known as 
"trotting horsemen." While it is not probable that 
this fact would consciously effect their decisions, yet 
where as in many .cases', the contest was exceedingly 
close, it is but human to believe- that they would 
favor the American product. In the lighter classes 
such as the runabout, the roadster, the hackney 
makes no pretense of being the equal of his trotting 
bred cousin, and it is exceedingly rare that anything 
but the trotting bred is entered in those classes. 

As both breeds sprang from the same ancestry, 
there is no apparent reason why, if American breed- 
ers pursue the same methods as those that produced 
the hackney, they can not in time evolve a type of 
horse that will be as successful in the show ring as 
he has been upon the race track. The difference in 
the methods adopted by English and American breed- 
ers is strikingly illustrated in the types of horses 
exhibited each year in American show rings. In 
England there has never been any interest taken in 
the sport of light harness racing and the aim of the 
producer has been to produce a highly finished horse 
with plenty of bone and substance for heavy harness 
work without reference to extreme speed, while in 
this country the exact reverse has been true and 
the object sought has been ability to win races re- 
gardless of conformation, bone, size, or high step- 
I ing qualities. < Hie system has produced the hack- 
ney of whic h Hildred is a sample, and the other has 
evolved the trotting bred race horse of which the 
champion roadster show mare Allie Nuim is a prom- 
inent specimen. 

The hackney blood of Imp. Bellfounder that coursed 
through the veins of 1 la mbleton ia n 10 occasionally 
crops out in his descendants and it is from this foun- 
tain head that most of the successful trotting bred 
show horses have come. It is therefore within the 
range of probability that if the tendency to show 
ring qualities in heavy harness classes which many 
of the descendants of George Wilkes possess, be cul- 
tivated and properly developed, the trotting bred 



horse will be a more prominent show ring figure in 
future years than he was in 190r>. — P. M. Babcock, in 
Christmas Horseman. 

ESSENTIALLY A PRACTICAL ANIMAL. 

The American trotting-bred horse is essentially a 
practical animal, especially adapted to adding to the 
comfort and pleasure of his owner. While quite a 
number are used each season for purposes of racing, 
by long odds the greater proportion of trotting-bred 
horses are used for purposes of business or pleasure, 
says the Western Horseman. This being true, why is 
it that so few breeders of light harness horses pay SO 
little attention to ultimate use of the products of their 
farms? Unless the foals are thought good enough 
to race, or good enough to partially develop and then 
sell to those looking for racing prospects, the trot- 
ting-bred foals on too many farms are never thor- 
oughly broken and pass from them in an unfinished 
condition 

It is a lamentable fact, but nevertheless a true one, 
that on many farms devoted largely or in whole to 
the breeding of the light harness horse the visitor 
will note the absence of suitable driving horses. At 
many farms the owner must resort to a public stable 
whenever he wishes to make a drive for business or 
pleasure. Men with thousands of dollars invested In 
the breeding of trotters will patronize the livery sta- 
ble when they have occasion to drive a patron or 
visitor to the farm. This is no fanciful tale. The 
writer has seen it demonstrated in by far too many 
instances, not alone in the west, but in Ohio. Ken- 
tucky. Massachusetts, Rhode Island and other states 
located east of the Mississippi river. 

Every foal bred i.i trotting lines will not mature 
into a stake winner, or even a horse good enough to 
race through the "short grass circuit." A majority of 
the foals must be sold for other uses. This being true, 
why not make it a point to thoroughly break the 
horses that must find an outlet through the general 
channels of trade and prepare them for some par- 
ticular business? 

Every few days it is stated by some one connected 
with the breeding of light harness horses that deal- 
ers make too large profits on the horses that pass 
through their stables. There is a reason for this, 
and the cause rests with the breeder. The colts and 
lillies are not broken at home as they should be, are 
not especially prepared for market, and must naturally 
be put through o course of education after passing 
into the dealer's hands. 

The party looking for a pair of coach or carriage 
horses will not purchase the average trotting-bred 
horse as he comes from the breeding farm The 
horse is not a finished product, is not ready for the 
work desired to place him at, and is not at all desir- 
able as a coach, carriage, surrey, trap or coupe ani- 
mal. The dealer is prepared to furnish the buyer with 
a finished horse, one that has been thoroughly schooled 
in the ways of heavy harness horses, hence is always 
able to secure a handsome profit on each animal sold. 

Breeders of light harness horses should always be 
able to turn out, at a moment's notice, a handsome, 
stylish, clever-acting single driver, or a pair of at- 
tractive and thoroughly broken carriage horses, and 
this thing of owners being compelled to patronize a 
public stable whenever they have occasion to drive, 
either for pleasure or business, should come to an 
end. When this condition of affairs becomes general 
among breeders of trotting-bred horses, we will hear 
less of the dealer reaping all the profits of the in- 
dustry. It w ill also enable owners to more thoroughly 
appreciate and enjoy the fruits of their breeding, 
which of itself will be equal to a reasonable per 
cent of profit on their investments in lands, im- 
provements, stock, etc. 

London society is to pay a tardy homage to the 
horse. At last they are to hold a horse show there. 
Not one of the dull, old-fashioned horse fairs, so long 
popular with the English, but a genuine American 
horse show, or rather, an international one, conducted 
after the American methods. It is to be held in the 
vast auditorium of the London Olympla, which, for the 
occasion, is to be modeled as closely as possible aftet 
the Madison Square Garden Horse Show, in the early 
part of next year, and is to be patronized by the 
King and Queen and most of all London's smart set. 
The social aspect of the show, however, is perhaps not 
the most interesting. That will be a picturesque tour- 
nament between American and English breeders At 
this show, for the first time, the English and Ameri- 
can show horses will be brought into direct rivalry. 
There will be a battle royal between the American 
standard bred trotting and coach horses and the fa- 
mous English hackney, commencing with exhibiting 
what is considered the American gentlemen's trotting 
horse, known as the speedy roadster (long tail), many 
of which are already owned in Europe. 

The fast four-year-old colt Casco, by Moko, dam 
Hattle Case, dam of Fereno. 2:05%, by Simmons, 2:28. 
has been purchased by Lawrence Jones of Louisville, 
Ky. from John B. Stewart of Lexington and will be 
prepared for the show ring. Casco was one of the 
most promising colts in training at Lexington. 

F. H. del Carroll. New Orleans, La., is the present 
owner of the M. & M. winner of 1904, Stanley Dil- 
lon, and is using him on the load. 



Purses amounting to $5, 000 will be given at the ice 
meeting at Montreal January 23-27. 

Harold D. 2:11% by Dexter Prince Is said to be the 
snow pacing champion of Philadelphia this winter. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet. 



6 



[January 6, 19CG 



NOTES AND NEWS. M 



Sol Shockley of Merced had the misfortune to lose 
his stallion, Loyalty, last week. The horse was play- 
ing in his paddock and slipped, injuring himself in- 
ternally so that he died in a very short time. 



A five-year-old colt, standing 14.2, weighing 900 
pounds, a bright bay in color and suitable for a polo 
pony, as he can run a quarter in 23 second or better, 
is offered for sale or the owner will trade for a draft 
stallion. See advertisement. 



Los Angeles, Woodland, Santa Rosa and Sacra- 
mento can be depended on as places where good har- 
ness meetings will be held this year. Fresno, San 
Jose. Pleasanton, Stockton and several other places 
where good mile tracks are located should declare 
themselves in early in the season. 



April 1st is the date of the next payment on colts 
and fillies entered in the Breeders' Futurity for three- 
year-olds of 1906. Due notice will be sent to all nom- 
inators by the secretary. 



W hen one looks over the list of 2:15 performers 
under their sires, it is very easy to understand why 
breed rs are enthusiastic over the great McKinney. 
No other stallion living or dead can approach him 
as a sire of 2:15 performers. 



A large number of new stalls will be erected imme- 
diately at the Concord race track as the demand for 
stall room is much greater than the supply. The 
Concord track is one of the best training tracks In 
California. A first-class county fair and race meet- 
ing will be held there this year. 



Stranger O. 2.0S«4 won the 2:09 pace at Phoenix, 
with Daedalion second in each heat. The time was 
2:09%, 2: 10%, 2:10%. 

There were never three handsomer full brothers 
than the McKinney stallions Tom Smith 2:13%, 
Constructor and Gen. J. B. Frisbie. They will all be 
in the stud in California this year. 



■ At the Kenney Manufacturing Company's shops at 
531 Valencia street, there is now a second-hand Mc- 
Murray cart that is a good one, and for sale at a bar- 
gain price. Mr. Kenney invites horsemen to call and 
see a beautiful new light speed cart just in from the 
eastern factory. It is about the neatest thing in the 
cart line yet made 



' Star Pointer 1:59% continues to be the great attrac- 
tion at Pleasanton track and all visitors want to take 
a look at the first two-minute horse. Mr. DeRyder 
reports that the prospects are excellent for a good 
season and many high class mares. 



"Shorty" Roberts reports his fast stallion Eden 
Vale 2:16 by Bros, son of Electioneer, as looking fine 
and fit for the season of 1906, which he will make 
at Mr. Roberts' Sea Breeze Resort on the ocean beach 
in this city. 



Few stallions that have stood in California have 
sired as uniform size, style and speed as Seymour 
Wilkes. Every colt he gets is a $300 horse as soon 
as he is three years old. That's the sort to raise. 
There is a good profit in raising the get of this horse 
as one always has a salable colt. They all have 
speed, too, and are from Missouri as soon as they are 
broke to harness. 



The breeders of San Benito county are very lucky 
in having such a horse as Dictatus Medium in their 
midst. His sire is the sire of two 2:10 performers 
and his dam is the dam of Stam B. 2:11%, one of the 
best trotters ever seen in this State. There is no 
better breeding than that of Dictatus Medium. Ho 
is siring speed, all of his colts old enough to train 
being good gaited and naturally fast. Breeders 
should not overlook Dictatus Medium when looking 
for a sire that will pay to breed to. 



The blood of the old campaigner Director 2.17 is 
good to have on any stock farm. There is at Hay- 
wards. Cal., a very handsome son of Director called 
Educator. He Is owned by Mr. M. Henry and gets 
as handsome foals as any sire in California. The 
most profitable way to breed is to try to get a hand- 
some roadster. If it trots or paces fast enough to 
race, so much the better and the profit is greater. 
But get your handsome horse first and you can al- 
ways sell. The sons and daughters of Educator never 
linger on the market. A word to the wise is suffi- 
cient. 



Fearnot by Lynmont won a good race at the Phoe- 
nix. Arizona, meeting Christmas week, pacing his 
three winning boats In 2:14%, 2:14% and 2:13^4. 
Billy A. was second and Byron Lace third. 



Boralmas Brother won a hotly contested race from 
the fil.ly Helen Dare by Zombro at Phoenix, Arizona, 
last week. The time of the three heats was 2:20%, 
2:16% and 2:16%. 



It has been officially announced that the Memphis 
Trotting Association will not apply for dates in the 
.Grand Circuit for 1906, and that there will be no other 
meetings held at that track till the anti-betting laws 
of Tennessee are repealed. 



W. S. Clark, the well known horseman of Concord, 
Contra Costa county, will have the Red Wilkes stal- 
lion Dictatus 2:17 in the stud at the Concord track 
this year. Dictatus is coming rapidly to the front 
as a sire of speed. He has two in the 2:10 list — Fun- 
ston 2:08% and Dictatress 2:08%, and another, Oma 
A. 2:10%, that is knocking at the door. Dictatus is 
being wintered at the Brentwood Stock Farm and 
looks like a two-year-old. 



Mr. C. C. Crippen, one of the best posted horse- 
men in California, has associated himself with Budd 
Doble, owner of the great trotting stallion Kinney 
Lou 2:07%, and will assist the prince of reinsmen 
in the management of this horse during the coming 
season. It was due in a great measure to Mr. Crip- 
pen's energetic work that Searchlight and Lecco were 
so well patronized during the time they were in Cali- 
fornia, as he was at that time in the employ of their 
owners. Few men in California have made a closer 
study of harness horse breeding than Mr. Crippen, 
who is not only a deep student of pedigrees and 
blood lines, but also a practical horseman, having 
been for years connected with the training depart- 
ment of the Palo Alto Stock Farm. Mr. Doble has 
secured a very valuable man in Mr. Crippen and the 
latter is already at work getting out Kinney Lou 
literature for the season of 1906, which promises to 
be a record breaker for this, the greatest trotting 
son of McKinney. The yearlings and weanlings by 
Kinney Lou are such handsome, natural trotters that 
their owners are already predicting that his list of 
standard performers will begin growing as soon as 
his foals are old enough to start, and will contain 
many very high class performers. 



Zolock set the Arizona pacing record at 2:07 on the 
opening day of the Territorial Fair at Phoenix, and a 
few days later, when Hazel Patch and Zolock met in 
a race there, the association offered $50 for every 
half second this mark was reduced. Hazel Patch 
paced a heat in 2:05% and was awarded $175 in addi- 
tion to the regular purse. 



An advertiser desires to purchase a good surrey 
horse. See advertisement for description of horse 
wanted. 



Alta McDonald denies the story that is going the 
rounds of the Eastern horse papers to the effect that 
Sweet Marie 2.04% recently figured in a runaway. 
He says nothing of the sort ever happened, that the 
McKinney mare is all right and ready to meet all 
comers during 1906. 



The stallion, Lord Russell, full brother to Maud S. 
2:08%. died at Newark, Ohio, Tuesday night, Decem- 
ber 26. He died the property of Mr. H. V. Hard way, 
of that city. Lord Russell, because of his breeding, 
his dam being the famous Miss Russell, enjoyed con- 
siderable fame during the early part of his life. He 
was foaled in 1881,, and was bred by A. J. Alexander, 
Spring Station, Ky. He was the sire of thirty-five 
standard perforemrs. Among them the following: 
Kremlin 2:07%, Hustler Russell 2:12%. Russellmont 
2:12%, Sea Bird 2:13%, Lee Russell 2:16%, and oth- 
ers. Twenty-two of his sons are sires of standard 
performers. He has beeen owned at Newark for 
several years. 



Horsemen have read with thrilling interest the 
graphic description of the taming of Pommers, by Sir 
Conan Doyle, in his first chapter of "Sir Nigel Lor- 
ing." According to Sir Conan, the famous Pommers 
was by a Spanish sire, his dam being an Arab. Also, 
according to Sir Conan, the famous yellow horse was 
seventeen hands high. The novelist, like the poet, 
is accorded wide latitude, but. as a matter of fact, 
it is doubtful whether there ever lived in real life 
a horse of the height named possessed of the blood 
lines described. To begin with, the Spanish horse 
was, and is, of Saracen blood and kin to the Arabian, 
if not of pure Arabian blood; probably a Barb, which 
is a half-breed Arabian. The pure Spanish horse 
was. and is to-day. a small animal — scant fifteen 
hands — while the average Arabian is about 14.2. Each 
breed is noted for its weight-carrying qualities, but. 
at best, fitted only for light cavalry. When the Sara- 
cens invaded the South of France along in the eighth 
century, though splendidly mounted and the best 
horsemen the world had ever seen, it was the heavy 
Flanders horses ridden by Charles Martel and his 
followers that overcame the invaders and drove them 
back, and not the superior bravery of the French. 
There is so much of poetry and romance connected 
with the Spanish horse and his congener, the Arab- 
ian, that Sir Conan doubtless felt justified in mount- 
ing Sir Nigel on an animal that could trace his lineage 
to the stud of King Solomon. Possibly Pommers was 
a freak. — Ex. 



The Mikado 2:19% is being talked about as one 
of the "low down" trotters of 1906. He is credited 
with a mile better than 2:15 over a half mile track. 
The Mikado is by Russia out of Lea 2.18%, own sister 
to Sidney Dillon and Cupid 2:18. 



Trainer John Howell has Tiverton 2:04% looking 
as good and strong as he ever did in his career, says 
Trotter and Pacer. He is going sound and it is his 
opinion that he will be as good or better than he was 
in the spring of 1904. It only goes to show what care 
will do, especially by a man of intelligence and pa- 
tience. Senator Mills 2:12% is big and strong, and it 
will surprise but a few if he lowers his record quite 
a little next season. They will both be shipped to 
Poughkeepsie early in the spring to be prepared to 
meet all comers in their resp< ctive classes. 



Dr. J. C. McCoy, the former owner of Boralma 2:07 
and Ethel's Pride 2:07%, says the practice of doping 
trotters and pacers is becoming very common, despite 
the rule made at the last Turf Congress to stamp it 
out. He gives it as his opinion that stimulating dope 
caused the death last season of several prominent 
trotters, whose sudden taking off was attributed to 
dilation of the heart. It was dilation of the heart 
which caused the death of Sadie Mac 2:06>4. 



Onward 2:25% now heads the list of trotting sires, 
With 146 trotters and 40 pacers to his credit In the 
2:30 list. The. great son of George Wilkes died the 
property of W. E D. Stokes a few years ago. If 
living he would now be thirty years old. 

More than two thousand trotters and pacers entered 
the 2:30 list in the harness racing campaign of 1905. 
About as many more previously in the list lowered 
their records. 



J. M. Johnson is now president of the New England 
Horse Breeders' Association. The directors made an 
excellent selection. 



Dr. J. C. Mewhinney of Spring City, Pa., claims the 
distinction of owning the largest pacing horse in the 
world — Frank .Marriott, who got a mark of 2:12% in 
a seven-heat race at Tiffin, O., July 11, 1902, for a 
$1,000 purse. He is 17 hands high, weighs 1,200 
pounds. Is of symmetrical form, and with a tail that 
touches the ground. He went in a race for a $2,000 
purse at Cleveland, O., July 29. 1901, finishing second 
to Dan Patch and beating out Pauling Boy, Legal Hal 
and Barolitta. He can go a half in one minute flat, 
and wear* only quarter boots Dr. Mewhinney uses 
his famous pacer in his daily calls on patients, and 
says that he is not for sale. 



Mr. Nathan Straus has a couple at the Empire 
li n k, says Trotter and Pacer, that will bear watching 
the coming year. A bay filly by Handspring 2:18%, 
out of the champion of her day, Alix 2:03%. She is 
four years old, about 15.3 hands, and has been worked 
hut very little, as she was thought to be with foal, 
but proved not to be. She looks as though she would 
learn to trot very fast. The other is a bay colt by 
the same sire out of Semi-Tropic 2.24. by Sultan 2:24. 
second dam Lady Mackey (dam of Oakland Baron 
2: 09 V*, by Sllverthreads. He is five years old, 15.3 
hands and has been a mile this fall in 2:16%. The 
speedway string, Ida Highwood 2:09%, Ted 2:1514, 
Malacca 2:18%, and last but not least the old warrior 
Cobwebs, now nearly eighteen years old, are all in 
the best of condition. Mr. Straus is indeed fortunate 
to have as reliable and painstaking a trainer and man- 
ager as he has in Tim Sullivan. 

Dispatches from Cleveland, O., which may or may 
not be authoritative, state that instructions have been 
received from Mr. C. K. G. Billings for Major Delmar 
and Lou Dillon to remain in that city during Mr. Bil- 
lings' sojourn abroad, and that Major Delmar will be 
trained and driven against his record in the matinees 
next season, while Lou Dillon is to be turned out for 
a year s rest. It is stated further that Mr. Billings 
contemplates breeding the queen next season, and that 
if he does she will be mated with John A. McKerron 
The dispatch further says: "Recently the millionaire 
horseman of Chicago has written to several prominent 
horsemen asking advice as to whether it would be 
advisable to breed the champion mare, and the an- 
swers have been uniformly in the affirmative, so that 
the mating of the great performers in the spring is 
practically assured. Major Delmar will be put on edge 
during the matinees of the Cleveland Matinee Club, 
and later in the season will be given a campaign 
against speed records. Mr. Billings is expected to in- 
terrupt his European trip for a month or six weeks 
dming September and October, and will drive the 
champion pacing gelding in his trials against records." 



John H.Shults bought several of the Haggin thor- 
oughbred mares to breed to Axworthy. • 



John Quinn, the well known Santa Rosa trainer, 
reached l'leasanton on Wednesday of this week with 
eight head of trotters and Joe Cuicello followed the 
next day with his string. The new stalls recently 
erected by Mr. Ronan, owner of the Pleasanton track, 
are now about tilled and there is demand for more. 



S. K. TreTry hooked up Kenneth C. 2:17 at Pleas- 
anton last Wednesday for the first time since the 
State Fair last year. The son of McKinney is grow- 
ing right along, and moved out like the great young 
trotter he is. 



It is said 500,000 people attended the Live Stock 
Show at Chicago last week, and the Horseman says 
the development of the live stock exposition is only 
one of the signs of the fact that the farmer has ar- 
rived and now commands the attention and respect 
which rightfully belongs to him. For his use the 
largest exposition building in the country has been 
reconstructed at an expense of $200,000, and it is in- 
adequate. Already plans are being drawn to make it 
still larger. And with each succeeding year the far- 
mer will be more and more in evidence as an impor- 
tant factor in the business and financial world. The 
prosperity of the country depends on him more than 
any one class, and fortunately for prosperity and the 
country he is not a hard task master. He gives 
more than he receives and the abundance of the earth 
is his. 



The management of the Libertyville, 111., track has 
decided to give a meeting the week preceding the 
opening of the Grand Circuit. 



JaNDary 6, 19i(S 



THOROUGHBRED DEPARTMENT. 

By RALPH H. TOZER, 



Walter Jenning's luck changed from bad to good on 
the first day of 1906, and his big horse, Proper, an- 
nexed the New Year's Handicap, first money in which 
amounted to $2420. It was nothing short of a ' fluke" 
that enabled the Prestonpans horse to get home three 
parts of a length in front of Gregor K., who beat 
Lubin (by long odds the best horse in the race) for 
place honors. Lubin was virtually left at the post, 
Treubel seeming to be in a hypnotic state at barrier- 
raise. "The dope" shows him sixteen lengths behind 
Gregor K., at the quarter pole, or three furlongs after 
the start had been effected. That Elliott's flyer was 
but a head behind the pace-setter, Gregor K.. at the 
finish, shows what a horse Lubin was on January 1, 
1906. Making up ten lengths in the last seven fur- 
longs on such a horse as Proper italicizes his worth, 
and, as said in last week's issue. Lubin can beat 
Proper at even weights and probably could give Jen- 
ning's horse a couple of pounds and a beating. At 
any rate, with 123 pounds and a wide-awake rider on 
Lubin to 122 pounds on Proper, at a mile and a quar- 
ter, we would see a sure enough horse race. Dr. 
Leggo's poor showing in the New Year's Handicap 
was a big disappointment to his friends, who are 
legion. Callaghan apparently did not like the heavy 
going and was next to Dr. Leggo, the last horse at 
the finish. 



The first race of 1906 in this part of the world was 
won by Lucrece at odds of 20 to 1. Owner Coffey ap- 
parently loves long odds, Cloche d'Or winning at odds 
of 13 to 1 at Ingleside just a few days previously. 

Barney Schreiber's Sain horses, Pinkerton, Bu- 
chanan and Tom McGrath, made a good showing on 
the initial day of the new year, out of three starts 
winning three, while the Balgowan filly, Marion Rose, 
ran third in the two-year-old race. 



By the way, the practice of giving two-year-old 
races on the first of January cannot be too strongly 
criticized^ The jockey clubs that put them on the 
program are guilty of doing great harm to the breed 
of horses of this country, when the object of the 
association is always given, "the improvement of the 
breed of race horses." It's a safe bet that of the ten 
starters in the alleged two-year-old race, not one was 
over twenty-three months of age, while perhaps fifty 
per cent were not twenty-two months old and some 
not even twenty-one months old. The racing of the 
little 'baby-class" gallopers that should be out in the 
field acquiring bone and muscle through the stomach 
route until at least two-years old before even know- 
ing whHlt a race track looks like or feeling the touch 
of a "breaking' 'outfit, are "broken" at eighteen 
months of age or less and put to racing, often when 
not over twenty months old. This can be likened to 
asking a thirteen-year old boy to do a stevedore's 
work six days per week and expecting him to grow 
up as straight as an Indian and as strong as the 
proverbial ox. It's against Nature, and the old lady 
will have her way. The jockey clubs that give races 
for horses of the tender age spoken of are catering 
only to a class of greedy owners who have nothing 
of the welfare of the turf at heart when they will 
race their "realy" baby racers on the first day of 
January. "Quick action" is all right in this com- 
mercial age, but horsemen should not be allowed to 
get it at the expense of the breed of race horses. The 
right thing for all jockey clubs to do is to improve the 
breed, and in order to do this there should be no two- 
year-old races on a racing program until July, and 
then they would be sure enough two-year-olds. The 
watchword of turfmen the past twenty years has 
been "quick action and speed at the expense of 
stamina and soundness." If foals did not come along 
until May and June, when the mother had had a run 
of eight or ten weeks on the best of green feed, don't 
you think she would be better prepared to give you 
a sturdy racer than if the foal came in January or 
February, when there is no green feed to be had? 
And if there were no two-year-old races until July 
of each year would not there be a better chance for 
development of the young racers and more soundness 
of limb and wind before putting them at their life's 
work? This is something for the jockey clubs to 
ponder over carefully. 



W. O'B. Macdonough had his great old mare Lib- 
bertiflibbet chloroformed the other day to put her out 
•f the miseries attendant upon extreme old age. Lib- 
bertiflibbet, a daughter of Bullion (by War Dance) 
from a daughter of Kingfisher (like War Dance, also 
a son of Lexington) was one of the best producers 
on this Coast, being the mother of Flibbetigibbet, 
Valeneienne, Gold Lace, Hainault, Honiton, and last 
not least, the famous George C. Bennett, which died 
died recently at Louisville and for which Fred Cook 
had refused $30,000. The late August Belmont bred 
Libbertiflibbet, also her dam, and imported her grand 
dam from England. 



Ed Hayes, who rode the first winner here of 1906. 
viz.: Lucrece, was taken to France by Johnny Camp- 
bell in 1904 after having ridden several times at 
Butte, Mont., in 1903, when a 60-pounder. In France 
he piloted several winners. 



Butte and Anaconda should be eager for a race meet- 
ing, none being held there for nearly three years, 
while Salt Lake should support a meeting of ten days 
or two weeks in good style. Denver was always a 
good racing city. 

— 1 

Quinlan & Wilson secured Elscamado for $825 by 
the claiming route January 1st. 



Sam Hildreth has lost $41,000 booking at New Or- 
leans, and announces that his slate will never again 
be seen in any betting ring. In his opinion, Western 
players are much wiser than those of the effete East. 



The New California Jockey Club has substituted 
a five-furlong sprint for a $1500 purse for the mile 
and a sixteenth $2500 special the latter part of this 
month. Bearcatcher, Cruzados, San Nicholas and 
Neva Lee are named as eligible?. 



George H. Keene left early this week for Memphis. 
Tenn., going to the Tennessee metropolis to prepare 
a number of two-year-olds for the coming fray. 



Harry Stover's stable is furnishing more long-shot 
winners' than any in the country. On the 1st of 
January a filly at 100 to 1 won for him at Ascot, 
and on Tuesday Ray Egan won at the same place at 
odds of 30 to 1, and The Lieutenant at 12 to 1 at 
Emeryville. 



Barney Schreiber heads the list of winning owners 
at the local tracks, and Proper's win of the New 
Year's Handicap will put Jennings in close proximity 
to the genial German. 



Enoch Wishard thinks Ort Welles sure to stand 
training this season. 



Chicago, January 2. — Nicol leads all jockeys for 
last year with 857 mounts, 221 wins, 143 seconds, 136 
thirds. W. Knapp is second with 1021 mounts, 186 
wins, 158 seconds, 139 thirds. Radtke is third with 
693 mounts, 177 wins. 129 seconds, 97 thirds. It was 
Radtke's first year on the track. Barney Schreiber 
heads the list of owners who raced exclusively in 
the West with $46,030. Ninety-nine winners carried 
his colors. He was ninety-four times second and 
eighty-seven times third. Corrigan holds the record 
for the year of races won with exactly 100. 



' The English racing public is supposed to be an 
easygoing one," said a gentleman who has been 
abroad recently, "but they would tear the fence down 
and kill the starter and his assistants in quicker time 
than it takes' to tell it if an assistant was to hold a 
heavily-played favorite at the start until the field 
was well on its way. It would never be tried twice 
there, but since the racing began here last Novem- 
ber I've seen seven or eight horses played for a kill- 
ing that were held hard and fast by the 'Hold-on- 
Jimmies,' as they are called. The first time an as- 
sistant takes a horse by the head some good shot 
ought to lop off one of his fingers for him. You 
could beat Ormonde. Hindoo or any other racing 
celebrity in the world with a bunch of bow-wows if 
you can get a man to hold on long enough to the 
public idol. Booking looks like a good proposition 
under the existing conditions." 

Wed.nesd.ay last will long be remembered by the 
layers of odd at Emeryville, for "the ring" suffered 
to the extent of at least $r>0,000 over the day's racing. 
"Plunger'' McManus' book dropped $4,000, Joe Har- 
lan's $2,700, Barney Schreiber's $2,000, others to the 
extent of from $700 to $2,000. 



\Y. P. Fine "boosted" Distributor $300 on Wednes- 
day after he had won the first race, and upon Jim 
Xeil making an insulting remark over the "boost" 
Fine struck at Neil The men were then separated 
before damage was done. Neil was fined $100 for 
provoking the row and Fine $- r >0 for striking at Neil. 

Will Applegate of Louisville is here after a trip 
around the world, and will doubtless book at Emery- 
ville the balance of the season. 



The ten leading winning owners of America during 
the year 1905 were as follows, according to the Daily 
Racing Form of Chicago: 

owners. 1st. 2d. 3d. Amount 

J. R. Keene 28 22 36 $228,724 

H. P. Whitney 33 17 16 170,447 

S. Paget 55 40 36 137,572 

S. S. Brown 80 56 35 113,572 

A. Belmont 27 19 20 85,154 

E. E Smathcrs 62 47 40 70,588 

J. Sanford 8 9 4 56,615 

B. Schreiber 99 94 87 46,020 

T. Hitchcock Jr 18 13 7 45,995 

E Corrigan 100 58 49 41,486 

Edward Corrigan holds the record for the number 

of races won by any owner. Barney Schreiber, who 
is only one behind him, was in the money oftener 
than any other owner. He heads the list of owners 
racing exclusively in the West. 



Elmer D. Lawrence is making an effort to estab- 
lish a racing circuit between Denver and Butte for the 
summer of 1906, and it looks as if he should succeed. 



CURED IN TEN DAYS. 

Mr. C. A. Farley of Craig. Neb., writes as follows: 
"I have used Quinn's Ointment for over ten years with 
the best of results; cured a bad case of curb In 10 days. 
If more of your valuable remedy were used the suf- 
fering of the noble animal would be less. It is far su- 
perior to anything I have tried for curbs, splints, spav- 
ins and bunches. No horseman can be without it." This 
is the general expression of horsemen over I he 

country. If in need of an remedy of this kind, try 
Quinn's Ointment. Price One Dollar per bottle. Ad- 
dress W. !!■ Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y., if you cannot 
obtain from druggist. 



OCTOGENARIAN DRIVER. 

Daniel Bodine of Merchantville, X. J., j s darned to 
be the oldest light-harness horse trainer and driver 
now In active service in the United States. He is past 
81 years of age, and just as efficient as he was a half 
century ago, when he branched out as a driver and 
trainer. He claims that he is as well and hearty and 
can eat a square meal as good as when a boy and 
has never had a day's sickness or an ache or a pain 
during his life time He attributes his remarkable 
longevity to never having smoked or chewed tobacco 
never drinking spirituous or malt liquors or losing any 
sleep In card playing, but claims he can beat anybody- 
pitching ([units In Jersey. 

He was born on September 15, 1824, in his father's 
(James Bodine) tavern at Lycoming, now Berlin, x. 
J.. 15 miles from Camden. At the age of 11 years his 
parents died and he was compelled to hustle for a live- 
lihood. He went to live with a Thomas Wright a 
lover of a good horse, at Berlin, and after driving a 
four-mule team for two years became horse-proud 
and yearned for the time when he could own his own 
trotter. 

He drifted to Philadelphia and for six years sold 
charcoal in the city and drove a ferry wagon, hauling 
goods from the West Jersey ferry. In those days no 
wagons were allowed to cross the river on the boats. 

He finally was appointed ticket seller at the ferry, 
and worked for the company for thirty-one years, his 
duties being usually at night. While in the employ 
of the company he purchased his first horse, a 3-min- 
ute trotter, which he imagined could beat anything' on 
earth. His hopes were soon blasted. He entered 
the animal at the Old Powelton Fair and drove in his 
first race (1853). He claims that when he got to the 
half-mile pole he drove off the track, as the other 
' horses had finished the mile. 

In his day he has owned a large number of horses. 
Among the old timers were Rambo 2:50, the boss of 
the old Plank Road; American Jackson and Victor 
Patchen, a great pole team that he drove together in 
2:38, a remarkable performance in those days. He 
afterward sold them for $4000. Then he got May 
Queen, selling her to John Turner for $1600. Turner 
got $10,000 for the mare; He also had Garwood Patch- 
en, Lady Collier, who could step in 2:20, and in later 
days owned Major S. 2:14, and Irene, trial 2.17%. 

He marked Major for Fred Walton; Palace Girl and 
others for Charles McFadden, and Socrates and Gen- 
eral Russell for Joseph Butterworth. 

Next season he will be again in harness. He is 
wintering a three-year-old pacer, Aroon, b. m. by Vol- 
man, dam Leo 2:12%. He thinks he has his first 2:10 
performer in the mare. Helen Hill, black mare, pacer, 
by Mahogany, a half sister to Miss Mills, is also in his 
stable. 

Bodine has a remarkable memory, and can relate 
stories by the dozen of the old-time, races and men of 
the bygone days.— Philadelphia Record. 

i o 

TWO FOALS IN ONE YEAR. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsman — In my copy of the 
"Breeder" for December 30th, I noticed that Whisper, 
the Fall River, Mass., mare, had two foals in one 
year. To show that California is hard to beat I will 
inform you that my mare, Cheta (trial 2:24%), has 
one two-year-old and two yearlings at the present 
time. The two-year-old, sired by Azmoor 2:20%, 
was foaled January 27, 1904. The first yearling, sired 
by Marvin Wilkes 2:18, was foaled January 7th. 1905, 
and the second yearling, also sired by Marvin Wilkes, 
was foaled December 25th, 1905. When the clock 
struck for the new year of 1906 I had two yearling 
and one two-year-old from the same dam. The first 
two are entered in Breeders' 'Futurity Stakes Nos. 
4 and 5 respectively. 

Hoping this equals the Fall River record and Wish- 
ing you many happy and prosperous New Years, I 
am, Yours very truly, 

PAUL R. SIMS. 

Union House, Sacramento Co. 



A FOPULAK DISTEMPER REMEDY. 

^ Every horseman should not the advertisement of 
Craft's Distemper Cine, manufactured ami sold through- 
out the world for many years by the well known chem- 
ists, the Wells Mcdieine Co., Lafayette, hid. This rem- 
edy is not only an excellent preventive of all germ dis- 
eases among horses, sheep and dogs, but it is a guar- 
anteed cure for distemper, epizootic, pinkeye, and all 
similar troubles, which makes it the most popular of 
remedies among stockmen. Many of the best known and 
most successful trainers of trotters and pacers have 
used the preparation for many years, and without ex- 
ception endorse it. It is sold in liquid form, put up in 
60c and $1.00 bottles, and is obtained at drug stores or 
will be sent prepaid. by the manufacturers. ' 

Get in line with Craft s Distemper (Mire liv sending 
at once to the Wells .Medic ine Co., 1 :; Third St.. Lafay- 
ette, 1 11 d . , for their new 32 page booklet, "Veterinary 
Pointers." It contains much valuable information con- 
cerning the most dreaded diseases of horses and colts 



Pat Foley owns two good McKinney stallions that 
he will place In the stud at Alameda race track dur- 
ing the season of 1906. They are Montesol and Pole 
Star. The first named is out of a mare by Antevolo 
and the other out of a mare by Young Venture. Both 
are bred in great producing lines. 

Secretary Moone of Providence and some of the 
stewards of the Grand Circuit were In conference In 
New York last week with President D. J. Campau. It 
Is said that the annual inci ting of the stewards will 
be held on January 9 at the Hoffman House, New 
York City, where the Grand Circuit for 1906 will be 
decided, upon. 

Jackson's Napa Soda cleanses the stomach and 
renders the eye clear. 



6 



[January (i, 1900 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



COMING EVENTS. 
Rod. 

Jan. I- June I -Closed season for black bass. 

April 1-Sepc. 1j. Oct. 19-Feb. 1— Open season for taking steal- 
head In tidewater. 

Sept. I0-Oct. 18— Close season Id tidewater for steelhead. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season for catcblng salmon. 

Sept. 15-AprIl 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Oct. 18-Nov. 15 • Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. 1-Aprll 1— Trout season closed. 

Nov. I-April I— Closed season for taking steelbead above the 

water. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 

rater. 

Gun. 

July 1-Feb. IS— Dove season open. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 

age hen. 

Oct. I5-Feb. 15— Open season for quail, ducks, ete. 

Oct I5-Aprll 1— Open season for English snipe. 

Oct. 15-Aug I— Deer season closed. 

Bench Shows. 

Jan. 4, 6— Southern Ohio Kennel Club. Hamilton, O. 

Jan 10, 11— Bay State Co-operative Bench Show Association. 
Fall River. Mass. Walter E. SUme, Clerk. 

Jan. 17. 20-Clnclnnati Kennel Association. Cincinnati, O. 
John C. Schomaker, Secretary. 

Feb. 12, 15— Westminster Kennel Club. New York. Robt. V. 
McKIm, Secretary. 

Feb. 20, 23— New England Kennel Club Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. Entries close Jan 20 

Feb 28-March 3— Washington Kennel Club. Washington, Fa. 
F. C. Thomas, Secretary. 

March 7, 10-Duquesne KeDnel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S 
Steadman. Secretary. 

March 13, 16-Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N.Y. S. P. While, 
Secretary. 

March 14. 17— Passaic County Fi-h and Game Frotectlve Asso- 
ciation. Paterson, N. J. Jas Matthews, Secretary. 

March 21, 24- Wolverine Kennel Club. Detroit. Mich. K. G, 
Smith, Secretary. 

May 29, 30— Long Island Kennel Club. Jos. M. Dale, Secretary. 

June 1 2— Ladies Kennel Association of Mass. Mrs. L. M. 
Speed. Secretary. 

June 9— Wlssabickon Kennel Club. Wlstahlckon, Pa. J. Ser- 
geant Price. Secretary 

Sept. 3 li-Taunton Kennel Club. Taunton, Mass. A.J.Lee 
Secretary. 

Sept. 8— Cedarhurst Kennel Club. Cedarhurst, L I. Jno G. 
Bates, Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Jan 8— Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, 23d annual trials. 
Bakersfleld, Cal. Albert Betz. Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Jan 8-Teias Field Trial Club. 4th annual trials. Kansas 

City, Tex. 

Jan. 9— Georgia Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
Waynesboro, Ga. P. M. Essfg, Secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 

Jan I5-Untted States Field Trial Club. 17th annual trials. 
Grand Junction, Tenn. W. B Stafford, Secretary. 

Jan National Championship Field Trial Club 10'h antual 

trials Followln: U. S. All Age Stake. W. B. Stafford, Secre- 
tary, Trenton, Tenn. 

A CHRISTMAS IN THE ANTARCTIC— H U NTI NG 
SEA ELEPHANTS. 

Formerly very plentiful in the Antarctic regions 
and also to some extent plentiful on the California 
coast, the sea elephant (macrorhinus proboscideus) 
is now. in this locality, a past memory and the species 
became practically extinct In the Antarctic. The 
herds were incessantly hunted for years until the 
scarcity of the huge animals made it unprofitable to 
fit out rcssels for a trip to the sea elephants' domain. 
Tempojftry cessation from pursuit enabled the herds 
to increase in the Antarctic. Another variety of the 
species, smaller in size (M. augustirostris), is found 
occasionally on the coast of Lower California, but 
is now almost extinct. 

A decade ago the hunting and killing of the sea 
elephant was revived at Kerguelen Island by a New 
London, Conn., sealer, and again in 1897. a Boston 
vessel visited the island and secured some 4000 of the 
animals for the skins and oil. 

Mr. Robert Hall, a naturalist, who in the summer 
of 1897 and 1898 (winter time in the temperate zone) 
made a trip to the island in the brig Edward, which 
may have been one of the vessels above referred to. 
Mr. Hall gives an Interesting account of the sea 
elephant as he observed It — the bulk and habits of 
the animal, their extraordinary inertia and the diffi- 
culties and dangers of this butchery. The sea ele- 
phant is probably nearer absolute extinction than 
any other mammal in the world to-day. Mr. Hall's 
article states. 

'Kerguelen's Land is a large island of about ninety 
miles long by forty miles wide (South Indian Ocean, 
latitude 49 degrees south, longitude 70 degrees east, 
owned by France), and full of fiords, on the coasts 
of which the sea elephants congregate In numbers, 
more especially on the west coast, where they are 
secure, owing to its ruggedness, dangerous winds and 
currents. It is thought they arrive to rear a family 
in August and our observations lead us to believe 
.-the departure is timed for February and March. Dur- 
ing these months they are very restless, and remain 
no longer the -listless creatures of December. A sea 
elephant is contrary in nature to a sea Hon, for while 
the former on this island is docile and languid, the 
latter on the Aucklands is active and savage. The 
elephant, on observing a stranger, shows a .restless 
eye. but quickly goes to sleep again. You may then 
walk through a herd of fifty sleeping animals and 



merely disturb one or r>\'> for ;i moment. These hot- 
blooded creatures vary in size from six feet to twenty- 
feet six inches, and we found a skeleton of a young 
one about four feet in length. The largest were ex- 
ceedingly difficult to handle; but as the enterprise 
of our ship was principally a commercial one, the 
business faculty was quickly brought to bear upon any- 
awkward and unwilling customer. 

Many of the animals would weigh approximately 
two to six tons. No five men could turn a large bull 
over without special levers, and it needed seven seal- 
ers to haul half a skin along the sand to the boat in 
waiting. As for dragging a whole skin, that was 
quite out of the question under the circumstances. 
For museum purposes we made a preparation of one, 
and this we feared would break the tackle while being 
drawn on board from the end of a towline. Its length 
was only fourteen feet nine inches, with a girth of 
ten feet ten inches about the pectoral girdle. From 
shoulder to shoulder it measured five feet six inches. 
The circumference at the base of the Hipper.- was 
three feet six inches. 

To the great bulk there was a mouth, with a 
breadth at the angle of nine inches only, and a tongue 
(which we found later to be excellent eating) that 
quite filled it. Dr. Stirling has this specimen mounted 
In the South Australian Museum. While the blubber 
ranges from two to six inches in depth, it varies in 
weight. Six men were employed in changing the 
position of one fatty skin while on the skinning 
board. This is a fair example of a male. Which is 
always larger than the female. The congregation 
in harbors was generally systematic. The bulls oc- 
cupied one part of the beach and the cows formed 
a colony in another. There were always several col- 
onies in a harbor, and they seldom appeared to inter- 
mingle. The young were not numerous. They had 
probably set out on their southerly migration before 
our arrival on December 27, or were scattered pro- 
miscuously along the beaches. 

It is the general impression that these mammals 
lie in their rookeries for days or weeks together and 
do not feed otherwise than on their fatty tissue. 
With this view I do not altogether agree, for most of 
the seals are daily to be seen in the water either 
coming in with the full flood or going out with the 
early part of an ebb tide. That a young sea elephant 
six feet in length can live a month on its own fat was 
proved by one we brought to Melbourne, and which 
was lodged in the Aquarium, but died a few months 
later. 

One day as many as eighty may be counted: the 
next day the same beach may only contain ten, with 
other heads poking above the floating weed, and 
showing glassy, round, black eyes, quite wide awake, 
our men have often shot as many as sixty at one 
time, and found next day another twenty had come 
up among the dead, simply because it was their chosen 
lair. This species dislikes expending energy on land, 
and they will lie in a group of twenty to sixty in 
some grassy spot with a sandy landing. Some few- 
will ascend to an inclined distance of 150 yards, and 
there they are not so active as those below, and 
probably do not go out daily. The energy would be 
too much for them, as they are slow crawlers, using 
only two flippers and the snake-like action of verte- 
brae and muscles. 

The first anchorage of the brig was at Royal Sound, 
and before we removed from a beach of four miles 
in extent we had collected 426 skins. Our two an- 
chors were lifted for a second harbor on January 17 
(Greenland Harbor). 

During the first day sixty to seventy were killed, 
and similar results often followed. To shoot more 
at one time was inadvisable. An average of forty per 
day was considered good, and this allowed time to 
ship and 'speck.' i. e.. take the blubber from the 
skin. 

The finest herd we visited just before leaving the 
island. In all, there were twenty-four magnificent 
animals, roughly averaging nineteen feet in length. 
Before introducing ourselves, I noticed one great ele- 
phant take a short cut over another and a quarrel 
arose. Both growled and stood partly supported by 
their shoulder flippers. Another disagreement arose 
elsewhere, but it seems to me there is more bark than 
bite, as animosity is quickly lost in sleep. One un- 
fortunate animal had a badly torn nose, in all prob- 
ability a dental evidence of past troubles. One of 
the crew gave me a tooth some seven inches in length, 
the greater portion of which lies within the gum (e. 
g., 4.9 inches). When disturbed the belching of each 
of these old bulls was objectionably strong, for it 
can scarcely be called a roar. So great is the exer- 
tion that blood appears in the pharynx, and this oc- 
curred when I was engaged near its head, measuring 
the trough in which it lay. This lair along the con- 
vex part was thirty-two feet in length the breadth 
seven feet, tapering toward each end. The depth of 
these, mostly dry mud holes placed among the 
grasses, ranges to about two feet, seldom deeper: 
but they are placed in natural depressions — i. e.. extra 
to the artificial ones. Many of the troughs are con- 
tinuous and intersect each other, so that a large lair 
may appear netted, which is uncommon. In one trough 
there are often two bulls or two cows, the broad part 
of one and the tapering part of another at one end, 
and the corresponding parts towards the opposite 
pole. This insures the trough being well filled. 



This place soon showed an unfortunate change 
Uitles were presented within six feet of each bull, and 
the bullet sped through the brain box, partly llatten- 
ing on the blubber of the opposite side. Now, slits 
with sharp knives are run dorsally in the long direc- 
tion, and out rushes venous-like blood to stain the 
little bay in a few minutes. From one seal some 
sixty fountains of blood rose in oblique directions to 
a height of two feet, and all from the single cut on 
the back. Against the skyline this miniature double 
line of fountains looked strange, and the spray of a 
city corporation van is not to be compared to its deli- 
cate and colored sprayings. In the viscera I was 
surprised at the length of the small intestine, which 
I found to be 255 feet in length and capable of rough 
haulage. It stood the pulling over the grass from the 
carcass with only a small distension. 

The methods of procuring elephants is a simple, 
though not an easy one. Three boats, each with a 
crew of five men, row from the anchorage to the 
shore, haul up their boats, prospect the field, and 
with four loaded rifles drive the animals down to 
within a few yards of high water mark and shoot 
them. There they lie for the coming of the tide, and 
get anchored temporarily in a few reet of water. 

Some of the seals give considerable trouble before 
they will leave the high lands (100 yards from the 
beach on a medium incline), and as many as three 
hours may be spent in annoying them with the lance 
before they decide to go. If the seals carry their own 
skins down it saves more labor and time of the men. 
The boating is quite enough trouble to bear, as the 
harbor winds are treacherous and strong; so power- 
ful are they, that I have observed half the body of 
a 'waterfall" blown back many yards before it could 
leave the ledge where gravity was strongest. Should 
a gale prohibit the boats from leaving the ship, the 
crew will sleep in during the day. and with the lull 
toward midnight leave for the scene of operations. 
Many a time they have had to row miles against a 
tempest to save being out all night, and many hours 
it has taken. Under such conditions, boats have been 
swamped, the skins floated overboard, and a landing 
arranged for fresh efforts. I shall not be likely to 
forget one cold night while going on board with my 
birds and cameras. The helmsman got a renewed at- 
tack of tropical fever, and, almost collapsing, I was 
given charge of the helm. For three hours mittens 
and oilskins seemed like miserable calico, and then I 
fully sympathized with the men who had their Wel- 
lingtons partly filed with icy water. 

Daily the boats wend their way in much the same 
manner, and in exactly the same way the skins are 
taken from the bodies. Roughly speaking, each skill- 
. ful man can skin the smaller seals — ten in two hours 
and a half, or fifteen minutes for each. This time is 
for animals which are not too large for a man to 
handle. The carcasses in our takings were generally 
of large size. The following is a case of quick work: 
After a 1 o'clock dinner (of plum duff) the boats were 
rowed three miles. Seventy-two seals were killed, 
and all but fourteen skinned. Twenty-three of the 
largest were taken on board, and the last was upon 
the windlass at 9:30 p. m. Two skins of fair size are 
enough for a small boat, or one of a large bull. The 
last trip in the above raid took two hours and a half 
in rowing three miles: this wasted time and much 
more was spent in endeavoring to get around a cer- 
tain point. We agreed without a dissenting voice to 
call this headland Cape Horn of Royal Sound. 

This uncharitable point is the type of many an- 
other. To leave a harbor for a second one is the 
event most trying to the constitution, for one never 
knows until the anchor is safely dropped where the 
howling wind will drive you. Altogether we tried six 
harbors, of which four were well worked. The fifth 
(Swain's Bay) took us three days to enter, and after 
being ten minutes inside trying to get up the chan- 
nel, our clever captain put his ship about, and 
thanked his lucky star he had got safely out of the 
treacherous "hole." Down this fiord the wind with- 
out notice struck the foresails, while the wind astern 
drove her forward. Here the trouble started, but for- 
tunately quickly ended by good management and 
good fortune. Had we touched the entrance island 
the ship would at once have been broken into match- 
wood. 

From this place I carried pleasant recollections, 
more on account of the bold contour and strangeness 
of the island than because it pleased my friends to 
chart it as a tribute to myself. Strange as it may 
read, among the finding of shipwreck remains there 
were letters and bottles from a sealing captain men- 
tioned in Prof. Moseley's "Challenger Notes" twenty 
years ago. Captain Fuller is an old hand at the bus- 
iness, and evidently has the indomitable pluck of the 
American in the making and losing of fortunes in 
rough waters! As for ourselves, we managed to quit 
the land safely on February IS. although for a few 
hours we could not get over a severe loss we made at 
the last moment. Having on the 17th killed, skin- 
ned and anchored a batch of skins to the value of 
$1860, all hands on board heaved anchors next morn- 
ing to stand into a near bay to take them off. Two 
storms now showed their effects; one in driving all 
the skins ashore and burying them in the sand: the 
other in driving us off the bay altogether. 

With a threatening sky our tight and dry little 
brig, the Edward, now headed for Melbourne, and we 
started a direct homeward course of 3 400 miles. 
This was duly accomplished in twenty-two days, and 
we experienced a phenomenal wind for the last four- 
teen days, which was from the north instead of the 
prevailing one from the west, a circumstance of ex- 
cel lingly rare occurrence. 

1 — o 

In hot weather there is no drink like Jackson's 
Napa Soda — plain or in a lemonade. 



January 6, HG'6] 



9 



GRAND STEELH EAD FISHING IN RUSSIAN 
RIVER. 

For more than two weeks past Russian River at 
Duncan's Mills, on the line of the North Shore rail- 
road in Sonoma county, has been the Mecca of a large 
number of enthusiastic devotees of angling. 

This famous steelhead fishing resort is at present 
developing the best output of piscatorial sport that 
has ensued for about eight years past. Each fall, 
when the run of steelheads is due from the ocean, 
much concern is manifested by the sportsmen as to 
the position of the bar — whether its sandy portals 
will be thrust aside or not, if the weather conditions 
will be in favorable conjunction with the ingress of 
the game fish from the salt water, and also if the 
rains due at this season of the year will hold off long 
enough for the anglers to take advantage of the sport 
promised by the combination of favorable conditions. 
Each year, this has been anxiously awaited and scores 
of the fraternity have kept tab on current events in 
this particular respect. For about eight seasons past 
the angling horoscope was each year overcast with 
one or more disrupting conditions and what fishing 
there was — none at all for one or two years we be- 
lieve — kept the brothers of the angle nerved up to the 
• possibilities of full enjoyment when the turn came 
right Memories of several grand fishing years made 
the veterans bide their time with a patience that now 
has been rewarded most bountifully, for the past two 
weeks has not been exceeded by any similar fishing 
time of prior seasons in the memory of the oldest 
veteran of the rod among them all. 

The good thing came off on Thursday, December 
21st, when the bar at the river's mouth, about four 
miles from Duncan's Mills, opened for good. Efforts 
had been made three times before that by interested 
parties to open the bar by digging until the outgoing 
volume was heavy enough to cut a channel for the 
fish to run up into the stream. Each of these at- 
tempts were futile, for the huge breakers closed up 
the openings and put a blanket temporarily on the 
hopes of many ardent anglers. On Thursday after- 
noon, however, the pent-up waters of the river rushed 
through the sand bar obstruction and the river went 
down eight feet that night, leaving the stream low 
and clear with sufficient water in the famous Austin 
pool, located some distance below the railroad bridge, 
for the fish to loaf in comfortably until the winter 
freshets raise the river high enough to enable access 
to the spawning grounds of the tributary streams far 
up in the mountain ranges. 

The big speckled steelheads were seen going over 
the riffles up stream, after the bar broke, in big 
schools. The fish are in splendid condition and 
fiends for fighting this year. Small fish are the ex- 
ception. The weights of over 500 fish already taken 
by rod and line running from eight to twelve pounds. 
This run of fish is about three weeks later than 
usual this season. The fish were often seen in the 
ocean off the bar. close to the river's mouth, where 
the fresh water seeping through the sand kept them 
waiting for the letting down of the barrier. Whilst 
the schools were outside the sea lions ravaged the 
gathered finny hosts; when they finally swam up 
stream the trolling spinner and the roe-baited double 
hook awaited them. 

This run of fish, both in quality, size and numbers, 
is an annual occurrence. What makes the sport at 
present so entrancing to the Waltonians is that 
weather and water conditions for the spcrt are ideal. 
In consequence every rodster in this city who could 
get away made post haste for the battleground. Some 
of the fishermen have made or will make two or more 
trips, for the sport will only last until the rains 
come and the game is over. The rising and roily 
waters bar fishing, and the fish will pass on up to the 
furthermost gravel beds accessible. After spawning 
they return to the ocean waters again, spent and 
out of condition — "razorbacks," they are dubbed — i 
with all the fight taken out of them, unfitted for table 
or rod and line. 

Tuesday, December 25th, in the Austin pool, the 
kingpin fishing water of the river, a spot about five 
acres in area, there was a flotilla of twenty-five boats 
in which were thirty anglers, among them a lady rod 
enthusiast. Most of the fishers were trolling. The 
favorite outfit for the troller is a first-class split 
bamboo rod, from eight and a half to twelve ounces 
in weight and nine to twelve feet in length, the reel 
seat either above or below the grip as the angler 
favors. A reel that holds at least 200 yards of Wil- 
son dyed braided silk line, a heavy three-foot salmon 
leader to which is attached, generally, a No. 4 Wilson 
spinner, all copper or copper and silver. Some fish- 
ermen accent this lure with a red Benn or Wilson 
fly tied on a two of three sproat hook. When a fish 
strikes and is hooked the occupant of the boat makes 
for shore with his craft immediately. Stepping on the 
bank, the fish is then played and finally brought to 
gaff. This is the orthodox manner of taking a steel- 
head. Everybody, however, is not so proficient, and 
then a fish is "mauled," that is, pulled up to the boat, 
or ashore, any old way. With the novice, excitement 
has much to do in the breach of angling ethics, much 
to the disgust of the veterans and dilettanti, who have 
the highest regard for the locality, the sport, and its 
traditions, and who consider infractions of sacred 
angling custom and usage almost as personal affront. 

Some anglers prefer fishing from the banks. This 
style is generally bottom fishing. The fisherman uses 
a No. 2-0 double hook baited with a generous-sized 
gob of salmon roe instead of the spinner. Some men 
use two hooks on the leader, but one is considered 
sufficient by most anglers. The spinner is used for the 
bankside also, but this style requires cast after cast 
into the river and is only resorted to by the enthusi- 
ast who cannot secure a boat. 

Sunday, December 24th, there was a heavy tide, over 
six feet, the inrushing flood carrying everything with 



it. The boats drifted upstream instead of the usual 
direction. 

Everybody a I Duncan's has taken fish. Among 
those who were there and the number of fish reported 
last week were: W. H. Hillegas 7, Raish Terry 6, 
Sam Wells 21, Black Jack Lemmer and J. Hayden 
Butter 16, Dave Harefield 6. Jack Sammi 9, Bert 
Spring S, Harry Leap 6, Frank Marcus, Charles Brei- 
denstein and Bob Eaton 14. J M. Thomson 11, M. 
Cross, Alex. T. Vogelsang, John P. Babcock (formerly 
chief deputy fish commissioner). R. W. McFarland and 
Charles W. Bond S. 

James Thomson fished from 1 o'clock the first Sun- 
day afternoon until 2 o'clock Monday afternoon before 
he landed a fish. He is noted for staying qualities. 
By Wednesday he had eleven fish that scaled 145 
pounds, and was the best looking lot of steelheads 
landed up to that time. One 14-pound fish made a 
run that took out 400 feet of line. Alex Vogelsang 
hooked on to a lusty 12-pounder that gave him a battle 
for twenty-five minutes before he was beaten. Vogel- 
sang is voted as artistic and thorough an angler in 
playing a fish as can be seen. A noticeable feature of 
the present steelhead fest is that the female fish put 
up the most strenuous fights when hooked. That the 
fish are exceedingly lively ones is shown in the fact 
that numerous fish that struck got away before being 
securely hooked. Al Wilson, than whom there is no 
better angler on the river, got ten strikes one morning 
and hooked but three of the fish. 

The published statement that "men and boys" were 
spearing and tossing fish out of the river with pitch- 
forks is not borne out by facts. 

The record for the present week is a reiteration of 
the gratifying experiences of the opening week of 
the fishing. Among the new rods on the river this 
week and a partial list of fish caught were: C. P. 
Medeau, Hart Williams, Bert Harwood 9, C. B. Holly- 
wood 4, Ed. Conlin 5, L. Rondeau 4, Fish Commis- 
sioner W. E. Gerber of Sacramento 9, Al. Hall 8, 
Bert Spring 6, Frank Marcus 6, J. M. Thompson 6, 
S. A. Wells, 35 all told; Manuel Cross, a total of 40; 
Dave Harifield and son, 12; W. C. Stevens 9. L. Bou- 
tellier about 40 altogether. Jack Lemmer, John But- 
ler, J. Dougall, Al. Wilson and Bob Sangster are re- 
puted to have taken a total of 90 or more; Alex. 
Vogelsong and John P. Babeoe:- have done equally 
as well, Dr. Morgan. Harry Coon, W. A. L. Miller, 
W. F. Hillegass, James Lynch, Joseph Uri, W. C. 
Street, Joseph Pincus, George Wentworth and many 
others. 

J. Butler landed a 22-pound fish, one of the largest 
taken this season. Al. Wilson caught a 13-pound 
striped bass with salmon roe. Vogelsang went him 
a few points better when he landed a 20-pound striped 
bass. Frank Marcus believes in variety for he hook- 
ed a six-inch flounder which tried to get away with 
his salmon roe bait. '"Raisch" Terry has the proud 
distinction of hooking and landing two steelheads at 
once; they weighed 15 and 9 pounds respectively. 
Whilst this mixup was taking place Terry's fight 
was watched by a score of brother anglers. 

Much as the Golden State needs rain, we fear that 
not a few anglers are fervently praying that the rain 
may keep off "for just a few days more — we never 
had such fishing in our lives before," as one fisher- 
man put it. Taking the game all in all the anglers 
are to be congratulated, for it may be many seasons 
again until such phenomenally good fishing will be 
had in Russian River. 

Illegal to Kill Wild Swans. 

Contrary to the general impression among the 
sportsmen of this State it is a violation of the game 
laws to kill one of the graceful birds. 

It appears that the provision making it a misde- 
meanor to kill a swan at any time of year was in- 
serted in the game laws only at the last session of 
the Legislature of this State, and it was not embraced 
in the new game laws as published by the State Game 
Association. The section -is as follows. 

' Section 626 — Relating to swans, pheasants, bob- 
white and imported quail. 

"Every person who takes, kills, or destroys, or has 
in his possession any swan, or any pheasants, or any 
bob-white quail, or any variety of imported quail or 
partridge, is guilty of a misdeameanor. Approved 
March 18. 1905." 

Fatal Result From a Common Custom. 

A press dispatch from Los Angeles announces a 
hunting casualty which was caused by an act of 
carelessness that is altogether too common. The fact 
that more accidents from this cause — the throwing 
of a bird into a boat or a wagon, etc., are not re- 
ported, may be attributed as much to good luck as 
anything else. The practice is entirely too much in 
vogue and what may ensue in the line of fatal or ser- 
ious injury can be readily understood by the follow- 
ing story, that if proper caution — and common sense 
had been used would never have appeared in print: 

Lying on a cot at the Woodside Hospital in Los 
Angeles, Miles Crane hovers between life and death, 
the victim of a peculiar shooting accident. In com- 
pany with five other men, Crane went out early in 
the morning of December 31st to shoot ducks on 
Alamitos Bay. There were two boats in use. Crane 
was alone in one of these. Each of the two parties 
secured a string of ducks, and finally one of the men 
shot an unusually fine duck, which fell near the boat. 
He paddled over to it and determined to give it to 
Cane in the other boat. Pulling it out of the water, 
he threw it over to Cane. As it fell into the boat it 
struck a gun lying on the seat. The gun was dis- 
charged and the entire charge struck Cane in the 
breast, tearing a fearful hole close to the heart. He 
cannot live. 

o 

Strike — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 
when you ask for it. 



FIELD TRIAL WINNERS OF 1905. 

Results of two trials, supplementary to list of wit 
ners published in the Breeder & Sportsman, Decen 
ber 23, 1905. 

Eastern Field Trial Club. — Twenty-seventh annua 
trials. Waynesboro, Ga.. December 12, 1905. W. W. 
Titus, West Point, Miss., and Theo. Sturgess, Green- 
field Hills, Conn., judges; Theo. Sturges, acting secre- 
tary. 

Derby — Purse $500, 3 moneys, 50, 30 and 20 per 
cent. Entrance $10, second forfeit $10, $10 additional 
to start, 18 starters (12 English Setters, 6 Pointers). 

Winners — I Ria Baby, black, white and tan Eng- 
lish Setter bitch (Col. R. — Monterey) H. R. Edwards, 
owner; J. Gude, handler. 2 Alford's King, black and 
white Pointer dog (Alford's John — Belle Rip Rap) 
W. R. Lyon, owner; E. S. M.'unger, handler. 3 Miss 
Ransom, black, white and tan English Setter bitch 
(Uncle B. — Sport's Belle), H. R. Edwards, owner; 
J. Gude, handler. 

All Age. — December 13. open to all Pointers and 
Setters, non-winners of first in the Elastern Conti- 
nental or United States trials. Purse $500, 3 moneys, 
50, 30 and 20 per cent. Entrance $10, $20 additional 
to start, 11 starters (8 English Setters, 3 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Hard Cash, liver and white Pointer 
dog (Young Jingo— lBrown's Bella Pointer), A. M . 
Masters, owner; E. Shelley, handler. 2 Lanark Lad. 
orange and white English Setter dog (Tony Boy — 
Pink Tea), F. W. Scott, owner; J. Bishop, handler. 
3 Jesse Rodfield's Count Gladstone, orange and white 
English Setter dog (Lady's Count Gladstone — Jessie 
Rodfield), Jesse Sherwood, owner; E. Shelley hand- 
ler. 

Subscription Stake. — December 16, Purse $400, 3 
moneys, 50, 30 and 20 per cent. Entrance $50. Two 
hour heats in first series, 6 starters (5 English Set- 
ters, 1 Pointer). 

Winners. — 1 Pioneer, orange and white English 
Setter dog (Count Whitestone — Bonnie Doone), G. N. 
Clemson, owner; E. Shelley, handler. 2 Lemon's 
Rodfield, black, white and tan English Setter ddg 
(Rodfield — Fleetwing), J. Lemon, owner; J. Bishop, 
handler. 3 Hard Cash. 

Alabama Field Trial Club. — Huntsville. Ala., De- 
cember 18. Major J. M. Taylor and Col. Nick Taylor, 
judges; J. M. Kirkpatrick, Huntsville, Alabama, sec- 
retary. 

Derby. — For dogs owned in Alabama. Purse, fees; 
3 moneys, 50, 25 and 15 per cent. Entrance $5, 9 
starters (5 English Setters, 4 Pointers). 

Winners. — Navajo, black, white and tan English 
Setter bitch (Uncle Sam — Petti Sing), D. E. Rose, 
owner and handler. 2 Vashti, black, white and tan 
English Setter bitch (Jessie Rodfield's Count Glad- 
stone — Lady Josephine), F. M. de Graffenreid, owner; 
J. Bishop, handler. 3 St. Elmo, liver and white 

Pointer dog ( ), C. F. Eastham, owner 

and handler. 

All Age. — (December 18. Purse, fees; 3 moneys, 50. 
25 and 15 per cent. Entrance $5. For dogs owned in 
Alabama, winners of first at any trials prior to Sep- 
tember 1, 1905, barred. Ten starters (4 English Set- 
ters, 6 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Stix. lemon and white Pointer dog 
(Jingo's Light — Nellie O.), C. F. Eastham, owner and 
handler. 2 Romeo, black, white and tan English 

Setter dog ( ), J. E. Gaston, owner; D.' 

Ei Rose, handler. Equal 3, Miss Vic Stone, black, 
white and tan English Setter bitch (Victor Okaw — 
Ruby Danstone), C N. Robinson, owner; D. C. White, 
handler. Equal 3, Blanche, liver and white Pointer 

bitch ( ), C. N. Robinson, owner; D. C. 

White, handler. 

Free-For-AIl. — December 19. Purse, $300; 3 mon- 
eys, 60, 30 and 10 .per cent. Entrance $10, $10 to 
start. 13 starters (6 English Setters, 7 Pointers). 

Winners — 1 Lanark Lad. 2 Baby Ale, liver and 
white Pointer bitch (Jingo's Coin— -Fanny Ale), Geo. 
Cooper, owner; D. E. Rose, handler. 3 Alford's 
King. 

o 

Cclor of Cocker Spaniels. 

"Le Chasseur Franeais" writes as follows on the 
colors of cockers in vogue in Franc;-: "Nothing must 
be neglected which tends to make dog breeding per- 
fectly correct, in order that, when one continues an 
undertaken task, he knows perfectly well the way he 
is going. I think, therefore, that a good constituted 
pedigree, no matter which breed it represents, must 
mention the color of the coat of the ascendants as far 
back as possible. All the Spaniel men konw that, In 
order to obtain nice specimens, as homogeneous as 
possible, it is necessary to mate two Cockers of the 
'same type.' but not of the same color, which is of 
small Importance All the colors are admitted — uni- 
COlored, bi-colored and tri-eolored; the study, then - 
fore, which I am going to submit to our readers is 
not out of place here, in order to enlighten the novice 
who is not au courant with this question, and whom 
the latter may interest. 

"Grand surprises are in store for the amateur mat- 
ing Cockers, from the point of view of type, as well 
as from that of color: therefore, I am going to show 
some 'odclnesses' of mating and the conc lusions which 
this mating admits. It often happens that the mating 
of two Cockers, white and brown, produces white and 
orange colored — this latter is very rare and, in my 
opinion, very nice, if the animal be typic al; the mating 
of two different colors, where there Is no orange- 
white, produces, nevertheless, this last color. Here 
are some examples: Young Keel Coat, white and 
brown, and Miss du ChalllOt, black; progeny, one 
orange-white, one orange, one white-brown. Young 
Red Coat, while and brown; Felle of Naze, white and 
brown; progeny, one orange-white, four white-brown. 
Echo of Fontainebleau. brown and blue; Felle of Naze, 
white and brown: progeny, two white and brown; 



10 



[Januahy <> iy(0 



i ir-.l<.t dp Fontainebleau. brown and 

and brown, one orange-white. 

2 white-orange color issued from parent* of white 

'"""In S dogs are well known, registered prize 
All tne.e u "f n uetn judiciously made 

winners, and the matings n«^e * them, 

.koi iVilu ascendant has bequeathed to his greai. 

, v sooner get Cockers of white-orange color than 
na ting a white-orange Cocker with a white-brown 
ne fo instance. Boxeur de la Clerlssa.s onvnge- 
hite Darkie de Paris, white-brown; progen>. white-. 
borwn). The same dog with Meg. a brown b.tch, 
produced white-brow n and brow n. 

A JSSmS! wWo"; many years has been the lead- 
InJ exflS or and breeder of English MMjg 
atmounced his intention some time ago of "nitting 
Bull Terriers and taking up "Bostons." so states H. 
W I y Mr. Dole is now employed by Myron W. 
Rob m on 'to take charge of the Rob Roy Presto ken- 
nels on the bench show circuit. Mr Dole to MM 
of his kennel of Bull Terriers, and has just sold two 
o nem Edgewood Seymour and Edgewood Ring- 
master to President Roosevelt. Seymour took two 
rst and two special prizes at the -cent show g 
Philadelphia. He is eight months old, weighs 4o 
Lunds and is pure white. He is by Edgewood 
Bloomsburg Hero, dam Lillian Russell. Ringmaster 
s al"o white, is two years old and a prize winner. 
President Roosevelt paid $150 apiece for the dogs, so 
it was stated. 

A Small Eoston Terrier. 

What is claimed to be the tiniest Boston Terrier in 
existence is owned by Mr. J Carr of Cl.ftondale. 
Mass This wee might of a dog weighed but twelve 
ounces when whelped and at ten weeks old had just 
about doubled its weight. The pigmy is nicely marked 
and is by Bob Tiverton ex Terror. 

c, n Francisco Kennel Club. 

The Bprlng show it is reported will he held in th.s 
cits during the early part of next May. 

It is possible that Mr. George Roper will be seen 
in the ring again this year He was here In 1903 and 
m ule many friends among the. fancy. He knows a 
,log as well as any man living. His decisions here in 
1903 were favorably regarded by. with only the in- 
evitable few exceptions, every one interested in the 
show. 

Victoria Kennsl Club. 

The following officers were elected at a recent 
meeting of the Victoria Kennel Club: Dr. A. J. 
Oaresehe, president: YV. YVimsby, secretary: G. F 
Dunn treasurer; Messrs. Florence. Fairfull. Haggard 
and Hodgson, directors; Messrs. Haggard, Dunn, An- 
gus Florence and Hodgson. Bench Show committee. 



friends in his plans for 'cross-country riding with 
the hounds twice a week during the season. Intelli- 
gent creatures as they are, the dogs have been trained 
to follow a drag, am! it is plafond to have some of 
the party go out the day before, dragging a not too 
easy route, with several checks, starting from Orange 
Grove avenue, and winding up probably at the Pasa- 
dena Country Club Or, a good ten-mile course could 
be laid out from the Arroyo to Hollywood. 

Of course the affairs will partake of a more or less 
social nature, and hot breakfast will be waiting at 
the Country Club or at the hotel in Hollywood, as 
the run carried the riders. 

Some of the most socially prominent women of the 
West Side are accomplished equestriennes, and the 
announcement of the 'cross-country sport has been 
received with the greatest enthusiasm. 

Fancier Burns hopes with "Doctor Harry" and 
"Hero" to develop the first pack of fox hounds ever 
raised in Southern California. 



pn serve near oleta Station, in the Suisun marsh. 
Members of the Family Duck Club, Phil B. Bekeart, 
Frank Moroney, Louis Titus, Bush Finnell and others, 
have had grand shooting in the club ponds adjoining 
the Oelrichs preserves. On the Cordelia, Teal, Ibis 
and Bay club grounds in that locality the shooting 
has been equally good. Dan Hanlon and other mem- 
bers of the Belvedere Gun Club have kept up the 
reputation of the Joyce Island ponds as a duck pro- 
ducing district 

Limit bags have been numerous at the Alameda 
Gun Club ponds near McOills, canvasback were plen- 
tiful and in good condition. 

Near Reclamation station, the members of the 
Lincoln Gun Club have recently had much good duck 
shooting, teal, widgeon and canvasback furnished the 
shooters a number of limit hags. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 

For the sportsmen who resort to the southerly 
shores of San Francisco bay. the adjacent marshes 
and the hills of the Santa Clara valley, duck and 
quail shooting has been recently of a most enjoyable 
nature. 

In the vicinity of San Jose, for instance, each day 
finds hundreds of nimrods scattered over the sur- 
rounding hills and marshes. On Sundays the hunters 
are more numerous and the birds on land and water 
are kept on the wing. Nearly every species of duck 
is found on the marsh lands within a few miles of 
that city. Spoonbill and teal, however, predominate. 
Mallard, canvasback, widgeon, sprig, whistlers and 
■ pin-lair' are among the varieties found. The lack 
of fresh feed is now apparent, however, In the con- 
dition of many ducks, the mallards particularly. 

This week has offered better inducements to the 
duck hunter than the previous one, owing to the fact 



Pacific Coast Trials. 

The twenty-third annual trials of the Pacific Coast 
Field Trial Club will commence on Monday next with 
the Members' Stake, followed by the Derby, All-Age, 
and Champion Stakes. 

Birds are plentiful on the grounds and other con- 
ditions are equally favorable to the running of a 
highly successful meeting. 

The Derby is full of rich promise, for the entries 
comprise a classy lot of young dogs, the equal of any 
similar stake nominations this season. 

The attendance of members and sportsmen inter- 
ested will be a representative one Altogether the 
meeting bids fair to eclipse any previous trials in 
the history of the club. 

Fox Hounds in Southern California. 

The first and only pack of real old Kentucky Fox 
Hounds in Southern California reached Pasadena one 
day last November, and some great rides 'cross-coun- 
try behind the fleet-footed dogs are planned by the 
owner and his friends for this winter season. 

Seven there are in the bunch, and as likely a lot 
of musical scent-chasers as ever came out of their 
native confines in the Bluegrass State. The dogs are 
the property of William G. Burns, of No 727 South 
Orange Grove avenue. 

In the pack are three bitches and four dogs — their 
very names are redolent of the chase and its accom- 
paniments and out-of-doors — "Lady Jean." "Hero," 
"Cliquot Brut," "Doctor Harry," "Bartender," "Out- 
rider" and "Tallyho." 

They are of the Williams strain and left their Lex- 
ington kennels not over two months ago. To give 
the pedigree of the pack would be a task but suffice 
it to say that part of the bunch were sired by "Bour- 
bon," who won first place in the Brunswick Fur Club 
gpe (1 trials In Old Kentucky last October. In addiilion 
to this the sire of "Tallyho," "Hero" and "Doctor 
Harry" is many times a bench show prize winner. The 
others were sired by "Champion Ranger." whose pedi- 
gree is said to contain the names of more champions 
'than any other Fox Hound in America. 

Mr. Burns has included a number of his West Side 




AL. 



M CCMMING AND FttED BUSHNELL 
Field and Tule Club 



It is not often that the waters nestling under the 
lee of the Solano hills become so rough that hunters 
are prevented from putting out to the blinds or are 
driven ashore by stress of weather. Such, however, 
was the experience of William C. Swain and Fred S. 
Johnson, two well-known trigger pullers of this city, 
who essayed to put a limit crimp In fat mallards 
and canvashacks that were seeking shelter in the 
ponds and open waters behind the levees of the Mon- 
tezuma Gun Club preserve last Sunday. A howling 
norther swept down from over the foothills, lashing 
the open waters of the river conjunction and Suisun 
hay into hummocks of muddy colored seas that drove 
thousands of ducks to the lee shore ponds. Setting 
out in tule splitters the two hunters soon found that 
navigation was hazardous and extremely laborious. 
Running the frail craft into the first nearby point of 
tules, they tried to get a shoot, after putting out 
the decoys after a fashion Ducks were plentiful and 
the shooting was steady and fast. Efforts to re- 
trieve the birds were futile, for after one or two at- 
tempts at getting the boats out of the blinds to pick 
up fallen birds the work was found so difficult that 
the shoot was given up. 

On the return trip the gale had increased to such 
a boisterous extent that the hunters found it ex- 
pedient and safe to make the nearest shore point 
as quickly as possible. Abandoning the boats they 
had to ride shank's mare several miles back to the 
clubhouse. The water where they were shooting was 
not more than four feet deep at any place, but the 
seas kicked up would soon have sunk any skiff or 
tule-splitter. I fthe hunters had been lucky enough 
to have kept afloat the fierce wind would have driven 
I hem across the open water into the tules, where they 
would have been Involuntary prisoners out in the 
keen and cutting cold wind until the subsidence of 
the gale. Mr. and Mrs W. W. Richards, Channing 
Mansfield and Walter D. Mansfield were also at the 
Montezuma ponds on Sunday. Shooting in more shel- 
tered positions they were enabled to bag good strings 
of ducks in a more comfortable manner. Mr. Rich- 
ards also bagged on a nearby snipe patch a fine string 
of the dainty longbills. 



Reports from the vicinity of Davisville state that 
wild ducks in thousands are resorting to the alfalfa 
fields thereabouts for food Hunters in that section 
have no difficulty In making many limit bags. 

Otto M. Feudner, Ed Feudner. H. Lorber and W. 
G. Hoffman bagged enough geese at the Feudner ranch 
at Dixon last Sunday to till half a dozen sacks. Geese 
are now plentiful in Solano. Yolo, Colusa and Glenn 
counties — they are to be found in some localities by 
the tens of thousands. A H. Ashley, a Stockton 
sportsman, recently shot a honker goose that weighed 
I si;, pounds, a pretty heavy goose indeed, if the report 
is correct. 



that the tide was running more to his advantage. 
That is, he had an outgoing tide with which to carry 
him to the hunting grounds in his ducking boat and 
a Hood tide to easily work back home on. 

On the Alviso marshes the birds are plentiful, many 
limit bags having been shot at the bridges. 

Reports from George Wade and John Chisholm, of 
Alviso, who have the renting of duck boats, state 
that this season has seen a larger exodus of hunters 
on the marshes surrounding that town than any pre- 
vious year. They also report that many who have 
previously done land shooting have been taking to 
boats and are meeting with much better success. 

The boat hunting is done mostly with sneak boats, 
which are propelled by the use of a sculling oar. An 
expert can push this small craft to within ten yards 
of a flock of ducks without disturbing them. 

Many parties of Santa Clara Valley hunters will 
take advantage of the closing days of the season, and 
even a greater number of huntsmen than have gone 
gunning during the past few weeks will find their 
way to the foothills and marshes before February 15. 

W ith quite a number the impression prevails that 
both rain and stormy weather are necessary to bring 
about good duck shooting conditions Generally 
speaking such is the requirement for the enjoyment 
of this particular sport by local shotgun sharps, but 
the prevailing cold weather and northerly winds have 
Induced conditions for the powder burners that in 
many sections are almost ideal, particularly so on the 
northern bay shore salt marshes and the upriver 
tule sections of the Sacramento and San Joaquin. 

Members of the Field and Tule Club who shoot 
near Cordelia station, have recently shot many limit 
bags of ducks. Vallejo and Napa sportsmen have also 
bad their share of feathered game, particularly can- 
vasback ducks. Last Sunday Harry C. Golcher shot 
as the guest of Hermann Oelrichs at the latter's 



Duck hunting in the vicinity of Moss Landing is 
good enough and of sufficient variety to tempt Santa 
Cruz Sportsmen to make frequent trips to that locality. 

(in Klkhnrn slough the Empire Gun Club members 
get limit bags enough to maintain the reputation of 
the preserve as one of the best in that part of the 
State. 



A case of great interest to the hunters of Napa 
and Sonoma counties particularly and to the sports- 
men at large was instituted In the Superior Court 
of Sonoma county last week. The Santa Rosa Gun 
Club, composed of prominent residents of Santa Rosa, 
obtained a temporary injunction against John Ken- 
nedy and L J. Flanagan, well-known duck hunters 
of Napa, to restrain them from hunting and fishing 
on their property In the marshes about San Pablo 
bay The Santa Rosa Club has reserved a large 
amount of property In the marshes, comprising por- 
tions of the Filippini and Smith places, for hunting. 

The injunction, if granted and made permanent, 
would restrain Napa hunters and others as well from 
hunting or fishing in tide water. They claim they 
have a right to hunt and have employed counsel from 
Napa to defend them. The two men will appear in 
the Superior Court at Santa Rosa to show cause why 
they should not be restrained from hunting and fish- 
ing in the territory mentioned. 



Striped Bass Angling. 

San Antonio slough is yet producing a fair amount 
of sport for the clam casters. The cold north winds, 
however, are not conducive to a comfortable day on 
the marsh waters. Among the numerous anglers at 
the creek last Sunday was Al M. Cumming, whose 
largest fish was a beauty, w-eighing 23 pounds. Emil 
Aceret s two fish were 8% and 9% pounds respectively. 
Nat Mead landed a 9 pounder. 



Marked Salmon in Columbia River. 

What is believed to be the best evidence of the effi- 
ciency of artificial propagation of salmon that has 
ever been secured was recently obtained by Fish Com- 



January 6 190(1 1 



11 



missioned Kershaw of Oregon relative to the opera- 
tion of hatcheries on the Columbia river. Mr. Ker- 
shaw received tails and fins of 100 salmon from a 
single trap owner on the Columbia river that were 
plainly marked hatchery fish. 

When the hatcheries were placed in operation on 
the Columbian river a system of marking was adopt- 
ed for the purpose of ascertaining if any of the sal- 
mon turned out in the river returned to their native 
spawning grounds, and in what length -of time. 

The marked fins and tails received by Mr. Ker- 
shaw were found to be salmon that were turned out 
of the Kalama and Chinook hatcheries four years 
ago. The spawn of these fish was taken in 1900. and 
the young salmon turned out in 1901. The fish were 
marked in a manner that leaves no doubt of this 
fact. The small bones in the fins were cut down and 
a hole punched in the tail. The cutting of the bones 
in the fin is just the same as a man losing a part of 
his finger — it never grows out again. 

The Columbia river was practically depleted of 
salmon when the artificial propagtaion of the fish was 
commenced on that stream, and the past several years 
has demonstrated that it has been restocked by some 
means. 

While only a part of the fish were marked when 
released from the hatcheries, the fact that one trap 
owner on the river found at least 100 of these salmon 
during the past season is conclusive evidence that 
artificial propagation is the only solution of the prob- 
lem to prevent the depletion of the salmon fisheries. 

Mr. Kershaw asked a number of the Columbia river 
cannerymen and trap owners to watch for the marked 
• salmon, but during the rush of the season it was ap- 
parently overlooked, as only one response has been 
received. 

TRADE NOTES. 



Wallace Boyer, Sewickley, Pa , third amateur average, 
177 out of 200. shooting "DuPont." L. Z. Lawrence, 
of Pittsburg, second general average, 18 5out of 200, 
shooting "Infallible." 

Omaha, Neb., December 12th and 13th.— The threu 
highest averages were all won by amateurs, shooting 
"DuPont": William Veach of Falls City, Neb., first 
average, 387 out of 400; Geo. W. Maxwell of Holstein, 
Neb , third average, 379 out of 400. 

York, Pa., December 13th. — Fred Gilbert, first gen- 
eral average, 192 out of 200, shooting "DuPont." Neaf 
Apgar. third general average, 176 out of 200, shooting 
"DuPont." N. M. McSherry of York, Pa., second 
amateur average. 167 out of 200, shooting "DuPont." 
Andy Somers of Delta, Pa., third amateur average. 
166 out of 200. shooting "DuPont " 

Lebanon, Pa., December 14th. — Fred Gilbert, first 
general average, 132 out of 140. shooting "DuPont." 
E. M. Ludwick of Honeybrook, Pa., first amateur and 
second general average, shooting "DuPont." Neaf 
Apgar, third general average, shooting "DuPont." 
Geo. S Trafford oi' Lebanon, Pa., tied for third ama- 
teur average, shooting "New Schultze." 



Averages Reported. 

St. Mary's, Pa., December 4th.— Fred Gilbert, first 
general average, 144 out of 150. shooting DuPont. L. 
J. Squier, second general average. 139 out of 150, 
shooting ' DuPont." 

Lancaster, Pa., December 6th.— Fred Gilbert, first 
general average, 190 out of 200, shooting "DuPont." 

Bridgeton, X. J.. December 7th. — Fred Gilbert, first 
general average, 14S out of 150, shooting "DuPont." 
j a. R. Elliott, second general average, 142 out of 
150, shooting "New Schultze." H. B. Fisher of Phila- 
delphia. Pa., shooting "Infallible," won first amateur 
and tied with W. H. Heer. shooting DuPont, for third 
general average, 141 out of 150. T. D. Hackett, second 
amateur average, 139 out of 150, shooting "DuPont" 
F. J. Pratt, third amateur average, 134 out of 150, 
shooting "Infallible." Fred Gilbert made a run of 144 
straight. 

Atglen, December 8th. — W. H. Heer. shooting "New 
Schultze," and Neaf Apgar, shooting "DuPont," tied 
for first general average. 131 out of 140. J. A R. 
Elliott, second general average, 130 out of 140, shoot- 
ing "New Schultze." Fred Gilbert and L. J. Squier, 
tied for third general average, 129 out of 140, shooting 
"DuPont." 

Sewickley, Pa., December 9th.— G. E Kelsey of Pitts- 
burg, Pa., first general and first amateur average, 187 
out of 200, shooting "DuPont." H. C. Watson of 
Sewickley, Pa., 178 out of 200, shooting "DuPont." 



U. M. C. Banner Record at Phoenix. 

A successful blue rock tournament was held at 
Phoenix, Arizona, by the Phoenix Gun Club, on De- 
cember 28th, 29th, 30th and 31lst. 1905. Excellent 
management, good feeling and sportsmanlike methods 
marked the entire tournament. The attendance was 
highly satisfactory and the scores likewise. The visit- 
ing sportsmen were unanimous in the verdict as to 
the reception and tournament, all pronouncing the 
meet a most enjoyable occasion from every point of 
view. 

Mr. J. M. Aitken was winner of the high average 
for the first day's shoot, using U. M. C. shells. The 
Gwynn trophy was won by Messrs. Aitken, Tanner 
and Morrell, all using U. M C. shells. The Copper 
Queen trophy was won by Mr. Aitken. using U. M. C. 
shells with a score of 25 straight. Mr. Aitken also 
made the longest run on the first day of 68 straight. 

On the second day the winning contestants were 
Messrs. K L. Hart and W. D. Tanner, shooting for 
the individual championship of Arizona, both shooters 
Using U. M. (\ shells. The score was a tie — 47 out 
of 50 — on the shoot-off. Mr. Tanner won. Among 
the professional shooters in the above event, was 
Mr. R C. Reed, who distinguished himself with a 
score of 49 out of 50, using U. M. C. ammunition. 
At the end of the second day's shoot, M 1 '- Tanner had 
the high average, breaking 182 out of a possible 190, 
aii ! the longest run of 73 straight, using U. M. C. 
shells Mr. J. M. Aitken's phenomenal run of 94 
straight was one of the events of the entire tourna- 
ment, lie using IT. M. C. shells. 

The first prize in the merchandise shoot was won 
by Mr. W. D. Tanner, using U. M. C ammunition. 
The Associated Diamond Medal Team Championship 
was won by Messrs. Hart, Morrell, Aitken and Tanner, 
all users of the products of the Union Metallic Car- 
tridge Company. The Two-Man Team Medal was 
won by W. D. Purcell and A A. Jones, both using 
TJ. M. C. shells. The "Miss and Out" event for a 
purse of $80.00, was won by Mr. D E. Morrell, using 
U. M. C. "Acme" shells. The second high average 
for the entire tournament was won by Mr. W. D. 
Tanner with 94 1-5 per cent, using U. M. C. ammu- 
nition. 

It is an established fact that in all countries, not- 
ably in shooting, nerve and skill are prime requisites 
and those qualities must be backed by accuracy and 
reliability in ammunition used; consequently, little 



further than the statement of name or make of the 
successful shooter's choice of ammunition is necessary 
to establish those qualities that serve the shooter best 
in his time of need. On the Pacific Coast In Arizona, 
In the remote places in the interior, the record has 
been a proud one for the ever-reliable U. M. C. shells. 

Of course such matters have usually only local 
bearing, but In regard to U. M. C. goods it has been 
a repetition of successful championships, notably high 
scores and averages throughout the entire country 
wherever sportsmen could come to enjoy the fine sport 
of trap shooting From the north, east, west and 
south comes the same constant story of U. M. C. 
goods always to the lore. 

Winchester Goods on Top at Phoenix Tournament. 

The shooting stars at the thirteenth annual inani- 
mate target tournament of the Arizona's Sportsmen's 
Association, which was held at Phoenix, Arizona, De- 
cember 28-29-30-31, 1905, were the ones that used 
Winchester products. The high professional average 
for the tournament was made by Mr. W. H. Seaver, 
of San Francisco, Cal , with a Winchester "pump" 
gun and Wnichester "Leader" shells. Mr. Seaver 
scored but 19 lost out of the 345 targets that counted 
on average 94 5-10 per cent, and but 26 lost out of 
the 450 shot at during the entire four days shooting 
94 2-10 per cent, making straight runs of 58, 62 and 
71 respectively, and also five different straight scores 
of 25 during the shoot. At one place during the 
tournament he scored 98 out of 100, and at another 
97 out of 100. Mr. W. J. Rand, of El Paso, Texas, 
an amateur, tied Mr. Seaver on the high average with 
a total of 326 out of his allotted 345, and thus walked 
off with the high amateur average. It was necessary 
for Mr Rand to score 97 out of his last 100 to tie 
Mr. Seaver's scores, and he did it. The gentleman, 
it is needless to state, always shoots a Winchester 
"pump" gun and Winchester "Leader" shells. Mr. W. 
D. Tanner, of Phoenix, Arizona, another shooter that 
always uses the Winchester "pump" gun, captured the 
second high amateur average for the tournament with 
the splendid score of 325 out of his 345, while Mr. 
C. Bulwer, of El Paso, Texas, shooting the time tried 
and reliable Winchester "Leader" shells, capetured the 
third high amateur average with the score of 323. 
The Individual Championship Medal, emblematic of 
the champion wing shot of Arizona, was captured by 
Mr. W. D. Tanner, of Phoenix, after shooting off a 
tie with Mr. K. L. Hart of the same city. Mr. Tanner, 
as stated before, always shoots a Winchester "pump" 
gun. The only straight score of 25 in the Wellington 
Event, which was shot off in a high wind storm, was 
made by Mr. Seaver, shooting a Winchester "pump" 
gun and the "Leader" shells. The McVeagh Handicap 
Medal was captured by Mr. Geo Julian, of Tucson, 
Arizona, after shooting off a tie with Mr. D. D. Mc- 
Donald, of Prescott, Arizona. Both Mr. Julian and 
Mr. McDonald shot Winchester "pump" guns and the 
Winchester "Leader" shells. The Two-Man Cham- 
pionship Trophy was won by Mr. W. B. Purcell, of 
Tucson, Arizona, and Mr. A. A. Jones, of Mesa, Ari- 
zona. Both gentlemen shot Winchester "pump" guns, 
and In connection Mr. Jones used "Leader" shells. 
Mr. Seaver's and Mr. Rand's scores day by day, were: 
First day, Seaver 90 out of 95, Rand 90 out of 95; 
second day, Seaver 88 out of 95, Rand 86 out of 95; 
third day, Seaver 81 out of 85, Rand 82 out of 85; 
fourth day, Seaver 67 out of 70. Rand 68 out of 70; 
grand total. Seaver 325 out of 345, Rand 326 out of 345 



X & N 

On a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soaa lemonade* 
and be refreshed. 



AGE LIMITS OF DAIRY COWS. 

A bulletin from the Wisconsin Sta- 
tion states that a cow is at her best 
during her fifth and sixth years, up to 
which time the production of milk anu 
butter fat by cows In normal condi- 
tion increases each year. The length 
of time the cow will maintain her max- 
imum production depends on her con- 
stitutional strength and the care with 
which she is fed and managed. A good 
dairy cow should not show any marked 
falling off until after ten years of age. 
Many excellent records have been made 
by cows older than this. The quality 
of the milk produced by heifers is 
somewhat better than that of older 
cows, for a decrease has been noted of 
one to two-tenths of one per cent in 
the average fat content for each year 
till the cows have reached the full age. 
This is caused by the increase in the 
weight of the cows with advancing 
age. At any rate, there seems to be 
a parallelism between the two sets of 
figures for the same cows Young ani- 
mals use a portion of their food for 
the formation of body tissue, and it is 
to be expected, therefore, that heifers 
will require a larger proportion of 
nutrients for the production of milk 
or butter fat than do other cows. Af- 
ter a certain age has been reached, 
on the average seven years of age, 
the food required for the production of 
a unit of milk or butter fat again In- 
creases both as regards dry matter and 
the digestible components of the food. 
A good milk cow of exceptional 
strength, kept under favorable condi- 
tions, whose digestive system has not 
been impaired by overfeeding or 
crowding for high results, should con- 
tinue to be a profitable producer till 
her twelfth year, although the economy 



of her production is apt to be some- 
what reduced before this age if 
reached. 



Toghill Stud 



POULTRY MOTES. 

Eggs are more marketable than 
fowls. Fowls need to be sold by the 
dozen or half dozen, amounting to two 
or three dollars. A merchant does not 
like to handle one fowl, but few per- 
sons will not use a dozen fresh eggs 

While oats and wheat may be fed In 
the bundle, it is doubtful If corn should 
be fed in the ear. Hens seem to en- 
joy thrashing their own wheat and 
oats, and it may be good for them, but 
corn is too hard to shell for them to 
have to peck it off. A man can shell it 
a good deal easier. 

Winter eggs are the ones most de- 
sired. A wideawake breed, comfortable 
scratching pens, plenty of food deep 
in the straw in the morning, with a 
warm mash at night, and warm quar- 
ters to roost in, is almost a sure re- 
cipe to obtain them. It is worth try- 
ing. 

Chickens are fond of dandelions and 
will eat them in preference to many 
kinds of grass. It is practicably impos- 
sible to start a grass plot of any kind 
where poultry feed, as they will pick 
off every sprig as soon as it appears. 
Grass plots need to be fenced off to 
themselves in order to get a good start 
before the fowls are allowed on them. 

In raising fowls they should be tame, 
they should have range, should have a 
good place in which to roost, should be 
protected from storms, lice .and thieves. 

White fowls are more easily dressed, 
and present a good appearance, with 
less work, than the dark feathered 
ones, as they are not discolored by pin 
feathers. I 



(Property of Stephen T. Britten) 



SQUIRE 

OF 
CHESTER 




Blue 
Roan 



THE LATEST IMPORTED ENGLISH HACKNEY 

SQUIRE OF CHESTER 

A few engagement* may be booked for hljh-cl&ss, well-bred mares. 

WILLIAM WALKER, Manager, Menlo Park, Cal. 

Crabbet Arabian Stud 



SI SSI!\, ENG I AND. 



CRABBET PARK. THREE BRIDGES, 
and 

NEWBDILDING8, SOD TH WATER. 

The largest breeding stud of Arabian horses In the world. Thecondltlonsunderwhlchtbe.se 
horses are bred at Newbulldlngs produce a tjpe unrivalled for quality and hardiness The unique 
knowledge of the breed gained by the owners In Arabia enables them to guarantee purity of blood of 
the choicest strains, soma of which are now extinct In the East. Stallions and mares constantly 
supplied to breeders throughout the Colonies and on the Continent. A few mares suitable for polo, 
hacks and quiet Id harness generally for sale. For further particulars address 

GUY CABLETON, Man ger, Carpenters, Southwater, Sussex, England. 



12 



[January 0, 190(1 



WRINKLES ON MERINOS. 

(Prof. Thomas Shaw, in American Sheep Breeder.) 



Fashion is one of the most exacting and inconsider- 
ate tyrants of the world. Men are accustomed to say 
that its poweT over women is omnipotent, particularly 
Itl matters pertaining to dress. But it may well be 
questioned as to whether fashion is stronger in its 
hold upOn women in these matters, than it is upon 
men In hard matters of fact that pertain to certain 
lines of business. Among the many and varied in- 
stances which may be chosen to illustrate the potency 
t»f fashion over men, In matters pertaining to business, 
hone is more opposite to the purpose of such illustra- 
tion than that which pertains to the crowding upon 
American Merino sheep as many wrinkles or folds 
In the skin as the body may be able to carry. This 
fashion is to some extent apparently In decadence at 
the present time, but its power is still strong with 
some breeders of Merino sheep. Some thirty or forty 
years ago, its prevalence was almost universal among 
the breeders of th^s class as witnessed by the pic- 
tures of typical Merinos of those days. But even then 
practical American breeders have set up a standard 
of revolt ms witnessed in the types and sub-types of 
Delaines that were then being evolved. The fewer 
wrinkles in the American Merinos of today bear 
testimony to decadence In this fashion, but even now 
Individual animals, laden down with wrinkles, are 
frequently In evidence. 

The story of the influence that led to the develop- 
ment of wrinkles would be interesting could it be 
known. Who is able to tell it? Such peculiarities 
of development have usually a stratum of utility on 
which to rest as an excuse for their existence. The 
large surface covered by wool on the Shropshire was 
encouraged, it is said, for the better protection of 
the sheep from dies. In time breeders lost sight of 
this original intent and soon came to worship at the 
shrine of abundant wool covering, as an evidence 
of very much that was good in the animal. Likewise, 
it Is probable that some wrinkles were tolerated at 
tirst. as an evidence of some quality or qualities, and 
that In time wrinkles drew forth the homage of breed- 
ers as an evidence of the same. 

When did wrinkles lirst appear? Did they charac- 



terize Spanish Merinos in the days of Moorish sway 
in Spain? Were they borne by the Merinos of Taren- 
tum In Sicily? Did they characterize the ancestors 
of the Spanish Merinos In Italy in the days of Pliny? 
Were they inherent In the race or are they the out- 
come of spontaneous variation perpetuated by man 
through selection in breeding? Who can go back 
through the mists of those vanished years and dig 
up some information with reference to these questions 
from out the buried centuries? 

Whatever led to the fostering of the wrinkles on 
American Merinos, are there any good reasons why 
they should be perpetuated? If there has been some 
recession from extreme wrinkly form during recent 
years, how far should such decadence be allowed to 
go? Should it go to the extent of entire obliteration, 
or should some wrinkles be retained, and it so how- 
many? Partial obliteration has taken place in the 
breeding of Rambouillets. the direct descendants of 
the Spanish Merino, and also in the various types of 
Delaines. But if partial removal be a good thing, 
why not entire removal be a good thing? In some 
of the Delaine families wrinkles have been entirely 
removed, why should they not be entirely removed 
in all of these? These are pertinent questions and 
they are reasonable. Will not some of the admirers 
of the wrinkles lift up the curtain and let in a flood 
of light upon this question? It would certainly be 
to their interest as .breeders to do so, as many, like 
the writer, look upon the wrinkles as an unnecessary 
and troublesome appendage. 

I have put the question to individual breeders of 
the American Merino and also to breeders in convoca- 
tion, as to why they encouraged wrinkles, and never 
yet gained but one answer that was satisfactory. That 
answer was. that wrinkles increased the shearing 
surface, and consequently the animal furnished a 
heavier wool clip. This answer will be considered 
presently. Breeders have defended wrinkles on the 
ground that their presence indicated much vigor and 
stamina. Is that true? I will not question the fact 
that many sheep with abundant wrinkles have shown 
marked vigor, but I do not question the inference that 
abundant wrinkles were the cause of such vigor or 
were in any way inherently associated with it. I 
can readily trace the relation between a strong heart 
girth and abundant vigor, but I cannot trace any re- 



lation between amplitude of skin to the extent of pro- 
ducing many folds and wrinkles and abundant vigor 
If any can reason out clearly such a relation I. at 
least, will be grateful for the information. 

What is (bt value of the argument that folds an) 
wrinkles increase the weight of fleece? '1 ney do in- 
crease it, but is the increase worth the cost? In- 
crease in wrinkles is attended first with less of uni- 
formity in the fibres of the wool, second with in- 
creased difficulty in shearing, and third with decrease 
in mutton value. Every one who has judged Merinos 
has noticed the character of the wool fiber on the 
crest of the wrinkles as compared with the wool in 
the depressions between the wrinkles. Uniformity in 
wool fibres is one of the most valuable characteristics 
nt a fleece. No one will deny tVe greatly increased 
difficulty of shearing as the wrinkles increase. This 
increased cost of shearing is considerable in a large 
(lock. That wrinkles lessen the value of the carcass 
for mutton is apparent in the fact that skin cannot 
be eaten as food. The writer also has some doubt 
as to the completely healthy action of the skin away 
down in those buried recesses between the crests of 
the wrinkles. 

The breeders of Rambouillets and Delaines evident- 
ly had objections to the presence of very abundant 
wrinkles, hence the partial elimination of the same, 
and in some instances total elimination. Why did they 
Stop short of total elimination? Breeders of Ram- 
bouillets and Delaines, can you answer why? If 
partial removal is a good thing, why not total elimina- 
tion be good? On the other hand, if the retention of 
a few folds and wrinkles is a good thing, why should 
not the retention of more folds and wrinkles be a 
better thing? 

()f course the emilination of wrinkles, though it 
should be desired, is not the work of a day. The habit 
of producing wrinkles in Merinos is noubtless cen- 
turies old. Therefore, like all the questionable habits 
of long continuance, it does not die readily. Genera- 
tions of breeding will be required to procure the end 
sought, since, though elemination in selection in 
breeding should be ever so careful, and persistent 
atavic transmission will occasionally produce wrin- 
kles for generations. Notwithstanding, in time they 
may be as completely removed from Merino sheep, as 
scurs have been from Galloway cattle 



MORE LIVE STOCK THAN EVER. 

The following is a brief synopsis of 
the principal features of the year's live 
stock business as told in the Live Stock 
World of Chicago: 

Cattle market was the highest in 
April. 

Combined receipts of all kinds of live 
stock broke all previous records. 

Receipts of Western range cattle for 
the year were 90 000 head, which was 
the second largest in the history of the 
business. 

I >utside of show cattle at the Inter- 
national, the highest price paid for 
beef cattle during the year was $7. 

Cattle prices were higher than last 
year, though the general quality was 
considered worse. 

There was a remarkably good ship- 
ping demand all the year for all kinds 
of live stock and the proportion of 
cattle, hogs and sheep that was sent 
out was larger than usual. 

Demand for cows throughout the 
year was unusually good and the mar- 
kets were more uniform and satisfac- 
tory. 

The high price of hides was a strong 
factor in boosting up the market for 
the common cows. 

High price of corn made cattle feed- 
ers timid. 

Receipts of calves were smashed for 
the day, the week, the month and the 
year. 

The supply of calves for the year 
total close to 380 000, which Is more 
than 100,000 in excess of last year. 

The high price of milk and butter 
was responsible for many calves being 
marketed. 

A peculiar feature of the trend of 
the cattle prices for the year was that 
they were highest in the spring, while 
in the previous year they were at the 
lowest point at that time of the year. 

Quality of the Western range cattle 
was better than «in 1904 and prices 
made a higher average. 

More range hay fed cattle were re- 
ceived this year than in any previous 
year. 

The top for range cattle during the 
year was $5.15. 

Calves reached $8.50 twice during the 

year. 

There were more feeding sheep ship- 
ped out this year than in any previous 

year. 

The hog average for the year will 
be close to 223 lbs, which was a little 
heavier than last year, but lighter than 

in 1903. 

Close to 318,000 cattle were forward- 
ed during the year for export. It was 
the second largest number on record. 

The outlet for beef product was good 
all the year. 

All kinds of records were broken in 



the horse department. 

Receipts of sheep were the largest 
on record by a large majority, yet 
prices during the year averaged from 
$1@2 higher than in 1904. 

It was a great year for the man with 
the sheep. 

About 75 per cent of the ovine stock 
shipped out for breeding purposes this 
year consisted of lambs. 

An unprecedented number of ewes 
were shipped out for breeding purposes 
this year. 

The year's receipts of horses at Chi- 
cago will total close to 127 000 head, 
which shows that the automobiles have 
not yet put the horse raisers out of 
business. 

There were 18,448 horses received in 
March, which smashed the previous 
record. 

The largest receipts of cattle in one 
day during the year was December 11. 
when arrivals^ were 35,153. 

Not as many feeding cattle were sent 
out this year as last. 

Prices of sheep at this end of the line 
were too high to admit of much busi- 
ness being done in the export line dur- 
ing the year. 

All kinds of live stock show a higher 
average than last year. 

Hog prices were about 25 cents high- 
er than last year. 

Combined receipts of live stock at 
Chicago for the year were close to 16,- 
337.000 head and there were 5.000,000 
head shipped out. 

Inasmuch as all kinds of live stock 
show higher average prices for the year 
and there has been so much increase 
in total volume of receipts, the year's 
valuation will show an increase of 
around $20,000,000 compared with 1904. 

. o — i 

TWIN BORN LAMBS. 



The twin lambs in an ordinary flock 
are usually smaller than single lambs. 
Whether the smaller size is due pri- 
marily to the lack of proper nutrition 
after birth or to the small size at birth 
or to both these conditions has not 
been clearly determined. 

The difference between the birth 
weights of twin lambs and single 
lambs is smaller than is usually sup- 
posed. The birth weight of the twin 
male lambs is greater than the birth 
weight of the single female lambs. The 
average birth rate of all twin born 
lambs is about one-half pound below 
the general average for all lambs. The 
single female lambs weighed at birth 
only eight-tenths of a pound more than 
the twin-born females. 

The smaller size of twin lambs ob- 
served in most flocks is undoubtedly 
more the result of insufficient nutri- 
tion while suckling than the inferior 
size at birth. Very few ewes yield 



sufficient milk to properly nourish two 
thrifty, early maturing lambs. If such 
lambs are early taught to eat grain and 
hay the twin lambs will in most cases 
thrive equally as well as the single 
lambs of the same birth weight. 

With a little attention lambs may be 
taught to eat at a very early age, and 
grain fed at this time while the lamb 
is suckling will produce larger gains 
than at any later time. If the twin 
lambs begin early to supplement the 
milk of the mother by eating corn. oats, 
clover hay and possibly a little oil 
meal, they will thrive and in the end 
become as thrifty as single lambs. A 
flock of ewes that has been bred for 
the production of twins may thus be- 
come considerably more profitable than 
a flock producing single lambs only, 
on the other hand, if the breeder fails 
to supply the extra feed and care nec- 
essary for the twin lambs, it may be, 
as often stated, that one good single 
lamb is better than two puny ones. — 
F. B. Mumford. 

TREATMENT OF DISEASES. 

The treatment of poultry diseases 
seldom should concern the farmer. It 
the healthiest and most vigorous breed- 
ing fowls are kept, the chickens reared 
under satisfactory conditions, fed on 
wholesome food and not over crowded, 
and the building kept thoroughly clean 
and disinfected, there rarely will be 
disease among them. When disease 
does appear, it usually will be found 
more satisfactory to kill and bury the 
sick birds than to treat the disease. 

The poultry houses should be thor- 
oughly cleaned out and disinfected by 
the use of a spray pump. A good spray 
mixture may be made from a 2 per 
cent solution of chloride of lime or 
creolin or carbolic acid. Spray every 
square inch of everything inside, roof, 
walls, roosts, nests, etc. Close up and 
allow the fumes to act a few hours, 
then open and ventilate. 

The poultry yard if situated so that 
it cannot be plowed and cropped, 
should be treated with unslaked lime 
dust. Scrape the yards clean of man- 
ure and refuse, scatter the lime thick 
on the ground, then sprinkle the lime 
with water from the spray pump. This 
will slake the lime and cause it to 
destroy any germs of parasites in the 
soil. 

Leghorns reach maturity by the con- 
sumption of as little food as any breed 
that produces marketable eggs. But 
w hile they are hustlers they are easily 
affected by draught, and need warm 
houses, in order to do well. This can 
be said of any breed Warm quarters 
do not necessarily mean expensive 
ones. Cheap material may be used. 



WHY NOT RAISE POULTRY? 

The greatest opportunity exists for 
special development of the poultry and 
dairy industries in California, says a 
recent bulletin of the California Promo, 
tion Committee. It is urged upon the 
farming people of the State to look into 
these industries for profit to be ob- 
tained therefrom. California is spend- 
ing millions of dollars every -year for 
poultry and eggs and ftnsfertr States 
are reaping the benefit of the l«xity 
of California's citizens. In the past 
twelve months more than $3,000.00(1 
were sent East for eggs alone, while 
the money expended in the Middle 
West for chic kens and turkeys to sup- 
ply the California market probably ex- 
ceeded that spent for eggs. California 
is especially adapted for poultry rais- 
ing In all parts of the State, and as an 
adjunct to the Income from farms of 
all kinds, and especially fruit farms, 
there is nothing that brings in more 
ready money than chickens. It takes 
little capital to start when the farm is 
already going and the profits are cer- 
tain and constant. Hundreds of peo- 
ple who are now living on small farms 
of ten acres or less could make a good 
living if they would turn their atten- 
tion to the raising of poultry. 



Warranted to Give Satl.tfacUon. 



Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs , and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheric. Removes all 
Benches from Horse or Cattle. 
As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc, It Is Invaluable. 

Tverv bottle of Caustie Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to prive satisfaction. Price $1 SO 
per bottle. Sold hr druggists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for 
its use. I^TSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

•The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



January 6, 19. 6] 



<£it£ gveebcv axxb gtv&vt&xxxaxx 



To PREVENT TOE DRAGGING. 

Alexander Corcoran discusses in the 
Horseshoers' Journal a serious defect 
in many horses and explains the reme- 
dies: 

How frequently we find a horse com- 
ing into our shop with the toe of his 
hind foot worn completely off or 
square. Sometimes both feet are af- 
fected, and I have seen one hind and 
one fore foot come in. in the same way. 
We must do something with it. or else 
the foot is ruined. What is to be done? 
Our first impulse is to place a thick, 
heavy clip on the toe. filling out the 
worn off parts with steel or iron, and 
thus giving the foot double wear on 
these parts affected. All's good, but 
watch the ending. In two weeks, per- 
haps less, we will find the horse back 
again with the foot in exactly the same 
condition as before, and he is shod over 
again in the same way, to again wear 
off the toe calk, clip and all. Look 
over the shoe as it comes off; see the 
heel calks, how high they are; scarcely 
worn a particle; it's the toe that's 
gone, and bad, too Whafs the cause'.' 
Many. 

Place a perfect legged horse in the 
hands of a lady to drive, and unless 
she is an expert, that horse gets lazy, 
and the cure in this case is a good 
driver with a good whip. Again, we 
find horses driven along at a good rate, 
that may be affected with the same 
trouble? What's the cause in this case? 
In travel, watch such a horse and see 
if there is not a stiff action of the 
muscles above the hock joint ai »' be- 
low the hip. Veterinary sui'geons 
know the location by its proper name; 
we know the muscles are stiff and do 
not. perform their natural work. So 
the horse finds a tremendous task be- 
fore him in making up for the loss of 
their power, and with the weight on 
the extreme end of the limb additional 
labor devolves on him. The result is, 
that he has not sufficient power to do 
his work in a clear way. and he will 
drag his toe in doing it. 

Remedy; First, see a veterinary 
surveon and have the limb examined, 
and let him prescribe; but should he 
insist on the horse being perfect, just 
apply a slight blister to the affected 
parts described above. Use a little 
blister, too, on the lower tendons, and 
in a few days, or when the horse is 
strong, do your shoeing. 

First — Have the shoe light 

Second— Have the toe calk well set 
back on the web, and the shoe very 
full to the toe. 

Third — Have the shoe fitted only the 
length of the foot. 

Fourth — And a little lower on the 
heels. 

Fifth — In a plain shoe, have the heels 
some thinner, and the roll begin one- 
half inch from the toe. 

Sixth — Don't weight the toe with a 
heavy clip; it's an invitation for the 
horse to begin dragging again. 

Seventh — Keep the heels of the foot 
low in dressing, and nurse a long toe. 

Follow these directions, and in nine 
out of ten cases a cure will be worked 
for the toe dragging horse. 

TUBERCULOSIS IN CATTLE. 



Dr. Frederick A. Spafford of the Da- 
kota Board of Regents, a distinguished 
physician, believes that the State could 
stamp out tuberculosis in cattle in a 
few years. 

He would have every patient, as soon 
as symptoms of the disease were dis- 
covered, removed to a camp where it 
would not come in contact with the 
healthy community, and there, with 
proper treatment, particularly from the 
hygienic standpoint, he thinks a sur- 
prisingly large number would be re- 
stored to health. 

He says that the popular impression 
that tuberculosis is necessarily fatal 
is entirely mistaken and that there are 
thousands of recoveries every year. 
The trouble being entirely a germ dis- 
ease, the recovery from it depends upon 
the ability of the white corpuscles of 
the blood to surround, fight back, eat 
up and destroy the tubercular bacilli. 
If the general condition of the patient 
is good and his hygienic surroundings 
what they should be, the chances for 
recovery are very large. 

o 

There was a time when farmers were 
looking for thin animals for feeding 
purposes. They seemed to think the 
gap between the "skin and bones" 
stage and a finished condition must be 
bridged by the feeder if any profit 
weYe to be made, says the Detroit 
News-Tribune. All of this has been 
changed, however, and now the ex- 



perienced feeder no longer looks for 
thin feeding stock, but prefers that 
which has been well conditioned in 
advance of the time when a full grain 
ration is to be fed. That more grain is 
required to make the first hundred 
pounds of gain on a bullock than the 
last has been repeatedly demonstrated, 
and experienced feeders prefr to buy 
steers that are in fair killing condi- 
tion. There are now many cattle 
feeders in Michigan who make it a 
rule to fill their feed yards in 
February or March with cattle that 
have been well started by others. 

The type of the cow has just as much 
to do with milk giving capacity in 
proportion to feed consumed as the 
form of the horse does In making* of 
him a wasteful or an economical feed- 
der. We have all seen slab-sided, 
leggy horses that required a barn full 
of hay and 50 ears of corn a day to 
fill up. There is the same difference in 
cows. It pays the farmer to be able 
to judge of the value of cows by the 
animal's form — dairy form. 

o 

Sponges— S. Adderley, 307 Market St. 



Inquire of H. R, RAND, Fashion Sta- 
bles, Ellis Street, 

BAY GKLDINO, Five years old. stands 17 
hands, weighs 12<)0. By St. Whips. 1st dam by 
Daly, 2d dam by Milton Medium. Thoroughly 
broken single or double. A great actor, a grand 
road horse and warranted SOUND. 

CHESTNUT GKLDINO, 8 years old, 16 hands 
high, weighs 1200 lbs. A grand surry or trap horse. 
Has been driven by a lady in the Park all winter. 
Without a doubt, this is the best family horse in 
the country. Guaranteed Sound. 

One New Side Bar stivers (of N Y.l Buggy 

Pneumatic tires, Carmine gear, black body. 

One Side Spring, High Hack, Business or Run- 
About Buggy. 

One New Chicago Road or Breaking Cart. Long 
shafts. Best one in the city. 

One Set New Coach Harness. 

One Set New Surry Harness 

Ten Set New Single Harness. 

Two Sets of Run about Harness. 

Also Light Road and Track Harness. Some 
Fancy Halters, Pads, Etc. 



Veterinary Experience 



Infallible guide to horse health. 
100 page book, free. Symptoms 
of all diseases and treatment, 
by eminent veterinary, com- 
pounder of 

TUTTLE'S 




ELIXIR. 



Sure cure for curb, colic, splint, recent shoe boils, 
most horse ailments. $100. reward for failure where 
we say it will cure. 

Tuttle's American Worm Powders never fail. 
Tuttle's Family Elixir, greatest of all household 
liniments. Write for th" book. 
TUTTLE'S ELIXIR CO., 52 Beverly St., Boston. Mass. 

Mack & Co., San Francisco and F. W, Braun, Log 
Angeles, California Agents. 



TO TRADE. 

\ FIVE-YEAR-OLD COLT, 14.8 hands high; 
J * weighs 900 pounds; bright sorrel in color; 
perfectly sound and can run a quarter of a mile 
in 23 seconds or better. Suitable for a polo pony. 
Will trade for a draft stallion. Will sell at a 
reasonable price. Address 

SOL SHOCKLEY, Merced, Cal. 



A 



SURREY HORSE WANTED. 

HIGH-CLASS HORSE SUITABLE FOR 
surrey Must be over 16 hands high, stylish, 
thoroughly broken for city driving, have good 
action and a good disposition. Give particulars 
where horse can be seen, price, etc. Address 
J. VV , care of Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary 
Street, San Francisco. 



FOR SALE-MUST BE SOLD, 

Bay Filly, foaled May 9, 1904, by Alta Vela 2:1 1 

and out of Grace Lowry by Diablo 2-.0SH- 
Chestnut Colt foaled 1902, by Nutwood Wilkes 

2:16!4 and out of Lily Langtry.dam of Dudley 

2:14. of Ed. B Young 2:U%, of Lily Direct 

2:2114 and of Estelle 2:24M 
Bay Colt, foaled May 31, 1904, by Bonnie Direct 

2:05M and out of Allx B. 2:24% by Nutwood 

Wi kes 2:l6i/ 2 . 
Bay Filly (thoroughbred), Reg. No 32793. foaled 

May. 1902, by Abalanzar and out of Flam- 

beauette by Flambeau. 
Address all ooramunioations to CARLTON W. 
GREENE Sixth Floor, Uaion Trust Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SHOE BOILS to cure, yet 




Absorbine 



Will remove them and 
leave no blemish. Does 
not blister or remove the 
hair. Cures any puff or 
swelling. $2.00 per bottle, 
delivered. Book 7-B Free. 
ABSORBINE, JR., for 
Mankind, $1.00 per Bottle. Cures Boils, Bruises, 
Old Sores. Swellings, Etc. Mfd. only by 

W F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

54 Monmouth Street. Springfield, Mall. 

Forsaleby Mack&Co Langley &MlchaelsCo. 
aldington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. MoKerron 
all of San Franolsoo 



FOR EXCHANGE 

ONE < OOD LOOKING 80DND YOUNU 
ROAD HORSK, good actor, thoroughly city 
broken— and ONE CHESTNUT GKLOING 

sound and a good roader; both guaranteed every 
way. I want to trade the above horses for a well 
matched thoroughly broken team something that 
will do to use for park driving. 

Address, H. R. RAND, 

Fashion Stables, San Francisco. 



JACK FOR SALE. 



A 



BLACK JACK WITH LIGHT POINTS; 
large, heavy boned, prompt and a good han- 
dler. Is a good foal gett»r and his foals are 
excellent Individuals. Price very reasonable for 
prompt sale. Address for further particulars, 
8. B. WRIGHT, Santa Rosa. 



FOR SALE OR LEASE. 

Two Prince Airlie Stallions. 

PORTO I. A 37413, a handsome golden bay. 7 
years old, 16 hands, weighs 1190 lbs. 

MENLO BOY 37401, a magnificent brown with 
white points, 6yearsold, 16.1 hands, weighs 
1200 lbs. 

These t<vo horses are full brothers, being sired 
by Prince Airlie 28045: he by Guy Wilkes 2:15)*, 
sire of Fred Khol 2:0'7%, Hulda2:08!4, Seymour 
Wilkes 2:08^: first dam Signal by Del Sur 2:24: 
second dam Lady Signal 2:35(4 by Signal 3327. 
Both of these horses are very fast for the amount 
of worx , being only a few months last year, show- 
ing quarters around :34 and 35. 

For further information apply to 

P. H. McEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal. 



The Perfectly Gaitcd Trotting Stallion 

ALTA VELA 2:11 1-4 

(Reg. No. 22449) 

Sirs). ELECTIONEER, sire of 166 in 2:30 and 
grandsire of Major Delmar 1:59%. 

Dam LOhlTA 2:18(4 (dam of Alta Vela 2:ll(, 
and Palorl 2:24(^1 by Piedmont 2: 17«; second 
c"am, Lady Lowell (dam of Ladywell 2:16(4 
and Lorita 2:18(4) by St. Clair; third dam, 
Laura, dam of Doo, sire of Occident 2:16% 
Address all communications to BREEDER 

AND SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary St., San Franclsoo. 



Registered Siiire stallion 

FOR SALE. 

TET BLACK STALLION; WEIGHT 1750; 
" seven years old. Is a blocky built, big boned 
horse and a sure foal getter, and his colts will be 
shown. Price reasonable. For further particu- 
1 ars apply to oMce of Breeder and Sportsman. 



The Standard Bred Stallion 

ODANROC 

FOR SALE. 

( )DANROC 13 A COAL BLACK STALLION; 
w was four years old last September; Is hand- 
some He is stylish aDd sounu as a new dollar, 
and with less than four months' work has shown 
a trial mile in 2:28 and quarters at a 2:2(1 clip. 
Odanroc Is by Coronado 2:12'/ s . he by McKlnney 
2:11 H Odanroo'sdam is the standard and regis- 
tered black mare Bessie Rex 2:26(4, sired by Atto 
Rex 2:21, he by Attorney, he by Harold Bessie 
Rex's flr.st dam is the black mare Klatta, stand- 
ard and registered. Odanroc Is in every respect 
a fine individual. Stands 153(4 hands, weighs 
11501bs. and is a square and level headed trotter. 
Wears no boots, is as kind as a kitten, fears 
nothing, and any chi d can drivehim with safety. 
For price and further particulars address 

G. W DEFORD, 
P. O. Box 305, National City, Cal. 



Fine Pasturage. 

No Wire Fencing. Good Box Stalls 
and Best of Care 

given horses in any manner that owners may 
desire, al reasonable rates. For further particu- 
lars address 

MRS. M L CHASE, Sonoma, Cal. 



McKINNEY STALLION FOR SALE. 

ANE OF THE GRANDEST LOOKING AND 
" best bred McKinney stallions ever foaleo is 
offered for sale He is Ave years old, sired by the 
great McKinney 2:Il(i, dam by Dexter Prince, 
that sired the dam of Nora MoKinney 2:I2M (trial 
to wagon 2:09); second dam by a son of Election- 
eer; third dam by McDonald Chief, sire of the 
dams of Tom Smith 2:i3({ ana Stella 2:15(4 
ThlsstalHon has nevtr raced and has Dot been 
trained, but has trotted m'les better than 2:30 
and quarters in 35 seconds Stands 15 3 weighs 
1050pounds, is a beautiful bay with black points 
and without a pimple. Is an exceptionally band- 
some horse flue disposition and has marvelous 
endurance. No horse living has cleaner, 
straighteror more perfect legs A grand pros- 
pect to train and a sure money-maker in the 
stud Would make one of the grandest roadsters 
In Amerioa. For further pa ticulars address 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St., San Francisco 



672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1BBELL & SON, 1'roprletora. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Boarding, Training and Handling all kinds 
Fancy Horses. A few Nice Rigs on hand Ti' 
any car going to the Chutes. Tel.: West 259 



TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISADERO AND FULTON 8TS. 
(1408 Fulton Street) 

Horses Called For, Clipped and Delivered 

AT POPULAR PRICES. 

BUSINESS HORSES FOR I.'IUK 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Stable near the above oorner, and will board and 
train for racing road use or matinee driving, a 
limited number of first-class horses at reasonable 
rates Have good location, brand-new stable and 
everything first-class All horses in my care will 
receive the best of attention. 

Phone: Park 573. T. C BN E V. 



THE HORSES of the celebrated ROSE DALE 
STOCK FARM, belonging to the Late Dr. William 
J? inlaw of Santa Rosa, are being sold at private sale 
by the administratrix of bis estate. These comprise 
the well-known stallions, WASHINGTON McKIN- 
NEY and ST. WHIPS, and two three-year-old Stal- 
lions, Colts, Yearlings and Brood Marcs, mostly of 
the McKinney and St. Whips stock. 

Address ANNA L. FINLAW, Santa Rosa, Cal. 




Take ir In Time 

( If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
aot promptly, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, Wlndpuffs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Quinn's Ointment 

It has saved thousands of good horses from the peddler's 
cart and the broken-down horse market. Mr. C. It. Dick- 
I ens, of Minneapolis, Minn., who conducts one of the largest livery stables In the Northwest, 
I writes is follows: I have been using Qulnn'a Ointment for some tlmo and with the greatest 
success I take pleasure In recommending It to my friends. No horseman should be with- 
outltliihls stable. For curbs, splints, spavins, wlndpuffsand all bunches It has DO rqua I 
Prlae 00 per battle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mull. Write us for circulars, 

rr^f«tW t fn» 8ent IV- B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 




Pedigrees Tabulated 



and typewritten ready for frtmin 
Write for prices. Breeder and 
SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



14 



I JANUARY 6, J9l<i 




THE BAYWOOD STUDl 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALY, Manager. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 y.o. Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 y.o. Stallion of 1905 

Two-year-old Kecoid — 8:15 
Three-year-nlrt Record . . .2 : 1 2 If 
Trial In a Race 2:10'/, 



WINNER OK HARTFORD FUTURITY (»850O) FUlt 1905. 



BOM VOYAOK (3) feWf Is by Expedition 8:15* by Electioneer 126: dan Bin Mot by BriBKMV; 
second dam Farce 2:29* by Prlneeps 538: third dam Roma by Golddust 150 For breeding, Individu- 
ality and racing qualities be Is unsurpassed 



Season of 1900 at AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, 

where he will serve a limited number of mares. 

tCO fnr iU* CoQcnn USUAL RETURM PRIVILEGES, or money refunded should mare 
$0\J IUr UlC oCaSUll. not prove In foal A rare chance tb breed good mares to an excep- 
tionally higti-olass and highly brei young stallion. For further information address 

J. o. GERRirl, 4607 Agrlca tural Ave., Loh Angelea, Cal. 



Tlio McKinnoy Stallion 



KENNETH C. 2:17 



, THREE > 
I YEAR ( 

1 OLD 

( RECORD J 




Sired by McKINNEY: dam MOUNTAIN 

MAID (dam of Tom Carneal 2:08!4) by 
Cresco 4908 (sire of Allle Oresco 2:13, etc ); 
next dam by Cloud. 

Will make the Season of 1906 at 

PLEASANT0N, CAL. 

KENNETH C. was one of the fastest of an 
exceptionally good lo' of three-year-olds that 
raced In California in 1905. He is a splendid 
individual, has size, style acd quality, and 
the grands* ns and granddaughters of McKin- 
ney through Kenneth C. will be equal to any 
in the land. 



Terms 



I S3" for the Season, 
i SIS for Single Service. 



Address 



S. K TREFRY, Pleasftn on. 



WAYLAND W. 22516. Record 2:12|. 

ONE OF THE LEADING SIRES OF 2:10 PERFORMERS OF 1905. 

Sire of Holivar 2:06'/i. leading money earning pacer of season 1905. Sire of 
Monism 8.12, highest class trotter on California circuit in 1904. Wayland W. is 
by Arthur Wilkes L'li'S. dam Lettio (dam of Wavland W. 2:12%. Welcome 2:10%. 
Maud Sinjdeton L':2M by Wayland Forrest. Although Wayland W. has never been 
mated with mares by Electioneer, Director. Nutwood. Sultan, Stamboul, Anteeo or 
any of our great sires, he is the sire of liolivar 2:0614, Nellie R. 2:10, Arthur W. 
2:11%, Morosco 2:12. John A. 2.12%,, Forrest W. 2:14'i. Iceland W. 2:16, Al Sandy 
2:19U, Maud Sears 2:21, Honita Wilkes 2:26*4. Wayland W. will make the 
Season of 1906 at SANTA ROSA, at McGregor & Hockins' Stables. 

W. C. HELMAN. Owner. 

Terms $40 for the Season. Pasture $3.00 per month. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



3 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
Into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an aore has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR — the PALM ROOM, furnished In Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location In the City— all add much to the ever Increasing popularity 

of this most famous HOTEL. 



1IIONE PARK 162 



A. J. MARTIN, rop. 



BOARDING AND LIVERY 



15QO FEIiL 

ItKST OF ACCOMMODATIONS. 
CALL AND SEE FOR YOURSELF. 



STREET 

BET. LYON AND CENTRAL AVE. 
Hayes St Cars Pass the Door 



THOMPSON'S SALE AND TRAINING STABLES 

PLEA.SANTON RACE TRACK 

One of the Best Equipped Training Stables in California. 

Owners desiring to have horses handlel and put in condition for sale or. racing are invited to 
correspond with the undersigned. 

J AS. THOMPSON. Pleasanton, Cal. 



STALLION OWNER! 

If You Nfkd a Stallion Card or Stock Catalogue Compiled and Printed, Stallion Poster, 
Stallion service Book, a Cut of Your Horse, a Horse Book of any kind or a Tabulated 
Pedigree, Get It where you can get the OHKAPEST and BEST. 

FOR SAMPLES AXl) PRICES ADDRESS 

MAGNUS FLAWS £> CO., 358 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. ILL. 



Mc Kinney, 2.11% 

World's Leading Sire of Extreme Race Horse Speed. 

FEE, $500.00 

€][Fees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No return privilege, 
but fee returned if mare fails to produce a foal. Keep, $2. per week. Our 
terms are rigidly adhered to in all cases, and we cannot deviate from them. 

McKinney is now located at the farm, 1 miles from Cuba. 



Mention this journal 
when writing. 



©lie Empire GIttit iFarma, 



CUBA, 
NEW YORK. 



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AND 



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,,..*... ................................. •»....,.. 



California Trotting Bred 

HORSES 

Giving* Performances of the Get 
of Sires and Dams, etc. 



Thoroughbred Pedigrees 

Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates 



BREEDER & SPORTSMAN 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



CAMPBELL'S 



EM0LLI0 
IODOFORM 



GALL CURE 




For GALL BACK^aad SHOULDERS. CRUPPER 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS ihere Is none 
superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRE CUTS CALKS SCRATCH- 
ES. BLOOD POISON EDSORES and ABRASIONS 
OK THE SKIN It ha- no equal. 

It la very adhesive and easily applied toa watery 
an well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON- 
ING In this respect there is no Gall Cure odered 
which can justly eten claim to be a competitor. 
We placed It on the market relying wholly on Its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding tbe (act that 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising, the sales of 1900 were 100 per cent great- 
er than tbe aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This Increase was entirely due to It* 
MERITS, and from it we feel justified in saving that 
It Is THE GALL CURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY. 

It Is a quick and sure cure for those troublesome 
skin cracks under tbe fetlock which Injure and often 
lay up racehorses. 

All Trainers Should Have It la Tbelr Stables. 



PKICE:-3 OZ. BOX. 25o ; 1 LU. BOX. SI.OO. 
Read our "ad" on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs., 412 W.Madison St., Chicago, 111 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not In stock ask them to write any Jobber for It. 



msraiPER b 6 Master of lese Diseases. 

GRIPPE 
EPIZOOTIC 
COUGHS, E'c. 

WELLS MEDICINE CO. , Chemists & Germologists, 1 3 Third St., Lafayette, Ind 

U E NEWELL, General Agent for Pacific Coast 519 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 



Not a case of these ailments In horses, sheep or 
dogs that any one cannot promptly cure with 
DR CRAFT'S DISTEMPER & COUGH CURE. 
If your druggist oan't supply It. order direct— 50c 
and 11— money back If It falls. Send a postal 
todav for our valuable booklet, "Veterinary 
Pointers " It is free. 




January 6, 19(0] 



15 



SHOOT YOUR GAME 



BALLISTITE 

If you Use It Once, 
You will Use It Again— 
That's what you want! 

Good Shooters Shoot Good Powder. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANG-LES SACRAMENTO 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 



WARRANTED SUPERIOR TO ANT OTHER 
MAKE COSTING S25 MORE. 



We Make 16 Qrades, $17 75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Coast Branch. PHIL B, BEKEART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 



Or 

to 



SMITH HAMMERLESS » EJECTOR GUNS 



ALSO 



HUNTER 

ONE-TRIGGER 




win 

Gold Medal 



at the 



LEWIS & CLARK 
EXPOSITION 




SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



HUNTER APMS CO., FULTON, NEW YORK 



THE GUN OF 
QUALITY 



Parker 



STANDS FOR 



Quality 

135,000 IN USE, 




Quality is of paramount Importance. THE 
recognized standard of the world and gtan 
ever. Tli*» beat gun valae In the world; DO 
It cannot he equaled We never have ma 
and the l» % UK Kit I* always found cheapest In the end. The GUN for Vol: This Is a 
good time to begin to get ready for next season. Let as assist yon. Write today. 



N. Y. Salesrooms: 32 Warren St. 30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 

SHREVE & BARBER CO. 

PIONEER DEALERS 

Market St, igilP^fp^ Kearny St. 

Send tor dB&^ Mailorders 

Catalogue 1^^^ a Specialty 

GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 

SAN FRANCISCO, • • • CALIFORNIA. 



]NTe"W I_iislat 

..MILLER TRAINING CART.. 





Low Seat, Light, Strong & Handsome 

Carries a 275-lb Man. 

"Strong enough to jog to on the road " 

'• r/"l ts the b g horses as well as the colts." 

"Easier to ride in than a sullty." 

The MILi-EK SULKY beats them all for 
lightness, strength and speed. See it before 
ordering any other. 

FOR SALE BY 

JOHN I. SPARROW, Agent 

3 1 5(r Mission St., San Francisco 

Write for Booklet. 



Tweily-Tliird Annual Trials 



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TO HE RUN AT 

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(KERN COUNTY) 

Commencing Monday, Jan. 8, 1906 

Judge. W. J. B lIIUHN, Rldgevllle, Ind. 

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All-Age Stake 

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ChamDion Stake 

Entries for AH- Age Stake close Dec. 15, 191' 5 

W. W. VAN ARSDALE (San Francisco) 
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Telephone Main iw 

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X>x-„ TlsXTxxx, JF\ Elgan. 

M. R. O. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg 
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Pacific Coast Depot; 86-88 FIRST STREET, San Francisco, Cal. E- E. DRAKE, Manager 



J 



Wwchester 

^IVLlVETTINriTIOTVr, RIFLES, SHOTGUNS 

WERE AWARDED 1 HE 

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BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



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J^^^x. SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1906. ,hb« 8U SSSSTt M . 




A TYPICAL MORGAN STALLION 

Chestnut Horse, 15 Hands, Weight 1000 Pounds. Owned in Pennsylvania. 



2 



[January 13, 19€t> 



$10 Payments Due February 1,1906 

ON YEARLINGS IN 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5— $ 7000 Guaranteed 

Nothing More to Pay Before 1907. 

For Foals of Mares covarel in 1904. To trot or pic3 at two and three years old. Entries closed October 15, 1904. Nothing 
More to Pay Before 1907, when your Foal can start in the Two Year-Old Division. Stakes divided as follows: $3250 for 
Trotting; Foals, $1750 fo- Pacing Foals, $800 to Nominators of Dams of Winners and $200 for Owners of Stallions. 

A Chance for Those Who Failed to Enter. 

Substitutions. A few of the original nominators of Pacific Bn eders Futurity Stakes for Foals of 1905 have advised 
us that, beciuse of barrenness of the mare or death of the foal, they wish to dispose of their entries. 
If you own one or more whose dams you neglected tc name when entries closed, send $22, with Color, Sex and Breeding of 
the Foal, on or before February 1st next, which covers payments to February 1, 1907, and the few substitutions to be dis- 
posed of will be awarded in the order in which remittances are received. Prompt attention will secure for you this rich 
engagement. 



E. P. HEALD, President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Sec'y. 36 Geary St., S. F. 



^ Wk^M Trady Mark % 

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Deposit Your 
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and Trainers 

"Save-the-Horse" has proven absolutely 
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strained, injured and broken down tendons, 
it is marvelously effective. 



WITH THE 



"LIFE 8HAFKR," the widely Known trainer of Zephyr 8:11, Heausant 2:12 and 

T«;rraoe Queen 2:06, says : 

Terrace Farm, Titusville, Pa. 

Troy Chemical Co.: 

I used "Sive.the-Horse" all the past season. First on a bad splint close up to 
knee, horse very lima after fast work; could see decided improvement after a few 
day.-' no; in a week's time, lamaness all disappeared. Used with equal success on 
a bowed tendon ; at present am treating a horse that bowed a tendon 3 years ago — 
was a bai case, was fired and blistered, but still went lame; have used a bottle and 
am still using "Save-the-Horse ;" the enlargement has gone down almost one-half, 
horse going sound, and I firmly believe will race again. A friend of mine had a 
horse that bowed a tendon last spring ; by the use of your great remedy, kept him 
racing all fall, gave him a record better than 2 65. Tendon is straight and sound 
as it ever was. Think it the great remedy, kept him racing all fall gave him a 
record better thad 2:05. Tendon is straight and sound as it ever was. Tnink it 
the greatest remedy on earth for a bad leg of anr description. 

Respectfully yours, 

Box 209. L. D. SHAFER, Farm's Trainer. 



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sent express prepaid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, BINGHAMPTON, NEW YORK, SSSS&. 

D. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 



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of California 

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McMURRAY 




McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 
«S-Address for printed matter and prices 

W. J. Kenney 

531 Valencia St., San FrancUco, Cal. 



VICTOR VERILHAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. McGRATH 

Manager 



DEXTER PRINJE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND. SALE 

Cwr. of drove and Baker Streets, Jmt at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 
(Take Hayes, MoA Ister or Devlsadero Street Care) 

Best located and healthiest Stable in b in Pranolsoo. Always a good roadster on hand for 
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Fine Pasturage. 

No Wire Fencing. Good Box Stalls 
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given horses in any manner tbat owners may 
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MRS. M L CHA8E, Sonoma, Cal. 



RACING! 




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OAKLAND TRACK 

Six or More Races Each Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE 

RACES COMMENCE AT 2 P. M. SHARP 

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thereafter every twenty minutes. No smoking in 

their esco?"' Wb ' Cl1 reSe " ed f0r ladles >M 
Returning, train 3 leave Track after fifth and 

i&si rsccfl. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS. President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



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PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
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Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary Stree 
San Francisco. Cal. 



January 13 1906J 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 



Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICE 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 447. 

Telephone: Black 586. 



Terms-One Tear S3, Six Months SI. 75 Three months SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent bv postal order, draft or by registered 
letter addressed to F. W. Kblley, 36 Geary St., San Francisco, 
California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not neoessarily for publication, but as a private guar- 
antee of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 13, 1906 



California Stake Payments Due in 1906. 



Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes. 

(Payments should be made to F. W. Kelley, secre- 
tary, 36 Geary street, San Francisco.) 

Stake No. 3. $6000, foals of 1903— $10 due April 1. 
1906. and starting payment of $50 on three-year-old 
trotters and $35 on three-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No. 4, $6000, foals of 1904— $10 due March 1. 
1906, and starting payment of $35 on two-year-old 
trotters and $25 on two-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No 5, $7000, foals of 1905— $10 due February 
1, 1906. 

Stake No. 6, $7000, foals of 1906— $5 due May 1, 
1906, and $5 due October 1, 1906. 

Stanford Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Stanford Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— $10 due June 
1. 1906, and starting payment of $20 ten days before 
State Fair opens. 

Stanford Stake of 1907, foals of 1904— $10 due June 
1, 1906. 

Occident Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albeit L'ndley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Occident Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— Starting pay- 
ment of $50 due 30 days before the race. 

— o 

A STRONG SENTIMENT against race track gam- 
bling has sprung up among the people of Los Angeles 
and an effort is being made to have the Board of 
Supervisors pass an ordinance prohibiting betting on 
all racing events At the meeting of the Super- 
visors last Monday a crowd of people headed by a 
number of preachers marched to the rooms of the 
Board and submitted their case. Attorneys appeared 
for the Ascot track managers and after speeches 
galore from both sides in which many silly and pre- 
posterous claims were made for and against the bene- 
fits and evils of racing, the matter was postponed for 
two weeks. Prior to this, however, three of the five 
Supervisors stated that they were not yet ready to 
close up the race track, and in all probability they 
will be besieged during the next two weeks by the 
partisans of both sides and deluged with "argu- 
ments" pro and con on the matter of race legislation. 
Ascot track is outside the limits of the city of Los 
Angeles, which already has an anti-betting law, con- 
sequently the people who desire to see the race track 
closed have appealed to the County Supervisors. One 
significant fact in connection with the petition pre- 
sented was that it was signed by over fifteen thou- 
sand persons and was supported by resolutions passed 
by the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce. Merchants 
and Manufacturers' Association, and other organiza- 
tions of the leading business men of the southern 
metropolis. Every Los Angeles daily paper but one 
is arrayed against the race track and that it will 
eventually be placed under the ban of the law is 
pretty certain. It will be in the natural order of 
things for such a condition to obtain. When a pendu- 
lum is swung far to one side it naturally swings back 
SIXTEEN— Breeder 1-11— M 

as far the other way. Neither the Los Angeles peo- 
ple nor the residents of other places on this coast 
are opposed to horse racing and incidental betting 
when conducted for short periods, but it is the con- 
tinuous racing that has given the goody goodies a 
chance to begin a crusade and secure a very large 
following of business men who have heretofore seen 
no particular harm in the sport of horse racing Now 
that they are excited to a state of fanaticism they 
will probably try to secure the passage of laws that 
will stop betting on races altogether. It will be 
unfortunate for the horse breeding interests if they 
succeed. 



PROTESTS ARE SO NUMEROUS against the 
abuses of the privileges of the road by automobilists, 
that one necessarily concludes that the devil wagon 
is increasing greatly in popularity with the "pin 
heads." The writer stood at the railroad station at 
Niles, Alameda county, a few Sundays ago, and saw 
at least twenty of the benzine buggies pass within 
half an hour. The conductor of a waiting train called 
his attention to the fact that the majority of them 
were exceeding the speed limit and some of them 
running as fast as thirty miles an hour. He timed 
several Between two mile-posts and was sure they 
were running faster than twenty miles. Imagine 
twenty road drivers passing any point on the road 
within a half hour, and half of them driving their 
horses at a three-minute gait. Arrests would follow 
so quickly that fast road driving would soon be very 
unpopular in that section. Is it any wonder that 
accidents are so numerous when the auto owners 
violate nearly every rule of the road as well as of 
common sense whenever they go out. A chaffeur who 
was arrested for fast driving on that road recently 
stated that he was not running his machine faster 
than eight miles an hour anywhere between Oakland 
and San Jose The distance is forty-five miles. He 
afterwards bor.sted to a number of his friends, how- 
ever, that he made the entire trip in an hour and a 
half. One thing is certain — he is either a poor 
mathematician or a good prevaricator. 

o 

WHAT ABOUT A CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT? Are 
things to be allowed to drift along as they have for 
the past three years, when after lots of hot air about 
a circuit of eight or ten weeks being assured, it has 
dwindled to three or four meetings? We hope not. 
There can be a good circuit arranged, but some one 
must take the lead in the matter and bring the man- 
agers of the different tracks together. Dates will 
have to be arranged and purses announced. This all 
takes time and there is no time to lose. The sooner 
the track managers get together the better for all 
concerned. Quite a large number of the horse owners 
in California have stated that this year they propose 
to wait until a circuit is arranged before they place 
their horses in actual training. They want to have 
something in sight before they begin spending their 
money to get it It therefore behooves all track 
managers and all associations intending to hold meet- 
ings this year to get a move on and let the horsemen 
know what to expect. 

o 

At the combination sale of trotters and pacers held 
in the new Coliseum at the Union Siock Yards, Chi- 
cago, the week after the close of the International 
Live Stock Exposition, the highest price was $3,500 
paid for the trotter Axcyell 2:10%, which was pur- 
chased by a New England fancier. 



Chas. Whitehead is jogging Mr. J. B. Iverson's great 
gelding North Star 2:13% at the Salinas track. The 
son «f Nutwood Wilkes has been turned out since 
the close of his three-year-old campaign last year, 
during which he won all the three-year-old trotting 
stakes in California and earned over $5000 for his 
owner. 



Star Pointer 1:59%, besides being the first two- 
minute horse is the holder of many best records in 
races. He has the fastest race record, 2:00%; the 
fastest third heat, 2:00%, and the fastest three-heat 
race, 2:02%, 2:03%, 2:03%, all to his credit, which 
shows that his title of champion race horse is well 
founded. And he is producing speed from all sorts 
of mares. He now has four in the 2:10 list, headed 
by Morning Star 2:06%, that next to Cresceus brought 
the highest price at the recent Old Glory sale — 
$10,500. There was not a handsomer horse in all that 
1000 sold than Morning Star. 



The Fasig- Tipton Co , who have their offices in the 
great tower of Madison Square Garden, and who 
practically sell all the trotters and thoroughbreds 
which go under the hammer in New York, report the 
greatest year in the history of the firm. The fig- 
ures tell the story. At their various sales 5000 
horses were sold for a total of $2,775,000, as against 
1904 with $2,710,000. Their phenomenal time was in 
November and December, when in thirty days they 
turned over $997,980. Their old Glory sale of trot- 
ters and the Rancho del Paso sale of thoroughbreds 
were both record breakers. 



Representatives from every driving club of New 
Jersey attended a meeting at Newark recently upon 
the invitation of Adam II. Oroel, president of the 
Road Horse Association of New Jersey. The object 
of the gathering was to form a state organization 
of road drivers, and about a dozen different clubs 
sent delegates. A committee was appointed to draft 
a constitution and by-laws, the object being to pro- 
tect their rights upon the highways of the stale, and 
much interest is being manifested for the final out- 
come 



It is said that Samuel K. Hyde, fall River. Mass., 
has refused an offer of $15,000 for the three-year-old 
colt Silence by Chimes, out of Whisper 2.08%. 



Barney Demarest has sold York Boy 2:08% to J. 
Boyd Thatcher. ex-Mayor of Albany, N. Y., for $700. 



Sidney Dillon is beyond the reach of most Cali- 
fornia breeders, but they should remember that his 
full brother. Cupid 2:18, is still here, and for his 
opportunities is a great sire of speed. He has sired 
Venus II 2.11%. Zambia 2:14%. Psyche 2:16% and 
Lottie Parks 2:16%, and these are about the only 
ones of his get that have started in races Mr. A. B. 
Spreckels has consigned a number of young Cupids to 
the sale of Aptos Ranch horses which Fred H. Chase 
& Co. will hold in this city some time in February. 
There will also be offered at this sale young trotters 
and pacers by Dexter Prince and Aptos Wilkes, the 
latter an own brother to the famous mare Hulda 
2:08%. 

Over a dozen horsemen inspected this week the 
new McMurray Speed Cart just received by the Ken- 
ney Manufacturing Company at 531 Valencia street 
and without exception every one pronounced it "the 
best yet " It has a low seat, is very light and is so 
adjusted that all the weight comes on the wheels 
and not on the horse. Go out and look it over. 



When, a year ago, Frank Turner purchased from 
the estate of Henry Pierce all the mares, stallions, 
colts and fillies located at the Santa Rosa Stock Farm, 
he paid $10,000 for them and took a lease of the farm. 
He has just sold to Sterling Holt of Indiana, twenty- 
two head of colts and fillies, getting over $12,000 for 
them, and has all the brood mares and several stal- 
lions and youngsters lea. He has made a nice profit 
on the deal and every horseman in California will 
be glad to know that he has done so well. 



On the first of January all colts and fillies took on 
another year in reckoning their age, no matter at 
what season of the year they were born. 



Frank Wire of Davisville has a pair of fine large 
black driving horses for sale. See advertisement. 



Bonnie Steinvvay, son of Steinway, and the great 
brood mare Bon Bon 2:26, dam of Bonnie Direct 2:05% 
and Bonsilene 2:14%, by Simmons, has filled out into 
one of the grandest looking stallions ever seen at the 
Pleasanton track His owner, Mr. C. L. Griffith, ex- 
pects this horse to take low record this year. He 
has speed enough to pace a mile below 2:10 and 
worked miles below 2:12 last summer. 



Many horses are being jogged at the different Cali- 
fornia training tracks, and many colts and fillies are 
being broken, but none of the trainers are trying to 
make any speed, and will not until the middle of 
February. 



Geo. A. Kelly of Pleasanton, owner of Bonnie McK., 
sold a foal of 1905 by him last week for $200, and 
$500 was refused for another foal by the same sire. 



C. X Larrabee is fitting up several carloads of 
horses bred on his Brook-Nook Ranch. Montana, for 
the eastern market. Mr. Larrabee breeds about 200 
mares every year to his own stallions and last yeir 
raised 135 foals. 



Members of the Pasadena Tournament of Roses 
Association, headed by E. D. Neff. are the promoters 
of the horse show which will be given in Pasadena 
March 8, 9 and 10 The name of E. A. Ashbrook. the 
eastern horse show expert, who has announced his 
willingness to aid in establishing an annual show in 
Los Angeles, is being considered for the position of 
manager. With the stables of the 200 millionaire fam- 
ilies of Pasadena and the many fine animals in Los 
Angeles to draw from, the success of the entry list 
should be complete. 



Josie 2:08%, a member of the 1905 string of the 
East View Farm, is now in the stable of James 
Burns, Toronto, out. She is a sister to Billy Red 
2: 10. 



Only four stallions have each sired thirty or more 
performers with records of 2:15 or better. McKinney 
2:11% by Alcyone 2:27, thirty-nine; Gambetta Wilkes 
2:19%, thirty, three; Alcantara 2:23. thirty-one. and 
Baron Wilkes 2:18, thirty. Al these stallions were 
got by George Wilkes 2:22 McKinney is the youngest, 
having been foaled in 1887, Baron Wilkes foaled in 
1882, next; Gambetta Wilkes, foaled in 1881, next, and 
Alcantara, foaled in 1876, the oldest. 

HEARD ON THE TELEPHONE. 



"Hello, Breeder & Sportsman!" 
"Hello!" 

"This Is Sandy, down at Aptos Ranch. Say; I 
would like to state through your columns that the 25 
horses to be sold by Fred Chase & Co. for Mr. A. 1',. 
Spreckels early in February are all looking fine an 1 
doing well." 

"All right, Sandy, we will so state." 
"And say; there Is a full sister to Venus II 2:11',, 
that is coming six years old, among them, and she is 
as good or better than Venus; she is a line trotter 
and has shown quarters in 36 seconds over this half- 
mile track, which you know is not a fast one. And 
say! That three-year-old gelding by Dexter Prince 
out of the Stamboul mare, dam of Zambia 2:14%, is 
a sure enough trotter and in good hands can earn a 
whole lot of money. I think the fellow is lucky who 
goes lo the sale and get these two. as he would have 
stable that can win money on any circuit. Thai's 
all. just now. Good bye." 
"Good bye, Sandy." 



1 



(The $rg*fe££ ani* &p&vt#txxat\ 



[January 13, 1906 



MILE OR HALF-MILE TRACK. 

San Luis Obispo, Jan. 3, 1906. 
Kd. Breeder & Sportsman: — Would you kindly give 
me your opinion as to which is the best track for a 
small town like this to build and maintain. We are 
going to build a track — that is a settled fact. Some 
want a mile, but the majority are in favor of a half- 
mile. Do good horse? race in California cn half-mile 
tracks? How much land does it take for a half-miie 
track giving sufficient room for stables, etc.? How 
much throw-up ought the turns to have? And which 
is the best way to lay it out? And any other infor- 
mation on the subject would be accepted with the 
kindest thanks and appreciation. 

Very' respectfully, 

GEO. W. McCABE. 

The ques!icn as to which is the best track is a 
question of money and resources. If the people in- 
terested in building a track at San Lui ; Obispo have 
plenty cf money to buy land, buiid a mile track and 
keep it in order, then it is the one to choose. The 
history of the majority of mile tracks in small towns, 
however, is that they cost loo much to build and 
maintain, and unless a large number of horses can be 
kept in constant training and successful meetings or 
fairs given every year, they soon fall into disuse and 
are elephant? on the hands cf these who manage 
them. In the first place thirty or thirty-five acres 
are sufficient for a good half-mile track, 60 feet in 
width, and for the stalls, stands and other necessary 
buildings, while a mile track require? about fifty-five 
acres at least. A half-mile track only requires hall 
the amount to construct, and cne man and team can 
keep it in good order the year round and the expense 
of sprinkling (a heavy one in California during the 
summer months) is but half that required for a mile 
track. Good horses race over half-mile tracks in 
California and in every other State in the Union if 
good purses are offered. Some of the greatest meet- 
ings held in the Eastern States are on half-mile 
rings, and many horses that go east from California 
every year, race on half-mile circuits. 

One of the greatest crowds that gathers anywhere 
during the year to see harness racing is at Allentown, 
Pa., where between 80,000 and 100,000 people congre- 
gated last year to see the champion, Dan Patch, go 
against time. A well built half-mile track kept in 
order, will not lack for horses to train over it, and on 
the sizes of the purse? given, and the ability of the 
Secretary to rustle, will depend the class of horses 
that will race over it. We believe there are many 
towns in California where mile tracks are now in a 
bad condition and not patronized that would be the 
centres of considerable training were the tracks but 
a half-mile in circumference and kept in order. A 
mile track is the best beyond a doubt, all things being 
equal, but it is a little more than the majority of as- 
sociations can properly care for. To lay out a half- 
mile track: 

First— <Draw two parallel lines 600 feet long and 
452 feet and 5 inches apart. 

Second — Drive a stake half way between the ex- 
treme ends of these two lines. 

Third — Loop a wire around this stake long enough 
to reach to either fide and make a true curve, put- 
ting down a stake as often as a fence post is needed. 

Fourth — When this operation is finished at both 
ends of the 600-foot parallel lines, the track is laid 
out. The inside fence will rest exactly on the lines. 

The turns should be thrown up at least an inch to 
the foot, and if fast time is expected an inch and an 
eighth to the foot is not too much. Mirny half-mile 
tracks are but forty-five feet wide, but one that Is 
sixty feet in width would be a great deal better as it 
would accommodate a larger field cf horses. 

A LESSON IN DRAFT HORSE BREEDING. 



The last issueof the Breeders Gazette of Chicago 
contained the following: 

One lesson taught once more at the recently held 
International was that a stallion to beget drafters 
that will sell for the great sums now so freely paid 
for high clas = geldings must have in addition to 
many other qualities what is known as a "good out- 
look." Being interpreted this means that a stal- 
lion to be a great success as a gelding getter must 
have a pair of sloping shoulders a long neck and 
a good head properly set on the thin end of that 
neck. To look well in harness a gelding must have 
plenty of his neck in front of his collar and as the 
collars used in the show ring especially and on the 
street in general on heavy drafter- are large and 
broad the neck must ccme out of well laid oblique 
shoulders which lay the collar well back. If then the 
neck is of proper length both on top and below the 
gelding will look well proportioned, whereas if he is 
short of his neck and his shoulders are straight 
merely his head will stick out in front of his collar 
and he will not appear to be well balanced, which 
will militate against him greatly not only in appear- 
ance but in the matter of his action for no one 
ever knew a straight-shouldered horse to be an elastic- 
goer in front. There is no reason why a stallion 
cannot be very compact of build and yet have a good 
long neck and generally good outlook to him and 
those who are determined to get some of the money 
that is so freely offered for high-class geldings should 
make'a note of it that they will never attain the top 
of the ladder if they make use of short-necked low- 
headed stallions. 



Kinney Lou 2:07%. the popular son of the champion 
sire, is in fine physical condition. He was never so 
rugged, stout and healthy as at the present time. 
The 10 to IS miles he gets every day are hardly 
sufficient to keep him from performing the antics 
of a two-year-old. 



GETTING A CORNER ON THE SIDNEY DILLONS. 

When the millionaire horseman. Mr. Sterling R. 
Holt of Indianapolis, paid $9000 at auction in 1904 
for Sidney Dillon he made about the best bargain in 
horse flesh that has been recorded for some time. 
Before the season of 1905 was over the horse had 
earned his purchase price for Mr. Holt and his book 
for 1906 will be filled at an increased fee before the 
season really opens. Mr. Holt came to California 
on a business trip last week and visited Frank Turn- 
er's Santa Rosa Stock Farm, where he became so 
enamored of the youngsters by his horse that he pur- 
chased twenty-five head of them, or nearly all that 
were in Sonoma county. He made the purchase with 
the assistance of Millard Sanders, the well known 
trainer, who gave Lou Dillon and Dolly Dillon their 
records and Mr. Sanders will have them all in charge 
at Pleasanton during the winter and spring and will 
probably take them to Indianapo'.is about May 1st. 
Among those purchased from Mr. Turner are eight 
jearlings out of the farm's best mares and the fol- 
lowing two. three and four year olds: Carrie Dillon 
3. Carlocita 4. clay Dillon 3. Lottie Dillon 3, Adioo 
Dillon 3 Sonoma Dillon 2. Santa Rosa Dillon 2, Ruth 
Dillon 2. Martha Dillon 2. Sadie Dillon 2. Kate Dillo.i 
2. Mifs Silney Dillon 5, and Rose Dillon 4. Mr. Holt 
also purchased three Sidney Dillons from Mr. S. H. 
Wright, and one from Joe Cuiccllo. The aggregate 
amount paid for the entire lot was in the neighbor- 
hood of $16,000. 

There are many of these celts and fillies with speed 
enough to trot or pace clo3; to 2:10 this year. Carlo- 
cita took a time record last year of 2:24%. and Carrie 
Dillon one of 2:24%. They could have paced much 
faster, but were held back so as to just enter the 
standard list, and not get records that would bar 
them from class racing. Both worked miles below 
2:20 during the season. 

Mr. Holt has shown excellent judgment in purchas- 
ing these young Sidney Dillons, and under Mr. San- 
der's tutelage they will doubtless add much fame to 
Sidney Dillon as a sire. While there are seven or 
eight of Sidney Dillon's older foals scattered through- 
out the State, these youngsters comprise about all the 
youngsters by him that there are in the State. 

Frank Turner still owns three royally bred young 
stallions by Sidney Dillon, having refused an offer 
of $6000 for them made by Mr. Holt. They will be in 
the stud this year at the Santa Rosa Stock Farm. 
Besides Sidney Dillon, Mr. Holt owns the young Cali- 
fornia stallion Sterling McKinney, and the stallion 
Rex Americus. His farm is known as Maplewood 
Farm and is one of the show places of Indianapolis. 

THE HORGAN FUTURITY STAKE. 

The Futurity Stake for yearlings which was in- 
augurated by Mr. P. J. Horgan of Concord closed 
January 1st with twelve entries. The entrance 
money to this stake is $15. of which $5 accompanied 
nominations January 1st. The race is for foals of 
1905. bred in Contra Costa county, and will be de- 
cided at the Concord track in September, at which 
time it is hoped a county fair and race meeting will 
be given, but if not the race will come off anyway. 
The money is to be divided 50. 35 and 15 per cent, 
and $50 is to be added to the stake by Mr. John Ott 
of Paeheco. The entries for the Horgan Futurity are 
as follows: 

Captain I. E. Durham of Concord — Colt by Dictatus; 
dam Conductor. 

Ray McDonald of Concord — Colt by Dictatus; dam 
by Jim Mulvaney. 

Mr. Lewis of Miartinez — Colt by Dictatus; dam by 
Sidmoor. 

George Whitman of Concord — Colt by Dictatus: 
dam by Stein way. 

R. C. Caven of Concord — Colt by Sidmoor; dam by 
Abbottsford Jr. 

H. H. Elworthy of Ccncord— Colt by Dictatus; dam 
ay Conductor. 

J. T. Flemming of Concord — Colt by Sidmoor; dam 
by Sidney. 

H. C. Keller of Concord— Colt by Sidmoor; dam 

by . 

Jesse Morgan of Clayton — Colt by Sidmoor; dam by 
son of Direct. 

John Ott of Pachecc— Colt by Sidmoor; dam by 

Alcona. 

J. M. Christopher of Paeheco— Colt by Sidmoor; dam 
by Nevada Chief. 

L. R. Palmer of Walnut Creek— Colt by Stam B.; 
dam by Delwin. 

AUCTION SALE AT PHOENIX. 

During the recent Arizona Territorial Fair, held at 
Phoenix. Mr. J. C. Adams, the well known horse 
breeder, held a sale. A few of the prices paid were 

as follows: 

Boydello 2:14%. bay stallion by Boydell. to Louis 
Melczer for $450. 

Yedrel Russell, two-year-old by L. W. Russell dam 
Yedrel by Nutwood, to Mr. Goebel for $225. 

Miss Russell, by L. W. Russell, to S. Easterlins for 
$235. 

Miss McDello. by Boydello to Ralph Quinn for 
$475. 

Golden Rose, to Dr. J. C. Norton for $325. 

Black Bird, to Mr. Abrams for $230. 

Miss Nyra. to Mr. Stetson, Los Angeles for $300. 



"A few years after people gits too old to believe in 
Santy Claus." said Uncle Eben, "deys apt to stadt in 
hellevin' in race-hoss tips." 

o 

Of the six horses that won $10,000 or over during 
the racing season of 1905 three of them were three 
year olds. 



HOOF BEATS 

Since the death of Dr William Finlaw at Santa 
Rosa, a number of the horses owned by him at the 
time of his death have been sold by Mrs. Finlaw. 
and the sales confirmed by the Superior Court. The 
sales included a number of yearlings and other horses 
owned by the estate. Among the sales confirmed 
were the following: Ten colts to Sam Morris for 
$500. one span work horses to Frank Steele for $155 
one yearling to W. H. Sutherland for $75. two horses 
to Mrs. C. R. Farmer for $450, yearling to White for 
$60. yearling and colt to W. Dryden for $65. one 
horse to Dr Fay for $75, one mare to C. H. Durand 
for $100, yearling to C. W. Jessup for $65, yearling 
to John La vail for $60. horse to Mrs. E. B. Miller for 
$300. six brood mares and one colt to Mrs Miller 
for $825. 

Capt. C H. Williams of Palo Alto owns a sixteen- 
months-old Searchlight colt that is one or the grand- 
est natural trotters ever seen. He has never been 
on a track, but to a long shaft breaking cart on the 
road steps out like a future champion. The captain 
says he aims to break Cresceus" record with this 
fellow. 



Capt. C. H. Williams of Palo Alto Is very enthusi- 
ast i< over a Searchlight colt he owns out of Twenty- 
third ,dam of Sterling McKinney. trial 2:16) by 
Director 2:17, second dam Nettie Nutwood, dam oi 
Hillsdale 2:15, by Nutwood 2:18%. and will soon 
place him in "Jack" Phippen's stable at San Jose. 
On account of being foaled in September the captain 
did not enter him in any stakes but intends to give 
him a little work each year and develop him slowly 
and safely, hoping and believing he will have a great 
horse when fully matured. The individuality and 
breeding of the colt certainly justify his hopes He 
is a blocky, strong made fellow, the counterpart of 
his great sire and while only seventeen months old 
looks a well developed two-year-old now and is al- 
ways on a trot, showing no inclination to pace. 



The five-year-old mare Helen Keyes by Sidney 
Dillon, owned by Harry D. Brown of Pleasanton, is 
one of the good prospects for a fast performer during 
the present year. She was taken east by Chas. De 
Ryder last year but was not started. She has trotted 
a trial in 2:12 and looks a 2:10 per former sure. Mr. 
Brown recently refused an offer for her made by 
Millard Sanders. 



Mr. Geo Reed, manager of the Anderson Fruit 
Company of Suisun. has recently purchased the chest- 
nut pacing stallion Comet Wilkes 2:21 and is driving 
him on the road. Mr. Reed is one of the best amateur 
•'rivers in the state and is very much pleased with 
his new purchase. Comet Wilkes was bred by (re- 
late William Corbitt and is by Guy Wilkes, dam 
Mamie Comet 2:23% by Nutwood. 



A lawyer owned a horse that always stopped and 
refused to cross a certain bridge leading out of the 
town. Neither whipping nor coaxing would move the 
horse when he approached this bridge. The disciple 
of Blackstone therefore advertised him for sale in 
this manner: "Horse for sale: to be sold for no other 
reason than that the owner wants to get out of 
town." 



That the United States Government is finding the 
supply of horses short is evidenced by the bids for 
cavalry and artillery horses which were opened at 
Seattle on the 5th inst. The Quartermaster's De- 
partment advertised for horses suitable for the Philip- 
pine service, and the lowest bid was that of Chas. 
H. Frey of Seattle, who offered to supply 200 head at 
$129 each. 



Lord Alwin. the pacing three-year-old stallion, own 
brother to John A. McKerron 2:04%, is in Chas. 
DeRyder's string at Pleasanton. He is owned by 
Martin Carter and is not only a very handsome but a 
very fast colt. An eighth in 15 seconds seemed easy 
for him. Mr. Carter bred him to two or three of his 
best mares last year and expects to make a sire of 
him. 



Mr. E. A. Servis of Durham. Butte county, owner of 
that fast pacer Edwin S. 2:08, is now at Pleasanton 
and will probably remain there during the rest of 
the winter season. His time will be occupied with 
his horses until after the rainy season, when they 
will be turned over to a regular trainer. 



A Shetland pony mare named Belle, owned at the 
historic Woodbuin Farm in Kentucky, produced a 
living foal when she was thirty years old. The young- 
ster was a mere pigmy when born, but lived about 
30 days. Many cases of Shetland mares remaining 
productive far beyond the usual equine limit are re- 
corded, but this one is among the most remarkable. 



Lupe Carillo was at Pleasanton last week and states 
that Mr. A. W. Shippee will probably send down 
a string of colts from his Butte county ranch to be 
worked if stall room for them can be had. 



A gcod stiff price was recently refused by A. Morris 
Fosdick of Los Angeles for a weanling filly by Kinney 
Lou. dam Athene by Dexter Prince, second dam 
Athena 2:15% by Electioneer, third dam Ashby. dam 
of two better than 2:17 by Gen. Benton. Mr. Fosdick 
is so pleased with the filly that he has booked the 
dam again to the greatest son of McKinney. "Jack" 
Phippen is now jogging Athene and she will be fitted 
to take a record this coming season: as she has lots 
of speed a very fast mark is expected. 



January 13 191 6j 



5 



THOROUGHBRED DEPARTMENT. 

By Ralph H. Tozer. 
The bad showing of Beat-catcher last Saturday at 
Emeryville In the Pollansbee Handicap and the ex- 
tra good performance of the winner, Barney Schreib- 
er'a bay three-year-old colt, Dr„ Gardner, with 116 
pounds up. are the principal topics discussed In turf 
circles, it seems that G-arnett Ferguson had done 
little with "the Bear" since he won his three-cornered 
$2500 race at Ascot Park, and when he stumbled after 
going about a quarter it was all og — the horse drop- 
ped further and further to the rear and refused to 
try a yard. As to Dr. Gardner, he took up 116 pounds 
and ran seven furlongs in the same notch as when 
carrying 88 pounds, viz., 1 : 25 V^. and apparently did it 
just about as easily with the big weight up as with 
the feather. Dr. Gardner is a product of Missouri, 
but his sire and dam (Bannockbum and Uarda) both 
raced considerably In California. Bannockburn held 
the mile record at both Emeryville and Tanforan 
(1:39) for years. Tarda was campaigned here by a 
tall Tennesseean named Brownlow. Previous to com- 
ing here [Tarda had beaten Martha II (dam of the 
great Artful) for the Oaks at Oakley (Cincinnati) and 
had besides won the Kentucky Oaks at Louisville. In 
California Uarda was a pronounced cripple, and we 
saw her at her worst, though she was a magnificent 
bay mare over It! hands In height and exceedingly 
"racy-looking." I remember offering the peppery 
Brownlow $900 or $1000 for Prada (I lorget which) on 
oehalf of Prince Poniatowski, "provided she was 
sound enough to train on." lirnwnlow would not 
guarantee that Uarda would stand training, and 
waxed very wroth over the matter, declaring that no 
one could get her for $!5000 if she was sound." Just 
how much Schrciber paid for her I never heard, but 
it is safe betting he did not give more than $1000 for 
the daughter of Slrathmnre and /.uhlan that has given 
to the world the speed marvel. Dr. Gardner. 

Speaking of Uarda makes me think what a magnifi- 
cent collection of stud matrons Schreiber has and 
how very reasonable in price was each and every 
one. I can't call to mind a single high priced mare on 
the place, and yet he has good-lookers bred on the 
most fashionable lines that produce stake horses 
right off the reel. He has far and away the best 
string of race horses at Emeryville. 

There are two young mares in this state not 
owned by breedt is that night to prove wonderful in 
the producing line when put to the stud. One is 
Melodius, the big black four-year-old mare by Sir 
Dixon (leading sire of America a few seasons ago) 
out of Kentucky Belle (latter an own sister to Han- 
over (leading sire of America for four successive sea- 
sons). More great brood mares figure in the first five 
generations of Melodius' pedigree than perhaps any 
mare on this continent, and a host of champion sires 
as well The other mare is also bred on "taking" lines, 
being by the unbeaten Meddler (champion sire of 
America in 11104 and third in 1905) out of a mare by 
Russell (winner of $83,192 and a great sire), he by 
Eolus (siie of Morello, Diablo, Eole, St. Saviour, Eon. 
Knight of Eller.-lio, etc.) As Meddler's daughters are 
superior in the racing line to his sons, doubtless they 
will also be in the producing line, and therefore 
breeders should aim to secure the sort of mares 
spoken of above. 

Dr. Leggo's easy victory at seven furlong- in 1:261,4 
last Monday makes one believe he is himself again, 
and that being the case he should prove troublesome 
in any company from this time forth. 

East Monday was the anniversary «:f the battle of 
New Orleans, and it was celebrated properly in the 
Crescent City. A peculiar thing was that the two 
stake events (the Old Hic kory Handicap at City Park 
and the Jackson Handic ap at the Cresc ent City track) 
were won by California bred horses, viz., Alma no- 
tour (by imp. Artillery) and Phi] Pinch (by Imp. 
Goldfinch), both natives of Sacramento County. 
1 

Waterflower, by imp. Water* res-Pansy by Virgil, 
and about the best two-year-old filly of 1905 in Eng- 
land, is thought to have a royal chance In the historic 
oaks )f this year. She was bred at Kancho del Paso. 



The leading turf authorities of Hngand are advo- 
cating the stoppage of two-year-old racing In, Great 
Britain until June 1st of each year. What a blessing 
it would be to the breed of racers if our governing 
turf bodies could be made to see the evil in its true 
light and act accordingly. Then we would have later 
foals with stronger mothers that would give their 
offspring better food and more- of it than under the 
present plan, the two-year-olds would In con -c*|uenec 
be better develop* d and stamina woulcl not be sac ri- 
ficed at the altar of speed. 



Barney Schreiber has won about twice as much as 
any other owner at the local tracks, his record up 
to this week being $15 105, against $7,700 for W. B. 
Jennings and $7,034 for W. W. Elliott. Hadtke was 
in like position among the jockeys, with 52 wins 
against 86 for M< Bride and 32 for W. Knapp. Bear- 
catcher Is the best of the older horses. Dr. Gardnei 
in a class by himself as a three-year-old, while the 
two-year-olds have been sec-sawing so much that one 
Is constrained to think they are either a gilt-edged 
lot or a very mediocre bunch. 



The effort of the Eos Angeles "goody-goads" to 
close Ascot Park came to naught last Monday night, 
and doubtless they will be "good dogs" and "lay 
dead" for awhile, the Supervisors voting ('■' to 2) not 
to Instruct the District Attorney to draw a county 
ordinance against gambling. The dally newspapers, 
with one exception, flayed the Ascot people unmerci- 
fully, but the hotelkeepers furnished the racing folks 
figures that showed conclusively and at a glance that 
the race meeting brought hundreds of people and 



thousands of dollars that would not otherwise have 
been there. As a means of circulating coin Scarcely 
anything excels a ra< ing meeting and men bants make 
more out of a racegoer in a week than they would 
from a psalm-Singer or consumptive in three- months. 

E. Oorrigan bought the 272 shares of City Park 
(New Orleans) stock owned by "Curly" Brown at 
$100 per share, and the matter was settled out of 
court. 

Last Tuesday, after Romalne had easily encom- 
passed the defeat of Instructor, the- California Jockey 
Club stewards- got together and were not long in 
deciding that McBrlde had 'pulled" Romalne on the 
8th of January, when Instructor had apparent!) beaten 
the Brutus horse with ease by one and a half lengths 
at six furlongs. Itoniaine. in other words, had shown 
an improvement in I.. Williams' hands of about ten 
pounds. Of course one hates to see a rider of Mc- 
Bride's ability driven from the turl. while "the man 
behind" goes sen; free, but the stewards' dec ision met 

with approbation on all sides, t was prompt 
and right and they made no mistake. P. Phillips was 
also suspended tor his ride on Bell Reed, the gelding 
opining at 3 to 1 and going to 7 to 1. with the book- 
ies yelling for the coin. Reed's race was run accord- 
ing to "the chalk." The chart shows the spec I. v 
fid'.ow to have been ii-.ff first and winding up seventh 
In an eight-horse race, beaten a block by horses that 
lie ordinarily * an down as badly as they heal him. 
It was a bad-1 inking ride, the contrast between this 
race and the others Phillips rude on Be II Reed being 
very marked. 



The number 


of 


Jockeys who had 


mounts in 


SOU 


races last year 


was 862. 


■of 


U 1m HO 


192 rode ten or 


more winners, 


244 


rode 


fron 


one 


I ci nine 


winners, 


and 426 failed 


to 


finish 


first 


In any race. 


Jockeys 


who rode more 


than 100 


winners * 


lach w c 


?re: 
















Un- 




Jockeys — 




Mts. 


1st. 


2d. 


3d. p 


laced. 


Pet. 


Nlcol 




. 857 


221 


143 


136 


361 


.26 


W. Knapp 




1021 


180 


158 


139 


538 


.18 






. 888 


178 


127 


122 


451 


.20 


Radtke 




693 


177 


129 


97 


290 


. 25 


J. Martin 




739 


143 


119 


93 


384 


.15 


Sewell 




. 696 


129 


1 10 


101 


356 


.19 


C. Morris 




718 


123 


109 


mo 


382 


. 17 


R. McDaniel 




. 757 


118 


97 


110 


432 


.15 








106 


75 


78 


296 


.19 








105 


97 


84 


233 


.20 


E. Morrison 




477 


105 


92 


62 


218 


.22 






497 


106 




73 


242 


.21 






687 


L03 


91 


108 


385 


.15 


Hlldebrand . . 




523 


103 


90 


85 


245 


.20 








-o 











■ ■ — i — o — » — 

DOPING HARNESS HORSES. 



"Doping" harness horses is a theme of discussion 
just now among tho-e interested In the trotters and 

pacers, and Dr. J. C. McCoy of Klrkw I, Del., who 

Is an expert In training horses, as well as a physician 

of wide attainments and a BClenl i lie farmer on a 
large scale, has contributed an Interesting paper on 

the subject to oi ( the turf journals. "I '< > i >i hk" 

runners, where the races are all dashes, is compara- 
tively a slmph' matter, but in the ease of trotters 
there Is the necessity of repeating the dose after every 
heat, so that possibly four en- five doses must be ad- 
ministered during : Bern ion. 

"Pop" Geers, the soul of honesty In all matters, 
never uses "the dope" but one- day, a couple of se-n- 
sons ago, he was engaged to drive a pacing man- of 
much speed but noted for faint- hen rtedness. The nag 
was trained In another stable-, and when she was 
handed to the Tennes-ean for the first heal she was 
gingered up to the last ounce. She- seined al a Iwci- 

tnlnute clip, and when the word was given falrlj 

floated the mile, seeming to touch only the high places. 
After she had strolled In on the chin strap, in nearly 
three seconds faster time than unyhud) thought s In ■ 
could make, Geers dismounte d regarded her atten- 
tively! and said: 'Well, dog my ra.s! They told me 
this mare would stop." -Why, slie-'s the games! thing 
I ever saw." 

That something decisive will have to he- clc anenl 

the use of "dope-" on trotters and pacers Is clear. 
There Is a rule in the books covering the matter, but 
it is Impossible to prove- any particular horse Is lixe-d 
for a certain race although in the last two seasons 
there has been at least two Instances In cla sh- races 
where the use of stimulants of an Improper character 
was more than suspected. 

In one Instance it enable-el a horse to go a wonder- 
ful fifth heat, and In the other it enabled a trotter to 
take a i ec ord will* h he since has beer unable- to equal. 
The only remedy for the evil thus far proposed Is 
that after B race- begins, all horses engaged therein 
shall be cooled out in an Inclosure which shall he- 
open to the- public view, and that officers shall see to 
It that no person other than the me-n engaged In car- 
ing for the horses Is admitted. It Is doubtful, how- 
ever. If such an arrangement would In the leasl ham- 
per the dopera. 

That a horse may be rendered temporarily In- 
capable of trotting at anything like lis normal speed 
and the trick done so artfully that even the- animal's 
attendant:- are not at (he time aware of the occur- 
rence has been demons! rat ed. It Is rather more- than 
suspected that cm one occasion E n Dillon win put 
out of business for S race which Mr. B lllngs was par- 
ticularly anxious to win, and for a lime I here w as 
a possibility the matter would be taken hold of In a 
way which woulcl have ended the- lurf career of one 
or two people-, but Inasmuch as 111*- people who In- 
spired Hie- act probably could not be brought to book 
the matter was not followed up, although the con- 
viction as to where the guilt lay was strong. 

As to "winning elope " tin- stuff must be of such 
character as materially to Increase the- lie-art action, 
anel it is no! Infrequently the result of its adminis- 



tration that excessive' heart dilation Is set up, and 
during the progress of a heal the animal falls dead 
on the track. 

It often has been asserted that horses were choked 
to death when they fell and expired em the rac e- track. 
But the medical authorities agree that no horse can 
be choked so that II will be dead whe n it falls, or 

Immediately after. They assert thai If a postmortem 

examination were to he- lie-Id in each instance- of a 
horse falling dead in the track while- going at speed, 
it WOUld be found that dilation of the- heart was the 
cause, and not choking. To show that this view of 
the- matter is the- correct one numerous Instances 
where horses have pulled so lion! that they finally 
ft II might be Cited. In all such cases, however, the 
animal was on Its feet a minute later and was unin- 
jured. 

The men in the harness racing game who usu 
"elope" have been pretty well sifted out by those who 
have an interest In c lean rac ing, and when the cam- 
paign of 1906 opens a careful watch on their opera- 
tions will in- Instituted. 

Although the plana c f those having the- malle-i- in 
charge- are- not fully formulated, It is understood that, 
at the princ ipal meetings, there- will be- In attendance 
a veterinary surgeon who will, in conjunction with 
the Judges of the day. keep an *•)*■ out for possible 
instances of 'doping." 

Bast summer, the talk goe-, there were several oc - 
casions where a horse was "doped" Just previous to 
a heat and then hacked straight and place for that 
particular heat. I!y not administering the- stimulant 
before 1 1 i r ■ next heat the animal was rendered ab- 
normally sluggish directly after a period of artificial 
animation and energy, his performances In the two 
heats thereby being made so Inconsistent that an un- 
deserve-d reputation for 'dogglne-ss" was the result. — 
II. T. While- in Ky. Stock Farm. 

THOROUGHBRED STALLION FEES IN ENG- 
LAND. 

English thoroughbred breeders have been adver- 
tising their stallions for the- past two months. It Is 
interest ing, in looking over the columns of the Lon- 
don Sportsman, to .note these advertisements ami 

to compare the prices at which these stallions are 
offered with the juices for which the best of the 

public stallions stand !n America i-'or instance, 

Rock Sand, a great race horse but absolutely untiled 
al the- stud, Is offered al 200 g linens a marc-. Ills 

book for bum; is already full ami subscriptions are 

being accepted for 1907. John o' Gaunt Is full for 

1906 and 1907 both, and subscriptions are now being 

booked at 99 guineas for 1908. Among the- other 

stallions for which no further subscriptions will be 

received for ne-xl year, but which are- advertised 
for the following' year, are Mlssellhrush, Collar and 
Robert le I liable. No horse of any prominence Is 
offered at less than 45 or 50 guineas a mare-, and 

manj of them are placed al from BO to 100 guinea:; 
a mare, while suc h horses as Plying Pox and a few 
others of great fame have had the limited number 
of outside subscriptions which their owners allowed 
eagerly taken at as muc h as 000 guineas the male. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

A. I). SMITH, Lindsay When an animal meets the 
following reiiulrements it can be registered as a stand- 
ard bred trotter: 

1. The progeny of a regl-lered standard trotting 
horse- and a registered standard trolling mare. 

2. A stallion sired by a registered standard trotting 
horse, provided his dam and grandam were sired by 
registered standard trotting horses, and he- himself 
has a trotting record of 2:30 and Is the sire of three 

trotters with records or 2:80, from different mares. 

3. A mare whose sin- Is a registered standard trot- 
ting horse-, and whose clam and grandam were- Hlre-d 
by registered standard trolling horses, provided she 
her.-olf has a trotting record of 2:30 or Is the- dam of 
One trotter with a re-eonl of 2:30. 

4. A mare sired by a registered standard trotting 
horse, provided she Is the dam of I wo trotters with 

records of 2:80. 

5. A mare sired by a registered standard trolling 
horse, prov ileel her first, second and third clam ,im- 
each sired by a registered standard trotting horse. 

When an animal meets the following rSQU I re-men Is 
It can be registered as a sta nd;i rd - brerl pacer: 

L. Tin- progeny of a registered standard pacing 
hor-e and a registered standard pacing mare. 

2. A stallion sired by a registered standard pacing 
horse-, | rovlded his dam and grandam were Sired by 
r< glstcreel standard pac ing horses, and lw himself has 
a paicng record of 2:25, and Is the sire of three- pacers 
with records oT 2:25. from dirt'erenl mares. 

3. A nunc whose sire is a registered standard pac - 
ing horse- ami whose- dam and grandam were sired by 
rcglsloroel standard pacing horses, provided she- herself 

has a pacing r rd of 2:25, or I- the dam of one 

pacer with a re* ord of 2:25. 

4. A mare sired by a registered standard pacing 
horse, provided she Is the dam of two pacers with 
records of 2:25. 

5. A man- sln-d by a registered standard pacing 
horse, provided he-r first, second anel third dams are 
each sired by a registered standard pacing horse. 

6. The progeny of a registered standard trotting 
horse out of a registered standard pacing mare, or of 
a registered standard pacing horse out of a registered 

standard trotting mare. 

A half mile track 60 feel wide, can be built on a 
strip of land 1170 reel long by 572 reel wide, whl*-h 
would make the- laud within the- boundary of the 
outside oval contain about sixteen acres, but there 
would be no room for grand stand or other buildings. 
From 30 to 35 acres are usually required for a public 



6 



[January 13, 19C6 



half mile track, but if built on a farm for private use, 
room for buildings, etc., would not be needed. There 
are many half mile tracks in this country that have 
been in use for a great many years with satisfactory 
results. 



R. Hiekingbottom, Seattle.— Glenelg, register num- 
ber 3183, was by Baymont, 1027, dam Miss Cole by 
.Milwaukee 603, grandam Lady Cole by Williams' 
Magna Charta, son of Magna Charta 105. We do not 
know the breeding of Grey Hal. Our Dick 2:10% 
is by Gibraltar 1185. Do not know- his exact age 
but be took his record in 1892 and had then been 
racing three years. 

Subscriber, Walla Walla —Minnie Princess, a chest- 
nut mare, owned for several years by William Cor- 
bltt, was foaled in 1879. She was bred by Robert 
Syer of San Jose. Her sire was Nutwood 600, her 
dam Belle by Paul's Abdullah, her second dam Kate 
Crockett by Lang-ford, son of Williamson's Belmont, 
her third dam Fanny by American Boy, Jr.. and her 
fourth dam Puss, said to be by Lance, son of Modoc. 
Minnie Princess is the dam of Leonora, that trotted 
in 2:25 at four years, and of Mignonette, that trotted 
in 2:34 at two years. 



F 8. Dashiell, Geyserville —There is a trotting 
stallion and also a thoroughbred stallion by the name 
of Red Wing. If you can give us a little further 
information about the horse in question, as to whether 
he is a trotter, pacer or runner, and- the name of his 
sire, we may be able to furnish you with his pedi- 
gree. 



T. p, There is no son of Mambrino Patchen 58 that 

is registered as Mason Chief. The stallion Mason 
Chief 6583 is by Hull 1239 (son of Belmont 64) ano 
his dam is Mag by Saturn 2605, second dam by Hugh 
Smith, a son of Sir Charles Mason Chief has no 
standard record. He was owned by Samuel D. Mason, 
Saegertown, Pa. We have no record of either The 
Baer Horse or Sconchin. 

BONNIE DIRECT AT STUD IN PLEASANTON. 

In the advertising columns of the Breeder and 
Sportsman this week Mr. Chas. L. Griffith of Pleasan- 
ton announces that his stallion, Bonnie Direct 2.05%, 
will make the season of 1906 at that place at (he 
same fee as last year— $100. Bonnie Direct was never 
looking better than he does at the present time and 
his popularity as a sire, although thoroughly estab- 
lished, Is certain to Increase every year. The oldest 
of his foals in 1905 were three years old, and just 
two of them were trained. One, the Ally Bonalet, 
won the three-year-old pacing division of the Ken- 
tucky Futurity and took the world's record for three- 
year-old pacing fillies In that race, her fastest heat 
being 2:09% and the other two 2:10% and 2:10%, 
proving her a great race Ally and dead game. The 
other three-year-old daughter of Bonnie Direct was 
Bonnie Me, a trotter, and while she got off decidedly 
and did not win, she trotted a trial mile in 2:11% and 
Is without doubt one of the fastest green trotters in 
California. Every one of the foals of Bonnie Direct 
that has been handled at all shows speed and race 
horse qualities. The time to breed to a great horse 
with the most profit is just before he reaches his 
greatest popularity, and if the opinions of the best 
posted trainers and horsemen are worth anything 
Bonnie Direct is destined to be one of the greatest 
sires of speed and one of the most popular stallions 
in California, so that the present year is the time to 
patronize him, as breeders who send their mares 
this year will have Bonnie Direct foals for sale when 
everybody wants them. 

That Bonnie Direct is producing a very high rate 
of speed and doing it uniformly is not in the least 
surprising. On his sire's side he comes from a line 
of champion race horses, being sired by the champion 
Direct 2:05'/ 2 , that was a son of the champion race 
horse Director 2:17. and he by the great Dictator, 
own brother to the mighty Dexter. The dam of 
Bonnie Direct is Bon Bon 2:26, dam also of Bonsilene 
2:14% and the magnificent stallion Bonnie Steinway 
that worked a mile in 2:11% last summer and will be 
raced this year. Bon Bon is by Simmons, one of 
the best sons of George Wilkes, and in Bonnie Direct 
are thus united two great race winning and record 
holding strains. Dictator and Geo Wilkes. The 
second dam of Bonnie Direct is Bonnie Wilkes 2:29% 
by George Wilkes, giving him another cross of Wilkes 
blood, while his third dam was by Bob Johnson, a 
son of the great Boston and his fourth dam a daugh- 
ter of .American Eclipse. As Direct had a cross of 
Boston blood in his veins through Jack Hawkins, 
sire of his second dam, it will be seen that Bonnie 
Direct gets two crosses each of the blood of the great- 
est American trotting ami running sires — George 
Wilkes and Boston. 

Mr. Griffith has recently leased 250 acres of fine 
rolling land just east of and adjoining Pleasanton 
and has fenced it into paddocks, erected new barns 
and sheds and made it an ideal place to care lor 
mares and their foals. He will have lots of green 
feed, and as the paddocks are all well watered stock 
should keep in fine condition. 

Those desirous of patronizing a high class stallion 
this year should correspond with Mr. Griffith and 
secure bookings at once. 

_ o 

Work horses are high. A New York brewery has 
just placed a $45,000 contract for 100 head of Perch- 
erons. 

Macon, Ga., has become a favorite wintering place 
for trotters and all the available stabling room at that 
place has been taken up. 



PAYMENTS IN OCCIDENT STAKES. 

Occident Stake of 1908. 

Sixty-six entries were made in the Occident 
Stake of 1908, which closed for entry of yearlings on 
January 1st, at $10 each The following made entries: 

John Arnett's blk. c. Sidney Wood by Sidney Ar- 
nett-Nellie. 

Geo. H. Bixby's b. c. Banquero by Neernut-Alice 
M cKinney. 

W. O. Bower's ch. f. Betty Direct by I Direct- 
Betsy B. 

I. I,. Borden's ch. f. Juliet B. by Monterey-Le Belle 

Altamont. 

I. L Borden's ch. c Belvoir by Monterey-Alice Bell. 

I. ].. Borden's b. f. Ramona by Prince Robert-Allle 

Cresco. 

Alex. Brown's br. c by Nushagak-Addie B. 

Alex. Brown's gr. c. by Nushagak-Serpolo. 

Alex. Brown's b. c. by Prince Ansel-Bonny Derby 

Alex. Brown's b. f. by Prince Ansel-Mayella B. 

La Siesta Ranch's b. c. Siesta by Iran Alto-Wanda. 

Martin Carter's ch. c, by Kinney Lou-Queen C. 

Martin Carter's b. c. by Directum II-Muriel P. 

Martin Carter's b. c. by Nutwood Wilkes-Bessie C. 

S. Christenson's b. f. by Stam B.-Perza. 

James Coffin's b. c. Mercury by Zombro-Ella J. 

James Coffin's br. f. Fritzi Scheff by Cassian-Carrie 
Malone. _ 

James Coffin's blk. f. Miss Ethel by Lecco-Rose Mc- 
Kinney. 

S. T. Coram's ch. f. Kesrina by Nutwood Wilkes- 
Petrina. 

Geo. A. Cressey's b. e. by Chas. Derby-Elsie. 
C. A Durfee's blk. c. Dr. Lecco by Lecco-Bessie D. 
W. G. Durfee's b. c. by Coronado-Lulu Wilkes. 
Byron Erkenbreeher's b. f. by Electro McKinney- 
Wilhelmina. 

Ernest A. Gammon's b. f. Cleo Dillon by Sidney 
Dillon-Cleo G. 

Henry Hahn's b. f. Alameda by Lecco-Henrietta. 

Fritz Hahn's blk. c. by Chas. Derby-Nellie Emoline. 

Ted Hayes' b. f. by Nutwood Wilkes-Ruth Mary. 

Mrs. L. J II. Hastings' br. c. California Boy by 
Coronado-Lady Gossiper. 

C. Z. Herbert's br. c. by Delphi-Altoonita. 

S. H. Hoy's b. f. Julia by Jules Verne-Beatrice 

W. H. Hoy's blk. c. Jules by Jules Verne-Camilla. 

.1. B. Iverson's b. c Ernest S. by Scott's McKin- 
ney-Amy I. 

J. B. Iverson's b. c. Star Light by Searchlight- 
Anita I. 

R. Jordan, Jr.'s b. c El Pronto by Stam B.-Con- 

stancia. 

J. A. Jones' blk. f. Sacajawea by Capt. Jones-Lady 

Beach. 

J. A Jones' blk. c. General Jones by Captain Jones- 
Daisy Q. Hill. 

J. A. Jones' blk. f. Alta Jones by Capt. Jones-Alta 
Norte. 

J. A. Jones' blk' c. by Capt. Jones-Amy May. 
E. C. Beyt's br. f. Sadie Seal by Red Seal by Scar- 
let Letter. 

Geo. A. Kelly's br. c. by Bonnie McK.-Vantrim 
T. F. Kiernan's ch. f. Dorothy Wilkeswood by Pa- 
checo W. -Daisy Nutwood. 

J. W. Marshall's b. C. Julius V. by Jules Verne- 
Sophia. 

W. S. Maben's blk. c. Admiral Togo by Petigru- 
Dixie W. 

H. W. Meek's b. or br. c. by Kinney Lou-Cricket. 

II. W. Meek's b. f. by Stam B.-Isabel 
S. U Mitchell's b. c by Peter J.-Elsi. 

I. C. Mosher's ch. c. Ocean Wave by Tidal Wave- 
Bessie L. 

R. C. McCormick's b. f. by Petigru-Julie Madison. 
K II. Perkins' br. c. Mirvin W. by Wayland W.- 
Miss Leah. 

G. W. Prescott's blk. c. Sun Lock by Zolock- 
Blondie. 

E. D. Roberts' b. c. Arrow Stanley by On Stanley- 
Bmallne. 

John H. Sanders' b c. John S. by Monterey-Zetta. 

John J. Sangster's ch. f. Miss Jennie by Mono- 
chrome-Jennie S. 

E. E. Sherwood's b. f. Daisy Z. by Zombro-Queen 
Woolsy. 

('has. K Silva's b. c. by Stam B.-Swift Bird. 

H. P. Smith's b. f. Finona McKinney by Montesol- 
Bessie Norfolk. 

G. E. Stickle's b. c. Ringgold by Stickle by Diablo. 

Sutherland & Chadbourne's ch. f Queen Ena by 
Lecco-Bertie. 

J. H. Torrey's br. f. Bessie T. by Zombro-Manilla. 

Valencia Stock Farm's br. c. by Direct Heir-La 
Belle. 

Valencia Stock Farm's b. f. by Direct Heir-Rose- 
drop. 

Valencia Stock Farm's blk. c. by Direct Heir-Glen- 

doveer. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b. c. by Athablo-Lustrine. 

Mrs. Chas. Whitehead's br f. Miss Delphi by Del- 
phi-The Mrs. 

R. P. Wilson's blk. c. Benton Boul by Peter J.-Lit- 
tle Dot. 

J. W. Zibbell's b. f by Tom Smith-Kate Lumry. 
Occident Stake of 1907. 

In the Occident Stake of 1907 second payment of 
$15 has been made on thirty-eight foals, now two 
years old. Those making second payment are the 

following: 

John Arnett's b. c. Chas. Schweizer by Sidney Ar- 
nett-Mlss Bruner. 

Thos. H Brent's b. f. Reina del Norte by Del 
Norte-Laurelia. 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow's br. f. Miss Allright by Greco- 
Maud J. 

Alex. Brown's b. f. Noeha by Nushagak-Pioche. 
Alex. Brown's b. f. The Bloom by Nushagak-Red- 
flower. 

Alex. Brown's b. c. Harold M. by Prince Ansel- 



Mamie Martin. 

W. O. Bowers' ch. c. W. O. B by Silver Bee-Sadie 
Benton. | , , i| ,j j 

Martin Carter's b. f. by Nutwood Wilkes-Bonny 
Derby. 

Christenson & Thompson's br. f. Beauty Patch by 
Bonnie Direct-Perza. 

W. G. Durfee's b. c. by Petigru-Ida Direct. 

W. G. Durfee's ch. f. by Petigru-Johanna Treat. 

W. G. Durfee's blk c. by Coronado-Ashwood. 

Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings' blk. f. Lady H. by Coro- 
nado-Lady Gossiper. 

Martin Carter's b. f. Stambla by Stam B -Mora Mae. 

Jas. E. Berryman's b. c Monte McKinney by Mon- 
terey-Dot McKinney. 

H. P. Smith's b. C. Monte Norfolk by Montesol- 
Bessie Norfolk. 

C L. Griffith's br. or hlk. f. by Bonnie Direct-Vic- 
toria S. 

E. A. Gammon's b. c. Ed Geers by Bayswater 
Wilkes-Urana. 

J. M. Hackett's blk. f. Silver Slipper by Suomi- 
Lottie H. 

E. P. Heald's blk. c. Tommy Murphy by Monte- 
rey-Honor. 

F. Hahn's blk. f. Gold Leaf by Chas. Derby-Nellie 
Emmoline. 

J. B. Iverson's b. c. Baron Wilhelm by Barondale- 
Wllhelmina II. 

T. F. Kiernan's ch. c. Guywood by Pacheco W.- 
Daisy Nutwood. 

La Siesta Ranch's b. c Mogolore by Iran Alto-Lady 
Belle Isle. 

M. L. Lusk's b. c. Zeloso by Zombro-Sallie Brooks. 
Mrs. C. F. Bunch's b f. Maytime by Stam B.-Elsie 
Downs. 

Thos. Smith's b. f. Marguerite Hunt by Nutwood 
Wilkes-Daisy S. 

S. Siljan's b. f. Martha H. by Iran Alto-Idabelle 

Dr. J. J. Summerfield's b. c. Lord Dillon by Sidney 
Dillon-Roblet. 

Valencia Stock Farm's b. c. Captain by Direct Heir- 
Rosedrop. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b. c. Gen. Nogi by Athablo-Cora 
Wickersham. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b. c. Soisette by Guy McKinney- 
Narcola. 

R. G White's blk. c. Gen. Nogi by Strathway-Snow 
Flake. 

Fred Wadham's b. c. Alone Hast'ngs by Petlgru- 
Juliet D. 

J. A. Jones' blk. c. Chehalem by Capt. Jones-Daisy 
Q. Hill. 

J A. Jones' blk. f. Chehalem Maid by Capt. Jones- 
Amy May. 

J. A. Jones' br. c. Admiral Togo by Capt. Jones- 
Maggie Caution 

L. H- Todhunter's b. c. by Zombro-The Silver Bell. 
Occident Stake of 1906. 

Third payment of $25 has been made on twenty- 
five colts and fillies entered in the Occident Stake for 
three-year-olds to be trotted at the California State 
Fair this year. Four of these three-year-olds are by 
Mi Kinney 2.11% and four by Sidney Dillon. Five are 
by sons of McKinney, Zombro 2:11 being represented 
by two, and Kinney Lou 2:07%, Guy McKinney and 
Montesol by one each. Nutwood Wilkes 2:16% is 
represented by two, while there is one each to the 
crdlt of ('has. Derby. Nushagak, Del Norte, L. W. 
Barondale, Sutter, and Stam B The list of those on 
Russell. Senator, Vesto, Baron Bretto, Barondale, 
Sutter, and Stam B. The list of those on which third 
payment has been made follows: 

J. N. Anderson's blk. f. Delia Derby by Chas. 
Derby -Nora D. 

Alex Brown's b. f. Kinocha by McKinney-Pioche. 

Alex Brown's b f. Red Blossom by Nushagak-Red- 
fiower. 

T. W. Barstow's br. c. Nearest McKinney by Mc- 
Kinney-Maud J. 

Thos. H. Brent's br. f. Magladi by Del Norte-Lau- 
relia. 

Geo. A Cressey's ch. c. by L. W. Russell -Elsie. 

Martin Carter's b. f. by Nutwood Wilkes-Lew G. 

T. J. Drais' b. c. Drais McKinney by Guy McKin- 
ney-Blanche Ward. 

Peter Fryatt's b. f Easter Maid by Senator- 
Maud B. 

Josie S. Frary's ch. c. Roy Dillon by Sidney Dillon- 
Lisette. 

M. G. Gill's br. c. Kinney G. by Linney Lou-Mat- 
tie G. 

T. F. Kiernan's ch. c. Vasnut by Vas to -Daisy Nut- 
wood. 

Win. Leech's b. f. Hiawatha by Baron Bretto-Sil- 
ver Bells. 

Geo. C. Need's b. c. Golden Baron by Barondale- 
Mary B. 

10. ('. Peart's b c. Electro by Sutter-Buchu. 

Thus. Smith's ch. c. Professor Heald by Nutwood 
Wilkes-Daisy S. 

Sutherland & Chadbourne's b. c. Sam G. by Stam 
B. -Bertie. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's ch. f Lottie Dillon by 
Sidney Dillon -Charlotta Wilkes. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's ch. c. Bravo Dillon by 
Sidney Dillon-Russie Russell. 

L. H. Todhunter's b. c. Silver Hunter by Zombro- 
The Silver Bell. 

L. H. Todhunter's b c. Gerald G. by Zombro- 
Itella. 

Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings' ch. c. Judge Dillon by Sid- 
ney Dillon-Eveleen. 

Vendome Stock Farm's b. c. Alto Kinney by Mc- 
Kinney-Irantilla 

Vendome Stock Farm's b. f. Mrs. Weller by Mc- 
Kinney-Much Better. 

Pat Foley's br. c. Major Montesol by Montesol- 
Lady Galindo. 

o— 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



January 13, 19. 6 



REVOLUTION IN ROAD MAKING. 



The Louisville & Nashville Railroad has recently 
issued for general free distribution a neat pamphlet 
embodying the split-log idea of road building and 
road repairing. No movement of the present day 
having for its object the material advancement of the 
agricultural resources and general prosperity of the 
country, holds so fair a promise of permanent and 
quick results as the "good roads movemertt. The 
need for good wagon roads in rural districts is il- 
lustrated by statistics which show that 99 per cent 
of all farm products must be carried over common 
roads to reach railroads That we have so long 
suffered from inferior roads is to be accounted for 
by the fact that the question of road improvement has 
not had a sufficient place in the public mind. This 
article shows that it is possible to have better roads 
without any, or at least but small, additional ex- 
pense. It deals exclusively with dirt roads, not be- 
cause of any belief that a good dirt road is equal to 
a macadam road, but because of the fact that a good 
dirt road is superior to a bad one; and the improve- 
ment of dirt roads will be a step in the right direc- 
tion Take care of the dirt roads and the macadam 
will come in time. It is usually the caso that the 
community that will not attempt to keep up a poor 
road will never keep up a good one. 

The split-log idea originated with D. Ward King 
He writes of it as follows: Col G. W. Waters, sec- 
letary of the Missouri Good Roads Association, said 
to me: 

"If the road commissioners of the state of Mis- 
souri could stand here and see what I see, the result 
would be worth a hundred thousand dollars a year to 
this commonwealth!" 

It is impossible to express in figures even the most 
general estimate of the value of such a revolution in 
road making as must result from the general use of 
this new and "absurdly simple" method. However, 
it is well to keep in mind the fact that in almost 
all states the mileage of common dirt roads is many 
times double that of macadamized, or other expensive 
loads intended to be permanent. 

In a state so long settled, so progressive and pros- 
perous as Ohio, for example, more than fifty per cent 
of the roads are of earth, and the interest shown 
by Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, New York and other 
Kastern states in the work of the split-log drag in- 
dicates that the dirt roads of these commonwealths 
still constitute a very imporant and perplexing ele- 
ment in the problem of transportation by team. Full 
ninety-nine per cent of the highways of Missouri and 
Iowa are earth roads, and a state official of Iowa once 
said to me that to have fiftene per cent of the main 
traveled roads of his state macadamized would be to 
lealize the most ambitious dreams of those men of 
Hie state especially interested in improving the con- 
dition of its highways. 

My interests demanded frequent travel over the 
road between my farmhouse and the village, and I al- 
ways lelt it keen resentment when bad roads made it 
difficult or Impossible to drive to town— a state of 
things that was altogether too frequent 

A little investigation and experience demonstrated 
to me that this was by no means the result of indif- 
ference or inactivity on the part of our road com- 
missioners. Then I reached the conviction that it 
was the fate of the farmer to spend $1500 to $3000 a 
mile for macadamized road or else travel in the mud 
in all periods of continued wet weather— which is to 
say a very large proportion of the year. This con- 
viction is almost universal among farmers who have 
really wrestled with the road problem and know from 
experience its difficulties. 

However, this state of doubt and discouragement 
did not long continue, and I began to investigate and 
experiment in an irregular sort of a way. Acting 
under the persistent impulse to experiment, I one 
day hitched my team to a drag made of a frost- 
spoiled wooden pump stock and an old post, held 
parallel to each other by three pieces of fence boards 
about three feet long. Smooth wire served in place 
of a chain, and a strip of plank laid between the 
post and the pump stock gave me a rough platform 
upon which to stand. 

The horses were attached at such a point of the 
wire as to give the drag a slant of about forty-five 
degrees in the direction required to force the earth 
that it would gather from the side of the road up into 
the center. We had just had a soaking rain, and 
the earth was in a plastic condition I had driven 
this drag but a few rods when I was fully aware 
that it was serving at least the initial purpose for 
which it was intended— that of leveling down the 
wheel rut and pushing the surface dirt into the 
center of the road. 

At my neighbor's gate, toward town, I turned 
around and took the other side of the road back to 
my home. The result was simply astonishing. More 
rain fell upon this road, but it "ran off like water 
from a duck's back." From that time forward, after 
every rain or wet spell, I dragged the half mile of the 
road covered by my original experiment. 

At the end of three months the road was better 
than when it had been dragged for three weeks, and 
at the end of three years it was immensely improved 
over its condition at the end of the first year's work. 
I studied the result of each step in my experiment, 
and finally learned that three elements are required 
to make a perfect earth road, and that the lack of one 
of them is fatal to the result. To be perfect, an earth 
road must be at one and the same time oval, hard 
and smooth All of these indispensables are acquired 
by the use of the split-log drag in any soil that I 
have ever come in contact with — and I have worked 
in the various kinds of clay soil, in the gumbo of the 
swampy lowlands, and in the black mud of the prai- 
ries. 

Observation of my experiment taught me that two 



weeks of rain would not put this bit of road in bad 
condition at a time when the highway at either end of 
it was impassable for a wagon. Of course, it was 
plain that the reason the road was not bad was 
that there was no mud in it. Hut why mud would 
not collect in it was not clear to me until I was 
taught my lesson by the very humble means of the 
hog wallow. One day I chanced to notice that water 
was standing in one of these wallows long after the 
ground about it had become dry. Probably I had 
many times before observed this fact, but not until 
now had it occurred to me to inquire into its cause. 
Examining the edges of the wallow, I was impressed 
with the fact that it was almost as hard as a piece 
of earthenware Clearly this was because the wal- 
lowing of the hogs had mixed or "puddled" the earth 
and the water together, forming a kind of cement 
which dried into a hard and practically waterproof 
surface. 

The next important lesson in my understanding of 
the real elements of road-making was taught me by 
studying what we farmers call a "spouty spot" in 
the side of a clay hill. All who live in a clay coun- 
try know the unspeakable stickiness of one of these 
spouty places, and are familiar with the fact that 
after ten days or two weeks of bright, hot sunshine, 
you can take an ax and break from one of these spots 
a clod so hard that with it you can almost drive a 
tenpenny nail into a pine plank. Naturally, it oc- 
curred to me that if this .puddled clay soil would stay 
hard for three months when left in a rough condi- 
tion, it would surely stay longer if moulded into the 
form of a smooth roof, so that the water which 
fell upon it would easily run off. 

This original half-mile of road was dragged stead- 
ily for four years before I had a single active re- 
cruit in my new crusade. At first my neighbors poked 
good-natured fun at me, probably because the thing 
was so new and so absurdly simple — and, perhaps, 
also, because I did the work without pay or any 
expectation of it. 

From the outset of this work, so many questions 
have been poured in upon me indicating points con- 
cerning which the public is prone to go astray in its 
understanding of how to build and use the split-log 
drag that I have prepared the following road-drag- 
ging "catchism" as covering, with fair completeness, 
the main working facts in the problem: 

Would it not be better to plow the road before 
dragging? 

No. Plowing gives a soft foundation Plowing the 
middle of the road is a relic of the old dump-scraper 
days. 

What do you do when there are deep ruts in the 
road? 

Drag them. If you drag when the surface is quite 
loose and soft, you will be surprised how soon the 
ruts disappear. 

How do you get the dirt to the middle of the road? 
By hauling the drag slantwise with the end that is 
toward the center of the road a little to the rear of 
the other end. 

But suppose the road is too narrow? 
First drag the wheel tracks. After three or four 
rains or wet spells plow a shallow furrow just outside 
the dragged pait. Spread this over the road with 
a drag. Only plow one furrow. You may plow an- 
other furrow after the next rain. At each plowing 
you widen the roadbed two feet. 
How many horses do you use? 

Two, generally; three if it is just as handy; four 
when breaking colts — a good solid team in the cen- 
ter and a colt on each side; two men on the drag — 
one to drive, the other to control the colts. 
How do you drain the road? 

If the earth is pushed to the middle of the road 
continually, the road will drain itself. 
Why not make the drag out of plank? 
You can, and do good work. But the split log is 
best. The plank drag is not so-stiff. 

Why not make the drag of heavy sawed timber? 
Because drags so made have a tendency to slip over 
the bumps 

Don't you grade up the road first? 
No. The grading is done with the drag, gradually. 
By so doing, the road is solid all the time and is built 
on a solid foundation. 

What does it cost to drag a mile of road a year? 
The cost is variously estimated at from one to three 
dollars. 

How do you keep the drag from dodging around 
sidewise? 

By not loading it too heavily. If a drag dodges 
around the earth you are moving, it is because it is 
overloaded. 

Will the dragged road stand heavy hauling? 
Yes and no. A dragged road will stand more 
heavy hauling than an undragged road, but not so 
much as a macadamized or well-kept gravel road. 
Will a drag help a sand road? 

A sand road is a very different proposition from 
the black soil, clay or gumbo An entirely different 
method must be adopted. Three things may be done 
to a sand road to make it better. First, keep it wet; 
second, haul clay to it; third, sprinkle it with crude 
oil, as they do in California and in some parts of 
Southern Kansas and Texas. The drag will be bene- 
ficial in keeping the sand road perfectly flat so that 
it will absorb moisture and retain il a long time. 

To this catechism I would add the following 
"Don'ts:" Don't drive too fast. Don't walk; get on 
the drag and ride. Don't be particular about ma- 
terial; almost any log will do. Don't try to drag with 
only one piece; use two. 

The Matinee Club of Pittsburg is one of the 
strongest in the United States, and Pittsburg is today 
one of the best horse towns in this country. 
o 



NEWS FROM THE NORTH. 

(Portland Rural Spirit. Jan. 5.) 

Senator Helman and wife left here last Saturday 
for their former home in San Jose, Cal. The Senator 
will be located at Pleasanton, where he has a stable of 
horses in training, including Mack Mack 2:12%, which 
he intends to race East this year. The Senator ship- 
ped down from here three of the best youngsters in 
the State, all sired by Capt Jones as follows: Ver- 
non Jones, junior champion at the Lewis and Clark 
fair; Chehalem reserve junior champion, and Che- 
halem Maid, second prize winner in yearling filly 
class. The get of Capt. Jones are attracting a great 
deal of attention now and they are fast coming to the 
front as speed prospects. 

W. B. Linn, local agent for J. Crouch & Son, nas 
on the way from the Lafayette farm twelve head of 
Imported stallions for this market. The shipment con- 
sists of four Belgians, four Percherons and four Ger- 
man Coach. These stallions were selected espec ially 
for this market and are the best in their class. 



It is reported that Tom Talbot has sold his good 
green trotters Ounita by Phallamont Hoy. out of 
Beulah to Jasper Reeves. 



R. H. Jenkins on J. H. Bennett won the paper 
chase of the Portland Hunt Club New Years day 
hands down. E. B. Tongue on Oregon Kid was sec- 
ond. 



Dr. J. D. Shaw has purchased a tine three-year-old 
Zombro filly that he is having wintered at the fair 
grounds and is a promising one for next year. 

Aug. Erickson has registered his fine colt by Search- 
light 2:03V4, out of Altalena (the dam of speedy 
Sunny Jim) by AHarriont, as The Archlight," No. 
42291. 



J. A Jones has sold to Henry Helman the second 
prize yearling filly, Chehalem Maid, at the Lewis and 
Clark fair. She is by Capt. Jones, dam Amy May by 
Alexis 2: IS. Second dam Beulah by Altamont; third 
dam Tecora by C. M. Clay 22, etc. 



William Clark of Medford writes he has sold the 
three-year-old black filly, Fair Maid, to Archie Mc- 
Gill Of Medford. an old time race horseman, for $350. 
Fair Maid is by Tybault, dam Yreka, by Mt Vernon 
by Nutwood; second dam by Director. 



J. Crouch & Son of Lafayette, Ind., through their 
agent here, W. B. Linn, purchased this week from J. 
A. Jones of Springbrook, Ore., the good two-year-old 
colt Vernon Jones by Capt Jones, dam May Belle 
Vernon (dam of Col. Mayberry. trial 2:16) by Mt. 
Vernon, son of Nutwood, etc. Verrion Jones is with- 
out question the best individual in the state and 
was pronounced by the judge in the Lewis and Clark 
show ring as being one of the best two-year-olds he 
ever saw. Vernon Jones, together with the full broth- 
er to his sire, Kinney Me., will be shipped to Lafay- 
ette, Ind., their future home. 



Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet. 



The directors of the Walla Walla Fair Association, 
under a called meeting, elected a new board of di- 
rectors a few weeks ago, and since their induction into 
office have gone to work with a determination of 
putting the affairs of the association on a good sound 
footing- 
Mr. William Hogoboom, the veteran trainer and 
driver, is still one of us, with his son, Elmer, the boy 
with the best disposition in the county, his assistant, 
and some of the wise ones say Elmer can give the 
"old man" pointers. Billy don't talk very much 
about what he has that is good in the winter time, 
but I am going to say this much lor him, that he has 
a great horse in Caution by Electioneer. This horse 
is the greatest broodmare sire thai this country has 
ever seen. Remember that he is tin' sire of the dam 
of Helen Norte 2.09V4, trotting, this year. She was 
only beaten a neck the other day by John Caldwell 
in 2:08^ at Los Angeles, Cal. Billy is also training 
a few colts by his young stallion Teddy by Diablo. 
Strange to say a few of these colts show fast at the 
trot; they all have good legs and in conformation are 
beauties. 

GOOD BECAUSE IT DOES GOOD. 

That is the brief hut significant comment made in a 
recent testimonial about Kendall's Spavin Cure, 'I'll" 
writer of It put much In little. He express,,! no new- 
ideas; he did not concern himself with the way, the 

how. or the why, hut in expressive form the groal fai t 
that is testified to by so many thousands of people, 
namely: Thai Kendall's Spavin Cure is the standard 
dependable remedy for the commonest ailments ot 
horses. , 
The common ailments of horses are not many. But 
while few. thev are liable to come at any lime. The best 
kept horses aiid the ones with least cure are alike suh- 
ject to these common ailments, among which might be 
mentioned spavins, ring-bone, lameness, splints and 
curbs It is a happv circumstance that these ailments 
on all horse llesh, no matter in what country, require 
no variation in the treatment. And It is also a happy 

circumstance for horse owners that they may nave 

always at hand so Inexpensive and so dependable a 
remedy for just these characteristic ailments as is 
Kendall's Spavin Cure. Even Hie most stubborn eases 
Yield to it. It is worthy of note that everyone who lias 
ever used it commends It.- At any rale, we have yet to 
hear of a user In all the years Kendall's Spavin ( ure 
has been in use who will contend that it is not all it is 
represented to be. It is to be had at any drug store 
and we certainly think horse owners who do not have 
il alwavs on hand ready for lameness, or any other 
emergency that may come, are not consulting their own 
best interests. 

— o 

Strike— If they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 
when you ask for It. 



8 



[January 13, 19C6 



1 ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 1 

Conducted by J. X. D< WITT. 



COMING EVENTS. 
Rod. 

Jan. 1-tune I —Closed season for black bam 

April l-Sepi. lo. O' t. Itt-Feb. I— Open season for lading n:c3:- 
b iad In tidewater. 

Sept. I0-Oct 16 -Close season In tidewater for steelhead. 

Sept. I0-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 

Sept. I5-April I — Open season for louslei-x am) crawnub 

Oct. 16-Nov. lb - Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. 1- April I— Trout season closed. 

Nov. l-Aprll I— Closed season for taking steelhead above the 
water. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
v iter. 

Gun. 

July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

Sept. I-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 

age hen. 

Oct. I5-Feb. 15— Open season Tor quail, ducks, etc. 

Oct 15-Aprll I— Open season for English snipe. 

Oct I5-Aug I— Deer season closed. 

Bench Shows. 

Jan. 4. 6-SauthemOhto Kennel Club. Hamilton. O. 

Jan 10, II — Bay State Co-operative Bench Snow Association. 
Fall River. Mass. Walter K. Stone, Clerk 

Jan. 17. 20— Cincinnati Kenael Association. Cincinnati, O. 
John C. Schomaker, Secretary. 

Feb. 14. 15— Westminster Kennel Club New York. Robt. V. 
McKlm. Secretary. 

Feb. 20. 83— New England Kennel Club Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. Entries close Jan 20 

Feh 28-March 3— Washington Kennel Club. Washington, Pa. 
F. C. Tnomas. Secretary. 

March 7. 10-Duquesne Kennel Club Pittsburfc, Pa. F. S 
Steadman Secretary 

March 13, 16-Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N. Y. S P. White, 
Secretary. 

March 14. 17— Passaic County Fi-h and Game Protective Asso- 
ciation. Paterson, N. J. Jas Matthews, Secretary. 

Marco 21, 24- Wolverine Ktncel Club. Detroit. Mich. K. G, 
Smith, Seoretary. 

Mav 29, 30-Long Island Kennel Club. Jj<. M. Dale, Secretary. 

June 1 8— Lidles Kennel Association of Mass. Mrs. L. M. 
Speed. Secretary. 

June 9— Wlssahlckon Kennel Club. Wisfahickon, Pa J. Ser- 
geant Price. Secretary 

S-pt. 3 fi -Taunton Kennel Club. Taunton, Mass. A.J.Lee 
Secretary. 

Sept. 8— CeJarhurst Kennel Club Cedarhurst, L I. Jno G. 
Bates, Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Jan 8— Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, 23d annual trials. 
:..--.■-[)-;: Cal. Albert Betz, Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg.. San 
Francisco. 

Jan 8-Teias Field Trial Club. 4th annual trials. Kansas 
City, Tex. 

Jan. 9-Georgla Fie'd Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
Waynesboro, Ga. P. M. Esi-ig. Secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 

Jan 15-United States Field Trial Club. 17th annual trials. 
Grand Junction, Tenn. W. B Stafford, Secretary. 

Jaa National Championship Field Trial Club 10 b annual 

trials Followln: U. S All Age Stake. W. U Stafford, Secre- 
tary, Trenton, Tenn. 

BEARS IN THE YELLOWSTONE PARK. 

"I would advise you not to go into the woods." 
said a corporal of cavalry to a ruddy faced English- 
man who was about to explore a piece of heavily 
timbered forest just back of the Lake Hotel in the 
Yellowstone Park. A party had just arrived from 
the Old Faithful Inn in which were this venturesome 
subject of King Edward and the writer. 

"What's the 'arm'.'" he asked in some surprise. 

"There are two bear colonies not far from the 
edge of the clearing, and they might make it unpleas- 
ant for you if you happened to get too near them," 
replied the corporal. 

"Really? "Ow exciting! Shall we 'ave a shot at 
them before leaving?" and the visitor from the other 
side called attention to a 7x9 kodak that swung from 
his left shoulder. 

"No trouble about that." replied Uncle Sam's 
guardian. "Be at the dump near sunset and you'll 
catch a herd of them." 

The eyes of the Englishman snapped with delight 
as he carefully inspected his picture taking plant to 
assure himself that it was in good working order. 

Next to the thermic displays and the canyon of 
the Yellowstone come the bears, in point of interest, 
to nine-tenths of the visitors to the park. Immedi- 
ately after registering the visitor asks if there are 
any bears in the neighborhood. He has seen speci- 
mens of these animals in menageries and zoological 
gardens, yet he has an intense interest to have a 
look at Bruin in his native environment. If told 
that the legion about the hotel is numerously In- 
habited by bears he overruns with delight and be- 
comes impatient to see them. Not less interested 
are the women. 

Perhaps the finest exhibition of these wild beasts 
is given at the Lake Hotel. They are to be seen at 
the Canyon Hotel and at other points in the park, 
but the greatest variety and the largest number visit 
the region contiguous to the first named location. It 
is their custom to come out of the pine woods and 
thf thickets twice a day, their first appearance beln^ 
soon after sunrise and the second half an hour before 
sunset. 

Six hundred feet back of the Lake Hotel is a clear- 
ing of about a dozen acres, in the center of which 
is a dump, a place where all the refuse from the 
kitchen and the tables is deposited. It is taken away 
once each day, a tip cart being used for the purpose. 
Before the load is started every guest at the hotel 
is on the show ground. Kodaks and field glasses are 



numerous. Owners of the former are desirous of 
taking away indusputable evidence of their near asso- 
ciation with the wild beasts of the park in order to 
give a thrilling llavor to their experiences when re- 
cited to friends at home. It establishes the fact that 
the taker of the picture saw a number of real live 
bears, and that he or she, In order to get the snap 
shot, must have been in their near vicinity. 

After Bruin's evening meal has been loaded into 
the tip cart its coming is impatiently waited by the 
assembled guests. The driver starts his horse on 
an easy trot, and the load is rattled out to the dump. 
The clatter has been heard by the shaggy denizens 
of the forest, and before the cart has been emptied 
they may be seen slowly emerging from the shadowy 
depths of the great trees and the clumps of bushes 
to the tight and to the left of the open space. 

"There they come!" whisper the excited and in- 
terested spectators, as with straining eyes they be- 
hold the handsome beasts come into the clearing. 
Their movements are slow and graceful, and occa- 
sionally they lift their heads and look from right 
to left as if inspecting the semi-circular line of in- 
vaders of their domain. Seated with the tourists are 
always two cavalrymen, with revolvers loaded and 
ready for use in case the animals should take it into 
their heads to attack the curious crowd. 

The bolder of the animals come straight to their 
meal, and the more timid ones can be. seen poking 
their heads out from behind the trees and the bushes. 
Those first at the banquet begin operations without 
the loss of time, and the fact that they have the 
pick of all the "good things" makes them a little 
particular as to what they shall select. 

The first movement is an inspection of what has 
been offered. Their great, broad forepaws are em- 
ployed to reveal the various ingredients of the con- 
glomerate mass, and carefully they turn it over and 
over until they discover some toothsome morsel, 
which is pulled out by their sharp claws and con- 
veyed to their mouths. While in the act of mastica- 
tion they ease their bodies upon their hindquarters, 
and, with every evidence of supreme satisfaction, 
leisurely dispose of the tidbit. 

The first comers on the occasion in question were 
three with coats of glossy black and all were of 
enormous size. Shortly after their appearance came 
one with a coat of brown. He also was of mammoth 
proportions. After this quartet had feasted for ten 
minutes they appear disturbed by a noise that 
came out of the woods over to the left of the clearing. 
All suspended operations and turned their heads in 
the direction from whence came the sound. 

Presently there came into view a profession of five 
silver tips, the handsomest specimens of the bear 
species to be found in the park. Leading the line was 
an enormous female, with two beautiful cubs, one on 
each side of their ponderous mother. In this latter 
exhibition the spectators became deeply interested, 
and gave frequent vent to their delight. The ladies 
said: "Look at those dear little things." while the men, 
with more robustness, exclaimed, 'By George, are 
they not dandies?" 

The so-called silver tip has a mixture of gray in his 
coat and a line, nearly white, running the entire 
length of his back, whi!e his head is decidedly gray. 
The group in question was sleek, and gave evidence 
of having been well fed. They were in possession of 
all their activities and natural beauties, which were 
in strong contradistinction to the kind that live in 
captivity. 

When this last aggregation reached the scene of 
the banquet the first comers turned about and re- 
treated slowly to the edge of the woods. This was 
interpreted as meaning that differences existed be- 
tween the colonies, and that in a test of strength the 
silver tips had shown themselves superior to both 
the blacks and the browns. The cubs were given the 
right to go where they pleased, and in their wander- 
ings found many a tender morsel that was just to 
their liking. The old fellow.-- who had fallen back 
showed that they did not intend to return, as they 
finally disappeared in the deepening shadows of the 
forest. 

After the silver tips had been feeding for fifteen 
minutes or more, the mother of the cubs, either from 
some movement that she interpreted as threatening 
danger to her offspring or from annoyance at seeing 
so many strangers present made a sudden dash at 
the left wing of the circle. The stampede that fol- 
lowed defies description. 

Skirts fluttered and female voices screamed at their 
top notch. All of the men became panic-stricken, and 
hurried as fast as their legs could carry them toward 
the hotel. One of the sterner sex, evidently blinded 
with fear, ran against a small pine tree and fell 
senseless from the contact. Worst of all, the two 
cavalrymen, who were supposed to be present for 
the protection of the guests, joined in the retreat. 
It was afterward explained in extenuation of their 
action that their revolvers were not loaded on this 
particular occasion. 

A report followed the tourists the next day that the 
pugnacious old beast had been killed when next she 
came to the dump to appease her hunger. 

Many stories have been told about the cunning 
tricks played by the bears at the Lake Hotel. Some 
of these are highly flavored with imagination and 
others may be set down as pure fiction; but there was 
an incident which occurred on the night the writer 



was at the hotel that gives substantial evidence that 
bruin is possessed of no little perspicacity and down- 
right cleverness. 

A display of these qualities was brought out by the 
arrival of a box of hams at the hotel, after dark, the 
hour being so late that it was decided not to place 
them in the storage-room until morning. This was 
an oversight, as, when the box was seen the next 
day, it was found to have been ripped open during 
the night and i.s contents more or less disturbed. 
Two of the hams, partly consumed, were picked up 
near the splintered top. while a census of the con- 
signment showed that five others had disappeared 
entirely. 

The question arose as to how the purloiners had 
managed to carry off their spoils, but this was later 
explained by cne who was acquainted with the tricks 
and the habits of these sagacious beasts. He affirmed 
that after the hams had been released the shaggy 
thieves had taken a prize under each forepaw, and. 
rising upon their hind legs, had walked off with the 
smoked viand. Even a weak imagination could picture 
the humor of this scene, and the fact that the inti- 
denl was frequently referred to during the remainder 
of the journey showed that the grotesqueness of the 
situation had made a deep impression. 

There is another colony of bears in the wooded hills 
back of the Canyon Hotel, and they exhibit exactly 
the same characteristics as do those at the Lake 
Hotel. They come down a rather steep incline to the 
feeding ground, which is in a slight depression and 
affords an excellent opportunity for seeing the bears 
when at their meals. 

1 — o 

WONDERFUL COURAGE OF A MOOSE COW. 

One of the most remarkable moose hunts ever re- 
ported terminated last fall at Talbot Station, on the 
line cf the Quebec and Lake'St. John railway, about 
sixty-five miles north of this city. 

P, McCall and J. Carter of Grand Mere d scovered 
a bull moose recently, after following his tracks for a 
considerable distance. Then they saw that he was 
accompanied by a female almost as large as himself 

Often, before getting within good safe rifie shot of 
the bull the hunters could have easily killeJ the cow. 
It would almost have seemed that she was aware of 
the fact that she was protected by the law Oi" the land, 
which imposes a fine of $100 upon anyone k.lling a 
female moose, so dangerously close did she remain 
to the hunters and so constantly did she harass them 
during the chase. 

After following the pair for a considerable distance 
the hunters succeeded in placing a bullet in the body 
of the bull, but without striking any vital part of 
the animal's anatomy, though for some time his course 
was marked by a stream of blood. Probably because 
he was not alone, but had the safety of his mate to 
consider, as well , as his own, or it may be because 
he did not care to face two assailants at the same 
time, the wounded moose did not turn upon his foes, 
as so many of these animals do when wounded at 
close quarters. * 

Both moose made off at first at a very rapid rate, 
but finally came upon a locality where the snow was 
so deep that their course was greatly impeded. The 
hunters found no difficulty whatever in following the 
two moose, but whenever they approached them tnt 
cow, as if fully understanding the wounded condition 
of her mate, would turn upon the hunters and keep 
them at a safe distance until the weakened bull had 
been able to gain another start. She simply stood 
in their path and barred the way. 

This happened not once or twice, but was several 
times repeated. Many miles were covered in this 
manner, the chase lasting all day. 

At nightfall, when the hunters were no longer able 
to maintain it for want of ability to follow the trail 
in the dark, they were obliged to camp out in the 
open air. Fearing to make a fire lest the moose should 
be driven away, the hunters suffered so much from 
the extreme cold that they had but little sleep, and 
had to keep moving about to maintain circulation. 

As soon as the first glimmer of daylight enabled 
them to see the tracks of the moose they were off 
again in hot pursuit. At one time the trail led them 
across the Batiscan river, but they were fortunate 
enough to pick it up again near the opposite shore, 
and shortly before nightfall on the following day they 
had the satisfaction of having their persistency re- 
warded by a glimpse of the animals still traveling 
together, the bull evidently very much exhausted from 
loss of blood. 

As they lessened the distance between them and 
their quarry the plucky cow again placed herself in 
the breach to save her lord and master. The hunters 
separated so that the cow could not cover the fire 
from both of them, and one more shot brought the 
handsomely antlered moose lifeless to the ground. 

Then, and not till then, did the courageous survivor 
of the pair plunge into the woods and beat a hasty 
retreat. • The hunters estimate that the moose must 
have led a chase of at least from thirty to forty miles. 

A meeting of the active spirits who have been en- 
gaged for some time past in the formation of a club, 
the object of which is to provide its membership with 
facilities for hunting bear in the high Sierra Nevada 
mountains, was held at Hanford recently. At that 
time preliminary steps were taken to perfect perma- 
nent organization A committee was appointed to 
draft the necessary constitution and by-laws. Cap- 
tain Brown left for Plumas county to perfect ar- 
rangements for holding club bear hunts in the future. 
The cdub already has excellent preserves in Plumas 
county and surrounding country. The membership 
will embrace a number of San Francisco sportsmen, 
who will co-operate with the Nevada and Northern 
California members of the club in making the hunting 
meets of the members notable in the annals of sport- 
ing events in the United States. 



January 13, li)( 6] 



THE SCENTING POWERS OF SPORTING DOGS. 

Occasionally, apparently In the most inexplicable 
way, a dog seems to lose the greater part of its 
smelling powers, and without searching further those 
In charge at once say that scent is bad. ascribing the 
cause to some mysterious state of the ground, its 
dryness, soaked state, etc. And thus they are con- 
tent to leave the matter. It Is an undoubted fact that 
the scent of game does appear to lie better on a 
warm, light soil than on a cold, clay one, and if the 
latter becomes dry scent is sure to be very faint in- 
deed. Why this should be is hard to explain, but the 
truth of it cannot be denieJ Those who are about 
to purchase Retrievers, Pointers or Setters should 
profit by this knowledge and always endeavor to pro- 
cure such dogs from a district noted for its heavy soil. 
These animals have been accustomed to dealing with 
a much fainter scent, and consequently succeed splen- 
didly when transferred to a district noted for its warm, 
light staple. To obtain dogs from a light soil and 
expect them to work as well en clay as animals ac- 
customed to it is utter folly, and hound to end in 
disappointment. They may get used to the fainter 
scent in time, but during that period are likely to 
be condemned as more or less useless. Therefore it 
is wise to make an effort to procure all sporting dogs 
for use with the gun from a locality known to pos- 
sess a heavy soil. 

Even with the cleverest of dogs, and under the 
most favorable conditions, the mystery of a sudden 
failing of scent is hard to fathom, and as this is a 
puzzle which perplexes many sportsmen during every 
shooting season it Is proposed to offer a few explana- 
tions which may be of assistance in salving the secret. 

The nostrils of a dog are very delicate organs, 
and this is especially the case with reference to dogs 
kept in a total or partial state of domesticat on. It 
is probable, from what we hear, that the smellin? 
powers of wolves and dingoes, which are asserted to 
be the wild congeners of our present dogs, never de- 
teriorate, and they always seem able to hunt and run 
down their prey by scent. If this is the case it is 
only reasonable to suppose that a lack of usual scent- 
ing powers in our dogs is in some degree attributable 
to the conditions under which they live And it can 
be proved easily that this is actually the case. 

I should be the last to decry the use of disinfectants 
in kennels, for the employment of one or other of 
these well known preparations is often the only mean;; 
of keeping such places healthy and in a proper sani- 
tary state; but they should be used with due discre- 
tion. Too often a kennelman will scatter a disin- 
fectant freely for the sole purpose of concealing un- 
pleasant evidence of his own negllect, and where this 
occurs he should be at once forbidden to use it at all. 
A disinfectant should be employed to assist cleanli- 
ness, and not as an apology for it. The knowledge 
that all bad smells may be drowned by the free use 
of powerful disinfectant often causes a kennelman to 
be neglectful of removing the cause of those smells. 

It is the usual thing to cleanse kennels early in the 
morning, and immediately operations are complete to 
sprinkle every part liberally with disinfectant. The 
result is the place is reeking with the smell of this 
disinfectant for several hours. This all-pervading 
odor has serious effect on the olfactory senses of the 
dogs, and when they leave the kennel to work a little 
later their noses for a time are absolutely useles-. 
This is the true explanation of the reason dogs often 
work very badly during the early part of the day and 
afterward perform more brilliantly; although the ordi- 
nary doggy man will tell one that the improvement 
is owing to the ground getting warmer. It is perfectly 
correct to clean out a kennel as early as possible in 
the day, but a disinfectant should not be used directly 
afterward till it is known whether the dogs will be 
required. Should they be wanted a little later defer 
the disinfecting till they have left the kennel, for its 
effects will have disappeared by the time the dogs 
return, and if the services of the animals are not 
needed use the disinfectant sparingly Personally, I 
prefer to see it used for Hushing the drains of ken- 
nels only. 

A dirty kennel impregnated with filth and bad 
smells acts just as harmfully on a dog's olfactory [low- 
ers as a place reeking with the smell of a strong 
disinfectant. For this reason a kennel should be main- 
tained in as cleanly a state as possible. 

There are other reasons besides these already ex- 
plained for a dog's nose being at fault. Scent is gen- 
erally expected to be very faint on a dry soil — that 
is, a harsh, dry soil — and this fact admits of easy 
explanation. As the dog progresses over the surface 
of the ground a certain amount of dust is raised, and 
it is this which interferes with the animal's nose. 
No dog can work accurately when dust is Hying, as 
Norfolk keepers, who have had experience in the dust 
storms so often blowing on the light lands of that 
county, will be able to testify. 

Another thing which seriously handicaps a Retriever 
especially is the smell of (lowers. Such a dog may be 
seen to follow a running partridge beaut'fully to a 
fence, and then be at an utter loss owiirg to the bot- 
tom of that fence being a mass of flowers. Pointers 
and Setters may also be observed in like difficulty 
in a field of seeding clover, which is always a mass 
of flowers during September It is never safe to trust 
to the dogs having found every head of game in such 
a crop, as a careful atrd close walk through after they 
have passed over it will often prove. The same re- 
marks apply to dogs working irr heather, although 
they are not often at serious fault iir this except on 
very dry days, when the pollen is flying freely in the 
air. 

Dressings of manure upon land also greatly handi- 
cap dogs, although game is not fond of resorting to 
fields recently treated, urrless it be partridges seeking 
food in winter. I have noticed that superphosphate 
of lime, which is about tlr> strongest smelling of all 



artificial manures, is one cf the worst for affecting 
dogs. The smell seems to 1 nger on the ground for 
weeks after the manure has been distributed thai 
length of time, aird is lest to human detection, and 
directly dogs get upon an area treated with it they 
are at fault. 

The extreme variation so o.ten remarked in the 
scent left by tunning birds is somet mes attributable 
to the extent of their injuries. It stands to reason 
that a bird badly wounded leaves a stronger scent 
behind than one which is only slightly hurt; and the 
speed with which a dog follows feme of its game and 
the certainty with which it stic ks to the trail are fre- 
quently explained by the fact that a spot of blood 
is left on he ground hire and here. 

A tiled Retriever can never follow game with ac- 
curacy, for' a little exercise sets it panting badly, an 1 
then the animal is not making proper use of its nose. 
Should it be breath ng heavily through the mouth 
to cool itself and get its wind, only an occasional 
sniff takes place through the nose, and this is hardly 
sufficient to form a correct guide. Some people assert 
that dogs, especially Pointers and Setters, can taste 
the scent on the air, but this is open to doubt 

Readers will be able to gather from this that there 
are other reasons for the failure of a dog's scenting 
powers thair the state of the atmosphere and condi- 
tion of the soil. Generally a little research will solve 
the mystery, and in the majority of cases it will be 
discovered that the dog itself is not to blame. — Dalton, 
o 

COMMENDABLE ACTION OF THE PACIFIC AD- 
VISORY COMMITTEE. 

At a meeting of the Pacific Advisory Committee on 
the 2nd inst., a resolut.on was adopted annulling the 
disqualification of a number of nor thern fanciers. The 
right course was adopted as has been the general 
belief would be followed, for eradicating the last 
smoulder ing sparks of jurisdictional antagonism. Sec- 
retary Norman states: "It is believed that an end 
has now been achieved to all disension in kennel mat- 
ters on the Coast, and this committee congratulates 
the members of the Amer ican Kennel Club in its juris- 
diction on the unprecedented prospects for a harmo- 
nious and successful show season " 

The resolution adopted is the following: 

"Pacific Advisory Committee of the American Ken- 
nel Club, January 2nd. 1906. 

When as. all organizations other than the Ameri- 
can Kennel Club claiming jurisdiction in kennel mat- 
ters on the Pacific Coast have ceased to exist by rea- 
son of the action of the officers and members of the 
Seattle Kennel Club and of the Western Kennel 
League in applying for membership in the Seattle 
Dcg Fanciers' Association, a member of the Ameri- 
can Kennel Club, and the r eons:equ?nt election to 
membership therein, ami 

Whereas, such action marks the end of dissension 
cn the Pacific Coast in matters affecting kennel in- 
terests, and 

Whereas, the Seattle Dog Fanciers' Association has 
petitioned this committee for the reinstatement of 
all individuals disqualified for participation in shows 
held on the Pacific Coast under rules other than 
those of the American Kennel Club; therefore be it 

Resolved, That this committee, in order to promote 
harmony and the best interests of dogdorrr on the 
Pacific Coast, do hereby assent to the petition of the 
Seattle Dog Fanciers' Association, and be it there- 
fore 

Resolved, That all persons disqualified for partici- 
pation in shows held on the Pacific Coast under rules 
other than those of the American Kennel Club, in 
accordance with the resolutions of this committee, 
passed respectively on July 23, 190. March 18 and 
27, and June 9, 1905, be and hereby are reinstated to 
good standing in the American Kennel Club. 

Attest: J. P. NORMAN, 

Secretary Pat ific Advisory Cofirmittee, American Ken- 
nel Club." 

— — o 

Pneumonia in Dogs. 

The normal temperature of a dog (and this applies 
to the ox and the goat — all three beitrg the same) is 
101.4 degrees F. If the clinical thermometer shows the 
temperature as being lower- than this, it indicates that 
the dog is in a low, weak state, and needs stimulants; 
if. on the other hand, the temperature is in excess 
of 101.4 degrees, that points to feverishne >s. and any 
considerable excess, such, for instance, as a tempera- 
ture of 104 or 106 degrees, must be regarded as 
very serious, indeed. Now, coming to the subject of 
pneumonia — when a dog breathes heavily and has a 
high degree cf temperature, it will be pretty sa e to 
conclude thai there is serious lung trouble, ami it 
will be wise to call in the aid of a qualified veteri- 
nary surgeon. 

Pending the arrival of that gentleman, treatment 
may I e proceeded with as lolows: Remove the ani- 
mal to a warm apartment, the air in which is ren- 
dered humid by the agency of a bronchitis kettle. 
Moist warmth is absolutely essent'al to the treatment 
of all cases of lung complaints. Moist warmth should 
also he applied externally on flannel to the region of 
the lungs, and will be fouird of great benefit. Flannel 
dipped in hot water and rung out, and then spr inkled 
with a few drops of turpentine is the best possible 
thing to apply For medicine, a little of the following 
mixtu'-o may he given. Take a solution of acetate of 
ammonia, two drachms; camphor water, two ounces. 
Dose: A teaspOOnful for- a twenty pouird dog every 
three herurs. More or less iir proportion for dogs of 
other sizes. The important thing we wish to em- 
phasize, however, is that a veterinary surgeon should 
be called in. 

O 

Jackson's Napa Soda cleanses the stomach and 
renders the eye clear. 



COURSING NOTES. 

The officials < f the American Coursing Board have 
looked a long wav ahead and have already allotted 
next year's American Waterloo and also the Missis- 
sippi Valley Futurity. 

These two important events will be run at Hot 
Springs, South Dakota, a summer resort in the Black 
Hills. The club at that place bid $1000 for each 
event. The Futurity has been growing in popularity 
from year to year. There was a record entry of 144 
this year when D K. Cartter, formerly of Kansas but 
who is claimed as a Californian by his friends Irere. 
had the last three dogs iir the stake. These were 
Great Northern, Bartagus and The Flight. These 
three won $S00. the first prize being $450. 

The Christmas number of the Outdoor News has a 
profusely illustrated article on "The Greyhound's 
Proud Place in English Sport." The opening para- 
graph says: 

"Coursing in England is so ancient and honorable a 
sport that its traditions fill books, and its present high 
place in popularity is impressively demonstrated by 
the vast interest shown in the running of the Water- 
loo Cup and other prominent fixtures of the season. A 
winner of this 'blue ribbon' of the coursing world is 
worth, if not his weight in gold, at least very near it, 
when more than $5000 has been paid for a champion, 
and when his stake winnings have more than once 
passed the $5000 mark during his coursing career." 

This article should prove interesting reading to the 
coursing Officials on this Coast who are charged 
with keeping the sport honorable and on a high 
plane. Some day they wil realize that running it year 
in, year out. without giving its followers a breathing 
spell, is not the wisest policy. 



Union Coursing Park, which is located at Colnra, in 
San Mateo county, has been closed indefinitely. Early 
last month a delegation of citizens of Colma appeareu 
before the County Board of Supervisors of San Ma- 
teo, backing a petition that the board reconsider the 
action taken at its last meeting, when an ordinance 
was passed that prohibits the selling of , pools' and 
betting on the racing of dogs within the county lim- 
its. 

The petitioners were represented by Herbert I. 
Choynski, a Sarr Francisco attorney, who made a 
lengthy argument in favor of the petition, contend- 
ing that the sport was legitimate and clean, and that 
many citizens of the county made a living through 
caring for the dogs and doing other work in con- 
nection with the sport. 

After listening to the arguments advanced by 
Choynski, the board took immediate action, denying 
the petitiorr by a unanimous vote. The Menlo Park 
Improvement Association, having heard of the peti- 
tion to be presented, was represented at the hearing, 
and its representatives had a counter-petition with 
them. The Supervisors denied the petition for re- 
consideration without reference to the Menlo Park 
people, but afterwards heard them in reference to 
the question. The association, in its petition, com- 
mended the board for its recent action. 

The coursing people based their plea for reconsid- 
eration of the ordinance passed against them on the 
double ground that they have large sums of money 
invested here an i that many citizens of the county 
make their living through the sport. They attribute 
the responsibility for the adverse ordinance to Su- 
pervisor Elkenhotter: but, as a matter of fact, he 
was in no wise more responsible for the action than 
any other Supervisor. The Supervisors and the le- 
gitimate residents of the county are practically a unit 
in condemning the coursing game as inhuman, crooked 
and highly brutal, and so far as the matter of earn- 
ing of livelihoods is concerned they contend that the 
men who take care of the dogs and work about the 
coursing parks are not legitimate citizens of the 
county an I are here only because the sport is per- 
mitted here. It was maintained that the minute the 
sport is stopped they will migrate back to San Fran- 
cisco county, whence they came 

Enelesed coursing is now conducted at Ingleside 
Park, on Sat inlays ami Sundays. There is always a 
large attendance of visitors and leashmen. Divers 

attempts have been made to stop (lie sport in San 

Francisco county, but without avail. 

The allegations < f cruelty and brutality have been 
use. illy made by well meaning; but over enthusiastic 
and uninformed people. 

Where the partic ular colore I Individual is located 
In the Colma woodp le we are mil at present ad- 
Vised; it is probable that some time in the future he 
will be located and sent his wav. after which tHe 
well appointed Cuion Bark will he reopened. 

This Decision Is Porous. 

A case in Tezwell county, ill., will attract wide at- 
tention. It settled the unique point thai a dog Is not 
property, and except as lo ownership Is not subject to 
levy and cannot be classed as an asset in estates. It 
is neither a wild nor a domestic animal, and yet 
partakes of the Quality of both It is not an animal 
making its owner liable for trespass, as in (he case 
of swine, horses or cows, ami, in fact, has no stan- 
dard of consequence in court: 

William King of Blonmingtun was arrested, charged 
with the theft of a bulldog. His counsel raised the 
point that a dog is not' property and therefore can- 
not be stolen, lie was sustained by the statutes, and 
Judge Wnrthiugtun ordered Kings' release. 

. C : — ' 

Lots of Ducks. 

Ten members if the Del Paso Gun Club found the 
shooting good recently, each man getting the limit. 
That means 500 birds from thai reserve near Sacra- 
mento. 



10 



\ January 13. iac6 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 

Fair Sex Are Crack Shots. 

Signs of the times indicate that another held 01 
sportsman's supremacy is threatened by woman. 
There has been much talk of fine shooting by members 
of the gentler sex. but the genuine nature of the ri- 
valry has not been hitherto realized. 

Among the ladies of this city who may be mentioned 
aa skillful with the modern breechloader are: Mrs. 
W W Richards. Mrs A. N. Shields. Mrs. C. L. 
Griffith's Mrs H. P. Jacobson. Mrs. John B. Hauer, 
Mrs. Bert Wyman, Mrs. Al. M. Gumming and nu- 
merous other Dianas who can bring down a good bag 
of either ducks or quail. 

Not long since a woman duck hunter. Mrs. Nellie 
Bennett astonished some of the Portland, Or., sports- 
men by going out on the marsh with them and bag- 
ging the limit in workmanlike style, with her shotgun, 
which is of the repeating type. The achievement was 
heralded as remarkable, and without a parallel, wh.ch 
is in no sense true. 

Minneapolis boasts of two splendid women shots, 
Mrs W P. Shattuck and Mrs. Sumner S. Johnston, 
both of whom accompany their husbands each fall, 
and generally manage to hold up their end of the 
trigger work very ably. Both ladies are accomplished 
trapshots as well. 

Anv woman of good eye and plenty of nerve can 
learn to handle a light shotgun almost as quickly as 
a man. It is a noteworthy fact there are women, 
when at all proficient in the use of firearms, who are 
apt to become very good shots if given practice. 

A glance at the shooting record of the Duchess of 
Bedford would be a surprise to many men who feel 
themselves secure from feminine competition. Her 
grace's record of 3427 head of game in a single sea- 
son shows that the supremacy of man at the sport is 
no longer a thing undisputed. 

Wild duck shooting in February is no childish sport. 
Patience, endurance, and skill are needed to bring 
down twenty-nine birds with fifty-six shots, as the 
duchess has done. 

Of all forms of shooting, this sportswoman prefers 
that at driven grouse She shoots with a sixteen bore 
gun, and of course dispenses with the services of a 
loader. Indeed, there is nothing of the modem "me- 
chanical" shot about the Duchess of Bedford. 

She claims, without enthusiasm, to have brought 
down more than 200 "tame" pheasants in a day, and 
seventy at one stand, while her predilection for snipe 
shooting by herself, which she places only second to 
grouse driving, shows that she shoots for the sport 
rather than the bag. Nevertheless, she has shot as 
many as 115 partridges in a single day's driving. 

Until her marriage and return to England the 
duchess had never fired a shot in her life, but that tl|3 
instinct for sport was born in her is proved by tier 
rapid advance to a proficiency as that to which the 
figures bear witness. 

Another noblewoman whose prowess with the gun 
is well known is Lady Vivian. Although her record 
cannot be said to rival that of the Duchess of Bed- 
ford, her shooting is far better than that of many male 
experts. 



Slaughter of Caribou. 

Probably never again in Alaska, and certainly not 
in Tanana, will there he a repetition of the scenes 
that accompanied the biggest run of caribou ever seen 
in Alaska during October. Several thousand of the 
animals passed through the heart of the settled por- 
tion of Tanana valley. Miners shot from their cabin 
doors. They were killed from decks of steamers and 
for days the surrounding hills reverberated with the 
sound of firearms. Frightened by the shots of the 
hunters, the caribou stampeded across the creek in 
bands of hundreds, trampling over sluice boxes and 
getting tangled in the works. In view of the many 
hunters and the fact that the hills have been alive 
with game, it would naturally be supposed that the 
mortality would be great, but there is only one in- 
stance recorded where one man has killed more than 
twenty. The greatest number were slaughtered by 
miners and will serve for their winter's meat. Very 
few of those who flocked from the town to the hills 
secured any game, and at no time has caribou meat 
sold in Fairbanks for less than 26 cents a pound. 



An Ingenious Angler. 

\V. G. Swain is an enthusiastic duck hunter and 
member of the Montezuma Gun Glub. As to being 
an angler, he has never made any claim, until last 
Saturday, when Black Jack Lemmer and the Dook of 
Ayden proudly displayed 15 fine steelhead to the ad- 
miring gaze of students at the "symposium." Lem- 
mer's remark. "Why don't you go up to Russian 
river. Bill?" elicited the following answer: 

"My first trip into the mountains was made with 
most any purpose other than fishing in view, for that 
was something which held no interest whatever for 
me 1 even listened indifferently to the wonderful 
tales of fishing luck and misfortune told by the other 
fellows while we sat around a blazing fire of spruce 
boughs during the cool evenings. < >ur camp was on 
one of the many little streams flowing into the Bear 
river, near Steamboat Springs, and the trout were 
very plentiful. 

One day I had strolled up the creek much further 
thai* usual and had got to a little canyon that I had 
never heard of before, where the pools were so small 
and clear that the. fish could be plainly seen in great 
numbers darting to and fro, but not when they saw 
you, for then they would lie perfectly quiet, close to 
the bottom and blending with the sand and rocks so 
that they could hardly be distinguished. Having a 
piece of string in my pocket I thought I would have 
some fun with the fish, so, catching a nice grass- 
hopper and tieing it to the end of the line with a cou- 
ple of knots, and cutting a branch. I went up behind 



a rock and threw the hopper into a pool in which 
there were several trout. Then they all made a 
move for it, the largest caught it and made off, trying 
to swallow it. but I gave a quick jerk and succeeded 
in jerking him out of the water onto the bank and 
caught him before he flopped back. Gutting a V- 
shaped branch I strung him on it and then went back 
to try again, but only succeeded in scaring the rest, 
;is my bait was torn and not much more than a knot. 
So, catching another hopper, I tried the next pool and 
after several attempts jerked another nice fish out. 
It was only when the fish was headed from me and 
the bait would catch in the corner of the fish's month 
that they could be jerked out, half the time they be- 
ing merely jerked above the water, but by keeping at 
it I got my branch full and then went back to camp to 
show my lii st string of trout and to try to explain 
tow it happened, but the fellows declared that I de- 
served the medal for fish stories. After that there 
were none more enthusiastic for fishing and fish sto- 
ries than I." 



Verdi Hatchery Abandoned. 

The State of California will hatch no more fish in 
the State of Nevada The Galifornia Fish Commis- 
sion recently informed the Nevada Gommissioners 
that the hatchery at Verdi would be abandoned and 
that the troughs there would be presented to Washoe 
county for similar use. The Commission has pro- 
cured a supply of Nevada rainbow trout sufficient for 
its use for the present. 

For three years the California Commission has been 
t. iking half a million to a million rainbow trout from 
the Truckee every year. Ten per cent of these have 
been turned back into the river after they have 
reached the swimming stage in return for the privi- 
lege. The Washoe county commissioners figured that 
under natural conditions no greater per cent of the 
spawn would hatch and grow to the swimming stage. 



tunity. if so willed, to damage the article out of spite 
against the maker. The barrel is then passed on to 
a man who ascertains the bore of same, and stamps 
it with a number, so the next man. who is a loader, 
knows exactly what charge to put In it. The bar- 
rels are then passed on to the loading-room. Here 
everything is done to prevent fraud and insure safety, 
the floors being kept well dampened and clean. The 
loading-room is divided into three compartments. In 
the first the barrels are loaded; in the second the 
charges are rammed home with special rods kept for 
the purpose: in the third they are primed and "made 
ready" for firing, and then sent to the firing-room. 

The firing-room is a large building made of sheet- 
iron, and arranged like a Venetian blind. The lathes, 
as it were, are closed when ready for firing, and 
opened to allow for ventilation after. The barrels are 
laid along grooved racks and fired with a train of 
gunpowder which connects the breech vents with 
each other. There are heaps of sand both before and 
behind the barrels, to catch the charge in front and 
barrels behind. The force of the explosion, of course, 
shoots them backwards. Any barrels which may have 
missed fire are reprimed and put back on the racks 
again. Then comes the hot-water test. This means 
that the barrels are filled with hot water and cov- 
ered with a plug, and then struck heavily on top; so 
that if there happens to be any flaw or pinhole, the 
water at once escapes. When common barrels are 
proved, they have to stand for a day before un- 
dergoing the hot-water test, so that the acid in the 
powder will eat into any flaw and make it more read- 
ily observed. 

Now the process of "provisional proof" is done, they 
are made ready for "definite proof." The breech ac- 
tions are now fitted, and the barrels are proved with 
cartridges. This prevents cheap and dangerous breech 
actions being used. In some cases the breech actions 
are blown to pieces or bulged by the force of the ex- 




J. B. COLEMAN AND DAVE HAREFIELD 
Field and Tule Ciub 



owing to the alleged poisonous condition of the water 
caused by the paper mills at Floriston. 

Morrill & Elliott, who operate a large trout pre- 
serve in the Sierras, southwest of Reno, asked for 
the contract of the California Commission and it 
was extended to them. Their hatchery is in Ne- 
vada. 



plosion, and then have to be rehardened and reproved 
until found to be sound. If a man's gun bursts, let 
him ask himself why, as he certainly cannot blame the 
proof- house authorities. 



Geese Are Plentiful. 

Reports from many sections note the presence of 
thousands upon thousands of wild geese. In the vi- 
cinity of Willows, Frank Burgi, a well-known trap 
shot, has established his headquarters and has been 
doing a land office business in pulling off successful 
goose hunts. 

The season for his kind of sport has now com- 
menced in earnest; and many prominent sportsmen 
from different points along the Pacific Coast, as well 
as in the East, will be guests of Mr. Burgi, who has 
every facility to give them the shoot of their lives. 

Mr. Burgi is thoroughly familiar with the favorite 
feeding grounds of the birds; he uses live decoys, 
and he and assistants know how to call the geese to 
them. This expert goose calling is quite an art in 
itself. For two shooters to bring down over 300 birds 
is not considered at all extraordinary for a morning 
shoot — and yet the visiting sportsmen hardly believe 
it until it is proved to them. 

Frank takes his guests to the grounds in his com- 
fortable, large automobile: the live decoys are there 
ready for business: the "calls" go out to the wild 
birds — and the "men behind the guns" do the rest. 
It is sport with a big S, and enthusiastic sportsmen 
come again. 



How Gun Barrels Are Proved. 

The method of proving gun barrels at the Bir- . 
mingham and London proof-houses are exactly the 
same Each barrel is handed in with a label bearing 
a number only; this prevents the workmen knowing 
from whom the barrel came, and they haveTf>o oppor- 



Large Take of Salmon Eggs. 

Tehama county is deeply interested in the suc- 
cess of the government fishery at Tehama, and the 
record-breaking catch of salmon eggs means much to 
that section. The fishing industry is still in its in- 
fancy, and facts and figures relating to this govern- 
ment enterprise should prove interesting reading. 

The United States Fish Commission and the Cali- 
fornia Fish Commission act in conjunction in this 
work, the first named securing the eggs and prepar- 
ing them for shipment, and the latter hatching and 
distributing them. 

Under the management of the present State Board, 
consisting of W. W. Van Arsdale, W. E. Gerber and 
J. W. Birmingham, with their efficient Chief Deputy, 
Charles A. Vogelsang, the work has been more suc- 
cessfully prosecuted than heretofore, and it is today 
one of the most valuable industries on the Coast. 

The work has now reached such proportions and 
proved of such value that additional facilities will be 
necessary at the Sisson station in order to accommo- 
date the demands made to successfully handle the 
constantly increasing supply of eggs and their proper 
distribution. 

Captain G. H. Lainbson. who is employed by the 
government, has liberal alowances of money to suc- 
cessfully prosecute his work, and the Sisson station 
of the California State Commission, under the man- 
agement of Superintendent W. H Shebley, should not 
be hampered. It is argued, for a lack of facilities to 
successfully hatch and distribute the fish furnished 
by the government stations; besides keeping up and 
improving the hatch of game fish for the lakes and 
streams of the state. 

Mr. Shebley has been engaged in fish culture for 
the past twenty-three years. He is a conscientious, 
hard-working man, with heart and soul in his duties, 



January 13 190<ij 



11 



and it is much to his credit that the California State 
Commission, at least the Sisson station, has reaches 
the importance it now sustains in fish culture on the 
Coast. 



Reams has run down two coyotes in upper Suisun 
valley during the past two weeks. 



Reduction of Bag Limits. 

Quite an agitation is being stirred up among South- 
ern California sportsmen relative to reducing the bag 
limit on ducks to twenty-five birds a day. 

No attempt at securing a state law to this effect is 
likely to be made for some time at least, as the San 
Francisco clubmen are united against it, and their 
bad example has injured the cause of game protec- 
tion elsewhere. Locally several t>f the clubs, notably 
the Bolsa Chica, have settled the thing for them- 
selves by making twenty-five bird limits 

It is generally conceded by far-seeing sportsmen 
that protection of ducks during the breeding season, 
both in the United States and in Alaska, is the 
sanest scheme of saving the waterfowl, but the twen- 
ty-five bird limit, if made general throughout the 
country, would be of great service. 

The clubs, which of their own volition limit their 
bags to twenty-five, which after all is all any man 
wants — enough for himself and half a dozen friends — 
give proof conclusive of their sportsmanship and are 
wholly to be commended by all, but at present the 
matter seems to be one for individual regulation. 



Coyote Hunting. 

After several sheep had been killed belonging to 
Senator B. F. Rush and Claire Morrili in the Potrero 
lulls, near Suisun, a reward of $5 each from the above 
two gentlemen and Peter Mortensen was offered for 
the coyote that was suposed to be in that neighbor- 
hood. Sherman Reams was asked to bring his three 
deer hounds to the Rush ranch to make a chase. He 
started out Wednesday morning, accompanied by Ben 
Reams and John Oliver, and later was joined by Mr. 
Morrill. A large coyote was started at the east end 
of the ranch and after a chase of several miles waa 
killed by Ben Reams. In addition to the amount 
subscribed above, $20 will be paid by the Solano 
County Sheepmen's Association. Messrs. Reams and 
Oliver received $35 for their day's work. Sherman 



Can Fish Hear? 

In a German scientific paper the often-discussed 
question has been raised: Can fish hear? and the 
answer seems, as usual, to be in the negative. It 
is believed that many fish are conscious of rapid 
vibrations communicating with the water; but it is 
not thought probable that this is perceived by the 
auditory organs. Single loud explosions in water ara 
found to be totally disregarded by fish. It is, there- 
fore, not finally proved that all fish cannot hear; but 
the concensus of the opinion of the zoologists seems 
to favor the idea that fish, like bees, are deaf. 



Bulk Powders Win the High Averages. 

At the tournament held at Phoenix, Arizona; De- 
cember 28, 29. 30, 31, 1905, the three highest profes- 
sional averages were made with DuPont Smokeless; 
also the first and third amateur averages. Second 
amateur average was made with Hazard Smokeless. 

PACIFIC COAST TRIALS. 



Quite a large attendance of club members and visit- 
ing sportsmen are in Bakersfield this week watching 
the progress of the twenty-third annual trials of the 
Pacific Coast Field Trials Club. 

The Derby was finished this forenoon, the winners 
w r ere: Jos E. Terry's English Setter bitch Bessie 
Mortimer (Kilgarif-Maggie F.) first: Hugh Hop- 
kins' English Setter bitch Aunt Marie (Uncle B.- 
Sport's Belle) second, and Frank Schumacher's Poin- 
ter bitch Lady Belle (Teddy Kent-Jack's Fashion) 
third. 

With W. J. Baughn were associate judges Henry 
L. Betten and J. H. Schumacher There were 22 
starters in the Derby. 11 English Setters and 11 
Pointers. Much was expected of the Derby puppies, 
particularly so, because last year's Derby was run 
over practically the same ground upon which there 
were enough birds to, it was hoped, give the dogs a 
chance to show some of the brilliant work remem- 
bered by many who were present last year. . 



In this there was something of a disappointment, 
for two reasons; the class of the dogs was not of 
the high standard of the previous year, with of course 
some exceptions, and weather and ground conditions 
were such as to preclude, except at odd times, any- 
thing like bird work. The weather w^as warm and 
the ground dry and dusty, in many places the alkali 
was as thick on the surface of the ground as if the 
field had been whitewashed. Nose work was out of 
the question. On the first day dogs repeatedly ran 
over birds and flushed small bevies. In one heat, 
that between Aunt Marie and Hickorywood, the dogs 
worked in low cover on scattered birds. For ten min- 
utes the dogs failed to locate a single bird. Birds, 
however, were flushed from the tumble weed that 
the dogs had gone over twenty times. On Tuesday 
Don and Senator Jack got into a large bevy, Jack 
finally flushing them, to the surprise of everybody 
who witnessed the occurrence. The dogs were finally 
given credit for working under most disadvantageous 
conditions. 

The first five braces of the All-Age were started 
today in different cover, open ground and sparse 
willow thickets on section 25 of the Stockdale ranch. 
Jose E. Terry's Kilgariff was put down on open 
ground and after making two wide casts and working 
the ground grandly, made a bee line for cover near 
the railroad track. When the handler came up he 
was on point. Here he was credited with six singles 
and a bevy points. McCloud Boy was a bit un- 
steady. 

The heat between Belle Fontaine and Policy Girl 
was full of action and work. Many birds were found. 
Belle made two bevy points and several singles. Girl 
located a bevy and was credited with several points. 
| The class of the All-Age dogs is good and on the 
new ground it is not going too far to say that some 
splendid results will develop before the final heat of 
the stake. 

The All -Age will probably be concluded on Friday 
morning. The championship stake will follow and 
the membe;s' stake will close the running. 



J. X. DeWITT. 



Bakersfield, January 10. 



TO PREVENT DEGENERATION. 



Dr. A. S. Alexander says: "There Is 
a tendency in all pure bred animals to 
degenerate or retrogress towards orig- 
inal and less perfect types and noth- 
ing will more surely and speedily stim- 
ulate this tendency than the lack of 
nutritious food. 

"In the absence of sufficient nutri- 
tion, or complete nutrition, the possi- 
bilities of perfection, inherited from 
pure bred sires or dams but partially 
mateiialize or wholly fail to assert 
themselves. The well born, but in- 
completely nourished colt fails to de- 
velop and at maturity is no less a 
"weed" than the ordinary scrub or na- 
tive animal. On the other hand, if the 
dam is adequately nourished on com- 
plete rations during pregnancy and 
when nursing, and the colt, from wean- 
ing time forward, is as perfectly and 
fully fed, it will, in all probability, de- 
velop to the high standard of size, 
power, quality and character made 
Vossible by its breeding. 

"In addition to proper feeding it is 
likewise necessary to protect the 
young developing animal against 
every possible cause of debility, dis- 
comfort and unhealth that would tend- 
to retard its growth. Shelter must 
therefore be sufficient, disease must be 
fought against, vermin must be pre- 
vented from sapping the constitution, 
and fresh air, sunlight adequate exer- 
cise and kindly care must take a full 
part in perfecting the development of 
the animal." 

VITAL, FERTILE EGGS. 

The most important problem in 
hatching is that of securing fertile 
eggs; in fact they are the one thing 
absolutely required. The percentage 
hatched will depend upon the fertility 
and vitality of the eggs placed in the 
incubator or under hens, and the fer- 
tility of the eggs will depend chiefly 
upon the vigor of the parent stock. 
The conditions necessary to the ferti- 
lization of eggs are simply tho.<-e which 
will secure good health to the parent 
stock from which the eggs are secured. 

There are a number of conditions 
which will determine the health and 
vigor of the parent stock, and the per- 
centage of eggs that will hatch. Free 
range for laying stock will conduce 
health and vigor, as it develops a 
strong muscular system. Eggs from 
such stock will hatch exceptionally 
well and will hatch strong, healthy and 
vigorous chicks. The percentage of 
such eggs hatched will often run as 
high as ninety. 

In order to secure the best condi- 
tions of laying stock, wholesome food 
and good, clean houses are absolutely 
essential. Every poultryman under- 



stands this perfectly. No matter how 
good the incubator is, the results will 
be disappointing if the houses are reek- 
ing with filth, or if the fowls are im- 
properly fed. 

Eggs also, as is well known become 
lower in vitality with age and after a 
time become worthless for hatching 
purposes. Eggs will often hatch after 
they are a month old, but the chicks 
will be less vigorous and many of them 
utterly worthless. Such weak chicks 
are often attributed to the failure of 
the incubator, but there could be no 
greater injustice. — E G. Wyckoff in 
American Fancier. 



TEETH OF SWINE. 

The hog has more teeth than any 
other farm animal. When it has its 
set complete it possesses in all forty- 
four teeth. The horse has forty teeth, 
while cattle and sheep have thirty-two 
each. The forty-four teeth of the pig 
consists of six incisors, two canine, 
eight remolar and six molar teeth in 
each jaw. Another peculiar fact about 
the dentition of the pig is that while 
the incissors or front teeth in the up- 
per jaw bear a close resemblance to 
those of the horse, the corresponding 
teeth in the lower jaw closely resemble 
those of a dog. It is also worthy of 
note that the molars of the pig gradu>- 
ally increase in size from the front to 
the rear, the most backward of these 
grinders being several times larger 
than those in front. 



Good milkers are reported in all the 
English and Scotch beef breeds just as 
they are bred to improve the milk 
yields or the reverse. The English 
papers tell us of good milkers and 
milking families in the Herefords, An- 
gus and Galloways. Some cows give 
more milk than the calf wants and 
some have good records in the dairy. 
The Shorthorn in England is the lead- 
ing beef and dairy breed; a Shorthorn 
cow 15 years old took the champion 
prize at the recent London Dairy Show. 
Breed and handle your cows for milk. 
They raise better calves and make 
better cattle. 

When you find an animal is unprofit- 
able to keep, whether it is a steer that 
will not fatten or a dairy cow that 
fattens too easily, you cannot sell it 
too soon. The butcher should get all 
such animals, not your neighbor. w f ho 
raises breeding stock. The sooner 
cattle, hogs and sheep that are not just 
right are slaughtered, the better it is 
for the country. 



pair they may be sold as such and will 
probably return a better figure than If 
sold singly. The young and unworthy 
males there is more question about. 
Whether to sell or to hold in the hope 
of future improvement is always a 
matter of the gravest moment. In gen- 
eral, however, it will be found to be 
good reasoning that the first cost is al- 
ways the least, and if the material is 
not promising to work on there are in- 
deed few men who can take cull colts 
and make great horses of them. There 
is notwithstanding a place for every 
horse foaled, and if properly placed he 
will fulfill his destiny in life. 



Over forty different sorts of Babcock 
testers are manufactured but the es- 
sential principle is the same in all. 
It was invented by Dr. Babcock anil 
given without price to the public, there- 
fore none of the forty or more can be 
patented In their eagerness to get 
something that would sell, a number of 
manufacturers have gotten up cheap 
testers which are inaccurate and un- 
safe, to the serious detriment of the 
tester. Properly made and rightly 
handled, this instrument is of infinite 
value. In buying a tester — and every 
owner of a herd should have one — go 
to a trustworthy house, pay a fair 
price and not be put off with some 
cheap Christmas toy. 



It is possible to raise calves profit- 
ably on warm separator milk by sub- 
stituting whole oats for the cream re- 
moved. One of the advantages of 
hand raising is that after the calf is 
grown sufficiently to go on dry feed 
it does better than a calf raised by the 
cow. Early maturity no doubt Is hin- 
dered by the hand feeding, but it made 
up fully or nearly so by educating the 
calf to hustle for itself to a certain 
extent. 

The dairy cow is rarely a mortgage 
lifter in this section. Why? Be- 
cause the man who has wrestled long 
with a burdensome mortgage is not 
the type of farmer to call on the cow 
for help. He hopes "to get out" next 
year by planting more cotton. 

Charcoal is an excellent thing for 
fowls whether in confinement or run- 
ning at large. It is Inexpensive and 
so easily provided that no flock should 
be permitted to be without It. Let it 
be granulated and placed where the 
birds can readily have access to it. 



Probably in no country in the world 
has farming reached greater perfection 
than in Denmark, where almost every 
available foot of land is precious ana 
well utilized, but where consumption 
and production are more evenly bal- 
anced. Co-operation among farmer* 
is said to be the key to their successful 
operations. There is a co-operative 
dairy at Esbjerg which has a mem- 
bership of 230 farmers, milking 1,500 
cows, almost the entire output of the 
milk being turned into butter and ship- 
ped to England. The milk is paid for 
by weight and quality. 

The dairyman who caters to city 
trade knows better than any other how 
often complaint is made about cream 
that will not whip. The richness of 
per cent of fat and the temperature 
have more to do with this quality In 
cream than any other factor. It Is 
well to remember that cream contain- 
ing 35 to 40 per cent fat will whip at 
55 to 60 degrees; 30 per cent fat at 45 
degrees; 20 per cent fat at about 33 
degrees. Cream sold to city trade 
usually contains 18 to 25 per cent fat, 
and therefore must be cooled to a 
lower temperature than it is customary 
to whip cream. 



Now is an excellent time to get a 
general culling of studs of either pure 
breds or grades, says Breeder's Ga- 
zette. If two can be matched up In a 



The top notch of quality In the de- 
mand for good poultry has never been 
reached. The demand for the best 
has never been supplied. There Is no 
danger of getting it too good, but it 
often suffers from being off in qual- 
ity. 



The best estimate as to possible pro- 
fit from poultry can be gained from the 
actual results attained by careful peo- 
ple. A man in New Hampshire shows 
from carefully kept records that he 
made from 450 hens during 1904, $747.- 
67. These same hens consumed $779.91 
worth of all kinds of grain supplies. 
This Is a very good showing, and the 
same results can be gained by every 
careful person. The poultryman re- 
ferred to started In 1887 with ninety- 
not necessary to have summer weather, 
four hens, and now keeps about 500. 
Those who succeed best, in handling 
poultry begin in a small way and work 
up.— Country Gentleman. 

The story conies from the Philippine 
Islands of the untimely end of a prize 
Jersey cow valued at over $1000. The 
cow was 1 to be shipped to the interior 
together with another cow of no spe- 
cial value intended for beef. When the 
time came for fresh meat the cook 
of the transport ship went to slaughter 
the ordinary cow. He looked both 
beasts over, the prize winner was the 
best looking, and the cook killed the 
prize Jersey before those who knew 
which was' which could enter, and the 
ordinary cow is still alive and happy. 

. o 

Young fowls are the ones that form 
bad habits. If they are not formed at 
that time, they never will become trou- 
blesome. They can be kept from flying 
by clipping both wings, if clipping one 
will not do It. 



12 



l January 13 i w< »i 



THE NEW GUERNSEY CHAMPION. 

The Guernsey cow, Yeksa Sunbeam 
15439, owned by Mr. Fred Rietbrock, 
Athens, Wis., has completed the largest 
year's record of any cow in the world, 
made under public supervision that of 
an Advanced Register and agricultural 
experiment station. This record is as 
follows: Total, October, 1904. and 
September. 1905. inclusive, 14920.8 
pounds milk. 5.74- average per cent., 
butter fat, 857.15 pounds butter fat. 
This was made under the rules and 
regulations of the Advanced Register 
of Guernsey Cattle and supervised by 
the Wisconsin Rxperiment Station. 
Adding one-sixth to the butter fat to 
cover the weight of salt and water 
found in butter in addition to the but- 
ter fat, we have one thousand pounds 
of butter for the year's work of this 
cow. 

Yeksa Sunbeam 15439 was bred by 
the late W. D. Richardson of Garden 
City. Minn. She was dropped April 
2. 1895, making her about nine and 
one-half years old when commencing 
her record. She calved Sept. 11, 1904. 
and was not in calf at the end of the 
year's record. 

Feed of Yeksa Sunbeam during the 
test was as follows: 

October, silage and hay 25 pounds, 
with 15 pounds grain mixture composed 
of one part oilmeal. two parts ground 
oats, two parts gluten feed and four 
parts bran. November, corn silage 30 
pounds, with grain mixture the same 
as October. 

December, same as November. Janu- 
ary, silage 30 pounds, rutabagas 10 
pounds, 15 pounds grain mixture com- 
posed of one part ground oats, 10 parts 
gluten feed, two parts bran, one part 
oilmeal, and alfalfa, hay, ad. lib. Feb- 
ruary, silage 30 pounds, rutabagas 10 
pounds. 14 pounds grain mixture com- 
posed of four parts wheat bran, two 
parts gluten feed, one part corn meal 
and as much alfalfa as she would eat. 
March, April and May, same as Feb- 
ruary. 

June, pasture, mixed clover hay and 
6 pounds above grain mixture. July 
10 pounds mixed grain ration composed 
of 300 pounds bran. 1200 pounds oats, 
200 pounds gluten feed and 100 pounds 
oilmeal. Pasture. August, 10 pounds 
above grain mixture, 8 pounds green 
clover at noon and pasture. Septem- 
ber, clover pasture, green corn, clover 
hay, and 2 pounds gluten, 6 pounds 
bran, 4 pounds ground oats, 2 pounds 
oilmeal. 

If you will figure the matter over 
and care to make a statement, you will 
find that her largest milk production 
for one day was August 19, 1905, upon 
the basis "f our composite three-day 
test, her butter fat production for that 
day, based upon 5.9 per cent fat and 
52 pounds milk, was 3.07 pounds fat. 
Her best week was from August 17 to 
August 23. inclusive, during which 
period she made 352 pounds of milk, 
our home test reported, having been 
based upon her production of Aug. 17, 
18 and 19. 5.09 per cent., would make 
20.77 pounds fat in that week. Her 
largest monthly production of butter 
fat was August, 1905, when she made 
81.26 pounds fat, while her largest milk 
production for one month was August, 
1905. when she made 1463 pounds 
milk. During the first 120 days, com- 
mencing October. 1904, she made 
300.53 pounds fat, while during the 
first 187 days- she made 451.49 pounds 
fat. Her lowest per cent of butter fat 
during the twelve months in question 
was June. 1905, when the percentage 
was 5.25; while her highest per cent 
of fat, 6.08, was in December. In 
ihree different months, to-wit. Decem- 
ber, January and March, her per cent 
of fat was a trifle over six, while dur- 
ing the other nine months, the per cent 
was over five and under six. Her aver- 
age weight during the year has been 
about 1150 pounds. Her best work 
during the year has been made on pas- 
turage, supplemented during the hot 
weather and fly time with soiling crop 
composed of oats and peas. For the 
size of the cow and the amount of her 
production. I think the grain ration 
has been comparatively small. She 
has always had a good appeitie for 
roughage, and, of course, has had 
plenty of it. 

This record is not only a great credit 
to Mr. Rietbrock and his herd, but of 
estimable value lb the interests of the 
Guernsey breed, as it shows in an in- 
disputable manner the capability of a 
Guernsey cow. — ICorr. Mass. Plough- 
man. 

o 

Sponges— S. Adderley, 307 Market St. 



HOGS AND SHEEP AS MORTGAGE 
LIFTERS. 



It requires a comparatively small 
amount cf capital to start in the busi- 
ness of raising either sheep or hogs. 
Who has not seen a single ewe lamb 
lay the foundation of a profitable flock, 
or one old sow become the progenitor 
of a herd able to lift the mortgage off 
a farm? 

The second point we make in favor 
of choosing sheep and hogs as the ani- 
mals to be kept is the fact that ex- 
pensive buildings are not essential. A 
straw stack, some rails or poles, and a 
little work and ingenuity will supply 
the rest. 

Hogs and sheep are desirable be- 
cause of quick returns. It takes five 
years to grow a horse to maturity, 
and he needs some education before he 
is marketable. The mortgage might 
mature and be foreclosed during that 
period. On the other hand, pigs and 
lambs can be brought to a marketable 
age in as many months — and no edu- 
cation is needed. 

We recommend these animals as 
mortgage lifters because both ex- 
perience and observation have shown 
them to be (in proper hands) admira- 
bly adapted to that purpose. 

A few common mistakes of the in- 
experienced with sheep and hogs are: 

1. Starting on a large scale on a 
booming market; e. g.. sheep at the 
present time. 

2. Lack of proper care in the selec- 
tion of foundation stock. Good breed- 
ing is not enough. Must have good 
individuality. 

3. Careless handling likely to en- 
gender and promote diseases. 

4. Feeding beyond the profitable 
period. 

Among the things much desired are: 
First, high-class foundation stock; 
second, vigorous growth; third, con- 
tinuous growth: fourth, early matu- 
rity; fifth, prompt marketing: sixth, 
get stock ready for market a month 
in advance of the general supply. 

METHODS OF SKIMMING MILK. 

Professor Farrington of the Wiscon- 
sin Dairy School, sums up the differ- 
ent methods of skimming in the fol- 
lowing brief manner: 

"These methods are the shallow- 
pans, the deep setting of cans of milk 
in cold water, the water or equatic 
separator and the centrifugal separa- 
tor. 

''The water separator is so inferior 
a method that it is not used by the 
best dairymen at the present time; the 
other three methods are still in use 
but the centrifugal separator is the 
most efficient of them all. The losses 
of butter-fat in the skim-milk are 
greatest when milk is set in shallow 
pans. Deep setting in cold water is a 
little better, but the centrifugal sep- 
arator may be run so as to leave only 
one-tenth per cent butterfat in the 
skim-milk. 

"It has been estimated that the 
losses of butter-fat by the different 
methods of skimming the milk of 20 
cows in a year amounting to $120 by 
the shallow pan setting. $60 by the 
deep jetting and $15 by centrifugal 
separator. This is based on a price 
of 20 cents per pound for butter and an 
average loss of fat in the skim-milk 
by each method." 

In their natural state fowls are 
heavy consumers df vegetable matter 
and insects. This teaches that under 
artificial conditions fowls should have 
substitutes for their natural food. In 
the way of vegetable matter cabbage 
leaves or a whole head suspended 
where the fowls' can get at it at will, 
by reaching well up for it. are hard to 
get: though finely cut clover hay is 
excellent, and beet tops, or whole 
beets, are beneficial. Mteat scraps sub- 
stitute the insects nicely, and cut bone 
supplies much needed material in win- 
ter that fowte get out of the earth in 
summer. Imitate nature clocely as 
possible in feeding. 

In selecting hens to be kept for 
breeders, take those with small, smooth 
and neat heads well developed combs, 
bright eyes, and nice tapering necks, 
long and deep bodies, active move- 
ments, vigorous in constitution, and 
good layers, advises N. J. Shepherd in 
Kansas Farmer. 

In an egg-laying contest the White 
Leghorn laid more eggs, on less feed, 
than any other breed, although they 
are not the best all around fowls. 



FEEDING LAMBS. 

Everything that is raised on the 
farm should be marketed in its fully 
developed form wheri possible. There 
is no reason why a middleman should 
have the profits that he requires if he 
handles the stock. 

This applies to the sheep business. 
Many farmers have conveniences 
for raising a carload of lambs, but they 
raise some short of that number and 
sell them to the dealer, who resells 
them to the feeder who' finishes them 
for market, says the Wisconsin Agri- 
culturist. Then the farmer who sold 
the lambs sometimes sells his corn to 
the same feeder who bought his lambs. 
The dealer expects to make a profit or 
he would not have bought the lambs, 
and the feeder would not have bought 
them, or the corn, if he had not ex- 
pected to make a profit on both. The 
original producer may make money on 
the lambs, but he has let three possible 
profits slip by that he might as well 
have had. 

The lamb should be started on feed 
while young, and the feeding con- 
tinued and gradually Increased during 
the fall. This should prevent any of 
the setbacks that might occur in Aug- 
ust or later in the fall when grass gets 
short. A young lamb will make larger 
gains for the feed consumed than older 
ones hence the advisability of start- 
ing early. 

The bunch of lambs should be as 
even as possible for the best results in 
feeding and the highest price on the 
market. Any planning to feed a car- 
load- of lambs or more next year can 
arrange this to a certain extent this 
fall, by using a strong, vigorous ram 
and seeing that all the ewes are bred 
at as near the same lime as possible. 

The farmer should consider himself 
a manufacturer, and make the most 
money out of his works by marketing 
a finished product instead of the raw 
material. The farmer is better able 
to do this than many manufacturers 
because he can use the waste product 
—the manure— to better advantage 
than most manufacturers the waste 
from their factories. Every load of 
manure put back on the "land is like 
putting capital stock into the busi- 
ness. 

POULTRY POINTERS. 

The lime which goes into the shells 
of the eggs will not be lacking if the 
food is varied, as nearly all foods con- 
tain lime in some form. Experiments 
in that direction show that the use of 
oyster shells does not insure a suffi- 
ciency of lime, though oyster shells 
will serve the purpose to a limited ex- 
tent if the food does not provide the 
necessary lime. 

It is c laimed that a hen may be con- 
fined on a board Hoor, allowed only 
flint gravel for the gizzard, fed liber- 
ally on plenty of green food, with a 
small allowance of grain, having ample 
opportunity for scratching in litter of 
some kind, and she will lay perfect 
eggs with proper shells, without even 
the least proportion of oyster shells 
or lime near by her. The lime will be 
derived from the food, and in a proper 
condition so as to be easily digested 
ami assimilated and in a state in whic h 
it becomes immediately available as a 
constituency of the egg. 

There are hens in some sections that 
are far from the sources of supply of 
oyster shells, yet they equal those in 
other localities as egg producers. Na- 
ture prompts the fowls to select the 
food best adapted for their purpose, 
and if given a variety, they will bal- 
ance the supply so necessary for the 
production of eggs as well as provide 
for their bodily wants.— Farm and 
Fireside. 

When the weather is cold a good feed 
late in the afternoon is plenty of com, 
so that the" fowls may go to roost with 
a full crop of heat-giving food. No 
more should be given than will be 
picked up clean. 

Where fowls are confined and grass 
is scarce, it is well to let part on the 
grass for a half day or a few hours, 
a ie 1 let (he others on for a few hours 
In this way all get some green stuff. 

No fence has proven so good and so 
economical as woven wire for poultry 
fences. It is sometimes necessary to 
put wide boards at the bottom to keep 
the fowls from fighting through the 
fence. 

It is exceedingly dim: nit to muiitain 
grass in a yard where there are many 
fowls. It is best managed by fencing 
off one portion, and keeping the fowls 
off it until the grass grows. 



GOOD DRAFT HORSES. 

By means of about 2.000 measure- 
ments in CohimbUS, <>., of draft horses 
classed as extra heavy, medium good 
heavy, extra good light and medium 
good light A. H. Snyder reached these 
conclusions among others: 

The extra good heavy draft horse 
compared with his less valuable broth- 
i i- is not so high for his weight, is 
deeper in the chest, shorter from the 
chest to the ground, larger in the 
Chest girth, hut slightly smaller in 
bone. Compared with the length of 
the head, the shoulder is longer, the 
bat k shorter, and the hock closer to 
the ground; the chest and hips are 
slightly wider, while the length of the 
croup is slightly less. 

Regarding the fifty-five hcrses con- 
sidered extra good heavy draft, their 
weight in working condition varied 
from 1.3S5 to 1.930 pounds, the height 
varied from 15% to 17 hands 1«4 
inches: the girth varied from 84 to 
99 Vfe inches, while the circumference 
of the cannon midway between the 
knee and the fetlock varied from 8% 
to 10% inches. Of the 101 horses 
measured only two measured more than 
98 inches around the girth and only 
live measured over 94 inches. 

The c omposite of an extra good draft 
horse as found in use on the streets of 
Colufnbus was a hor-e weighing a 
little more than 1 600 pounds, 16% 
hands high, measuring 90 inches 
around the girth and 9% inches around 
the cannon at its center. 

The annual question concerning the 
disposition of the stable-made manure 
comes up as the pile begins to assume 
formidable proportions. By far the 
best way of taking rare of it is to 
spread it on the fields where it will go 
down into the soil and be in readiness 
for the crop which is to be sown in the 
spring. If it is to be stored the ideal 
place is the pit with cement bottom, 
which will hold the liquid eerement. 
If this cannot be done then store it 
under a shed, placing it in layers, and 
let the hogs root It over. If even this 
is not feasible, put it in piles not very 
high and cover with any old rough 
hoards — almost anything that will keep 
out the rain which causes the liquid 
portions to leach away. An excellent 
plan is to choose a place where the 
soil is of . a clay nature, and dig a 
trench all around the space where the 
pile is to be and in this way save some 
of the liquid, which may be scooped 
up and poured back on the pile. Use 
the pile as a receiver for the slop from 
the house, and see that it is forked 
over several times during the winter. 
Hut the main thing is to see that It is 
protected from the elements as much 
as possible. 

The best of foods do not give the 
best re?ults when fed in excess. Live 
stock and the human family are alike 
in this. We tire of the food we like 
the best if we have too much of it too 
often. It is economy to feed most of 
the feeds produced the cheapest and 
the best fcr the purpose, as corn for 
fattening hogs, but something must be 
fed for variety. The more different 
feeds that can be used in this way the 
better. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 



GombauH's 

Caustic Saisam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Bock, 
Strained" Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bonv tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes all 
Bunches from Horsea or Cattle. 

As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, 5ore Throat, etc., It is invaluable. 

Kvery bottle of Caustic Balsam sold la 
Warranted to trive satibiactlon. Price $1 50 
per bottle. Sold by druff£li*t«, or sent by <■-,- 
press, charges paid, witti full directions for 
Us u«e. tirSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

•The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



January 13 I9t6j 



CASEIN THE NEW PRODUCT. 



One of the by-products of the dairy 
which is less common than some of the 
rest is dry casein, a granular, yellow- 
ish-white substance, derived from the 
casein of milk by a process resembling 
cheese making !n several respects. 

Casein is a vegetable substance which 
is found in both the vegetable and ani- 
mal kingdoms. In the vegetable king- 
dom it is found more or less abundantly 
in the seeds of certain plants. In the 
animal kingdom it is chiefly found in 
milk and constitutes the main part of 
the curd. In the dry form it is used in 
considerable quantities in manufac- 
tured goods, for the arts, in making 
glue for furniture dealers and In a 
number of other ways. It promises to 
be a commercial product cf some im- 
portance. 

The process of manufacturing casein 
is briefly described as fellows: 

The separator milk is run into a 
n-'mber of cheese vats; a "starter" of 
whey, saved from the previous day, is 
added, and the milk is raised to a tem- 
perature of PO degrees F. Hy the t m? 
the milk has been in the vats a couple 
of hours, usually about 11 a m.. a small 
quantity of rennet is added— about IV2 
ounces per 6000-pound vat of milk. 
The renneted milk is cooked for a 
couple of hours to 102 degrees, the curd 
being thoroughly raked meantime. The 
whey is then run off, leaving the casein 
curd in matted cakes. Any frothy stuff 
which may have gathered is rejected, 
and the curd is then pressed, remain'ng 
in the hoops over night. Next morning 
it is removed and ground into pieces, 
varying from powder to bits as big as 
a grain of coin. In this form it is 
taken to the drying room, which is a 
separate apartment, specially designed 
for the purpose. On each side of a 
central passage is a tier of metal pans, 
shelf fashion. Blasts of hot air from 
the pipes along the walls pour over 
the pans, on which the casein is spread. 
The drying requires some four hours, 
after which the product is conveyed to 
the store room floor and bagged.— Farm 
Folks 

Whenever a warm spell comes in the 
winter it can be noticed that more eggs 
are obtained and that as soon as the 
weather becomes cold again the supply 
falls off. This shows that warmth Is a 
factor in the production of eggs. It is 
not necessary to have summer weather. 
It is when the hens escape the extreme 
cold of winter that they begin to lay. 
If the change' of weather make a dif- 
ference in laying, then a warm poultry 
house should also have an influence. 
When poultry must resort to the tree- 
tops, and be exposed to snow, rain, hail 
and wind they can only keep alive, be- 
ing unable to assist the farmer by pro- 
ducing eggs. If you want eggs in win- 
ter, you must provide a good, warm 
house for them, as well as provide pure, 
nourishing food. 

Idle horses can subsist largely on 
good bright straw, as they have ample 
time for mastication and digestion, 
while hard worked animals or those 
which are required to move rapidly can 
make use of only little. It is a nota- 
ble fact that horses are often fed on 
costly hay fur roughage when cheaper 
straw or corn fodder could be used to 
advantage. — Farm Journal. 



VETERINARY 

ADVICE 




FREE 



FOR SALE. 

Fine Span of Black Driving Horses 

\'ERY STYLISH STAND 16-1 AND 10-1'/,; 
' weight 1155 and 1 175; Ave and seven years old; 
well bred and sound. Apply or address 

FRANK WIRE, Davisvllle, Cal. 



WANTED. 

y" ADDLE ANIMAL, 15 HANDS, WEIGHING 
1 from I0C0 to 1050 pounds. Must be sound and 
gentle, with heavy body and short legs: a good 
fast walker, and able to single-foot or rack six 
miles an hour. Address, with description and 
price, S. A., care of Breeder and Sportsman, 86 
Geary Street, San Francisco. 



FOR SALE OR LEASE. 

Two Prince Airlie Stallions. 

PORTOLA 37413, a handsome golden bay. 7 
years old, 16 bands, weighs 1190 lbs. 

MENI.O BOY 37401, a magnificent brown with 
white points, 0j ears old, 16.1 hands, weighs 
1200 lbb. 

These t<vo horses are full brothers being sired 
by Prince Alrlle 28045: he by Guy Wilkes 2: 15)4, 
sire of Fred Khol 2:07J£, Hu Id a 2:08'^, Seymour 
Wilkes 2:08%: first dam Signal by Del Sur 2:24; 
seennd dam Lady Signal 2:35'/, by Signal 33^7. 
Boih of these horses are very fast for the amount 
of worn, being only a few months last year, show- 
ing quarters around :34 and 35. 

For further Information apply to 

P. H. McEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal. 



Dr. s. A. Tuttle, a veterinary sur 
goon of long experience lins writ- 
ten a bonk entitled "Veterinary 
Experience*' on the diseases of 
horses, giving svmptonis flnd 
treatment in plain terms. It is 
fully illustrated with diagrams 
showing tuo skeleton and circu- 
latory and digestive systems with 
preferences that make them plain. 
-Tells how to buy a horse and 
tnnw whether it 19 «ound or not. Every horse owner 
fchou Id have one. It is sent to any one. 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR 

is the only pu a ran teed cure for Colic, Curb, recent 
Shoo Bolls nn i Callous. It locates lameness, relieves 
anil cure* Spavins, Ring Bono, Cockle Joints. Cross* 
Heel, Scratches, Catarrh, etc Send today und pret the 
book free and luformaiiou about Dr. In ■ specifics. 

Turtle's Elixir Co., 52 Beverly St., Boston, Mass. 
Hack & Co., San Francisco and F. V. Braun, Los 
Anjeles, California Agents. 



For Sale 

Inquire of H, R. RAND, Fashion Sta- 
bles, Ellis Street, 

BAT gelding. Five years old, stands 17 
bands, weighs 1200. By St. Whips. 1st clam by 
Duly, 2d dam by Milton Medium. Thoroughly 
broken single or double. A creat actor, a grand 
road horse and warranted SOUND. 

CHESTNUT GKLDING. 8 years old, Ifihands 
high, weighs 120(1 lbs. A grand surry or trap horse. 
Has been driven by a lady in the Park all winter. 
Without a doubt, this is the best family horse in 
the country. Guaranteed Sound. 

One New Side Bar Stivers (of N Y.l Baggy. 

Pneumatic tires. Carmine gear, black body. 

One Side Spring, High Hack, Business or Run- 
About Buggy. 

One New Chicago Road or Breaking Cart. Long 
shafts. Best one in the city. 

One Set New Coach Harness. 

One Set New Surry Harness 

Ten Set New Single Harness. 

Two Sets of Run-about Harness. 

Also Light Road and Track Harness. Some 
Fancy Halters, Pads, Etc. 



The Perfectly Galted Trotting Stallion 

ALTA VELA 2:11 14 

(Reg. No. 22449) 

Sire, ELECTIONEER, sire of 166 in 2:30 and 
grandsire of Major Delmar 1:59J£. 

Dam LOK1TA 2:18y 2 (dam of Alta Vela 2:ll>i 
and Palort 2:24H> by Piedmont 2:17}<f; second 
('am, Lady Lowell (dam of Lady well 2:I6!4 
and Lorita 2:18!4) by St. Clair; third dam, 
Laura, dam of Doc, sire of Occident 2:16% 
Address all communications to BREEDER 

AND SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary St., San Franclsoo. 



FOR SALE-MUST BE SOLO. 

Bay Filly, foaled May 9, 1904, by Alta Vela 2: 11^ 

and out of Grace Lowry by Diablo 2:09!^. 
Chestnut Colt foaled 1902, by Nutwood Wilkes 

2:16^ and out of Lily Langtry.dam of Dudley 

2:14, of Ed. B Young 2:\\ l A, of Lily Direct 

2:2l'A andor Esteile 2:24'4 
Bay Colt, foaled May 31, 1904, by Bonnie Direct 

2:05M and out of Alix B. 2:2154 by Nutwood 

Wilkes 2:l6'/4. 
Bay Filly (thoroughbred), Reg. No 32793 foaled 

May, 1902. by Abalanzar and out of Flam- 

beauette by Flambeau. 
Address all communications to CARLTON W. 
GREKNE. Sixth Floor, Union Trust Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



McKINNEY-SIDNEY FILLY FOR SALE 

I YEARS OLD; SOUND AND A GOOD INDI 
1 vidual. Sired by McKinney; dam by Cjunt 
Valensln's Sidney; second dam by Anderson's 
Abdallah or as he was better known, Paul's 
Abdallah, he bj Rysdyk's Hambletonlan, dam 
by imported Roebuck, grandam by the great 
thoroughbred Henry. I am not prepared io keep 
this mare and will s-ell her right Address Box 
417, Breeder and Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

\ FIVE-YEAR-OLD COLT, 14.2 hands high; 
weighs 900 pounds; bright sorrel In color; 
perfectly sound and can run a quarter of a mile 
In 23 seconds or better. He is one of the most 
beautiful and bsst bred sprinters In the State. 
Suitable for a polo pony. Will sell at a reason- 
able price. Address 

SOL SBOCKLEY, Merced, Cal. 



SURREY HORSE WANTED. 

A HIGH-CLASS HORSE SUITABLE FOR 
'* surrey. Must be over 16 hands high, stylish, 
thoroughly broken for city driving, have good 
action and a good disposition. Give particulars 
where horse can be seen, price, etc. Address 
J, \v , caroot Breeder and Sportsman, 38 Geary 
Street, San Francisco. 



TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISAUEKO AND FULTON 8TS. 
(1408 Fulton Sireet) 

Horses Called Por, Clipped and Delivered 

AT POPULAR PRICES. 
BUSINESS HORSES FOR HIRE. 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Stable near the above corner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving, a 
limited number of first-class horses at reasonable 
rates. Have good location, brand-new stable and 
everything first-class All horses In my oare will 
receive the best of attention. 
Phone: Park 573. T. C. CABIN EY 



Toghill Stud 



(Property of Stephen T. Britten) 



SQUIRE 
OF 

CHESTER 




Blue 
Roan 



THE LATEST IMPORTED ENGLISH HACKNEY 

SQUIRE OF CHESTER 

A few engagements ma.y be booked for high-clfcss, well-bred mares. 

WILLIAM WALKER, Manager, Menlo Park. Cal. 



BONNIE DIRECT (4) 2:05! 



SIRE OF 



BONALET (3) 2:091, World's Record for 3-year-old Pacing Fillies 
BONNIE ME (3), Trial (Trotting) 2 

Season of 1906 at Pleasanton-Fee $100 

WITH RETURN PRIVILEGE. Should horie die or be sold the service fee 
for mares not proving in foal will be returned. 

The facilities for care of mare or mares and foals is unsurpassed. 

C. L. GRIFFITH, Pleasanton, Cal. 

THE HORSES of the celebrated ROSE DALE 
STOCK FARM, belonging t<> t lie late Dr. William 
Kinlaw of Santa Rosa, are being sold at private sale 
by the administratrix of his estate. These comprise 
the well-known stallions, WASHINGTON McKIN- 
NEY and ST. WHIPS, and two three-year-old Stal- 
lions, Oolts, Yearlings and Brood Mares, mostly of 
the McKinney and St. Whips stock. 

Address ANNA L. FIN LAW, Santa Rosa, Cal. 



[Himleggen Hones" 

i-rc not curiosities ty any nieai s. The country is full of th<m. The 
fourth leg is the te ail ri>:ht 1 ut it is not worth anjlliing because of a curb, 
splint, spavin or other l.ke bunch. Y< u can cure the horse of any of these 
aim tuts and pul BBGtbti Found leg tnd« r him ty the use of 

Quinn's Ointment. 



cured 

with Qalnn's Ointment he start cured. Mr. E. P.Bnrke 
otSprin^HeM, Mo., w r te«* as tollows- ,4 I have been 
using Quinn's Ointment torM'viTiil years ami have ef- 
fected many marveli'iis cures; It will go deep t and* 
can >e less pain than any blister I ever used. Thought 
it my duty 1 or the benefit of horses to recommend your 
Ointment. 1 am never without it " This is t lie iren«»rn I 
vi rdlct bv all Who (Cfve Qu>nn's Ointment a trial. For 
curbs, 8t»lirits,spavins, wlndpuffin, and al. bunches it 
is unequaled, PHc© S 1 par bottle at all drugfrlstfl 
or sent by mail. Send for circulars, testimonials, <tc. 

IV. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



distemper Be Mer f tiibsb Diseases. 

GRIPPE 
EPIZOOTIC 
COUGHS, Elc. 

WELLS MEDICINE CO. , Chemists & Germologists, 1 3 Third St., Lafayette, Ind 

U K NEWELL, General Agent for Pacific Coast 510 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 



Not a case of these ailments in horses, sheep or 
dogs that any one cannot promptly cure with 
DK CRAFT'S DISTEMPER & COUGH CURE. 
If your druggist can't supply It. order direct— 50c 
and II— money back If It falls. Send a postal 
todav for our valuable booklet, " Veterinary 
Pointers " It la free. 




FOR EXCHANGE 

(INK GOOD LOOKING SOUND YOUNG 
ROAD HORSK, good actor, thoroughly olty 
broken mid ONE CHESTNUT GELDING 

sound und n good roader; both guaranteed every 
way. I want to trade the above horses for a well 
matched thoroughly broken team something that 
will do to use for park driving. 

Address, H. R. RAND, 

Fashion Stables, San Francisco. 



JACK FOR SALE. 



A 



BLACK JACK WITH LIGHT POINTS; 
large, heavy boned, prompt and a gooa han- 
dler. Is a good foal getter and bis foals are 
excellent Individuals. Price very reasonable for 
prompt sale. Address for further particulars, 
S. B. WRIGHT, Santa Rosa. 



FOR SALE. 

7ET BLACK STALLION: WEIGHT 17BO; 
'' seven years old. Is a blocky built, big booed 
horse and a sure foal getter, and his colts will be 
shown. Price reasonable. For further particu- 
lars apply to otilce of Breeder and Sportsman. 



873-fi80 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1HBELI. Jt SON, Proprietors. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Boarding, Training and Bundling all kinds 
Fanoy Horses. A few Nloe Rigs on hand. Ti r 
any car going to the Chutes. Tel.: West 259 



<&he grccbcv mtfc ^povtexxxan 



[January 13, 19(i; 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALT, Manager. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 y.o. Stallion of 190- 
Champion 3 y.o. Stallion of 1905 

Two-year-old Record 2:15 

Three-year-old Record. .. 2 : 1 2? A 
Trial In a Race 2:10'/, 



WINNER OF HARTFORD FUTURITY (»8f>00) FOR 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 9:19% Is by Expedition 2:15* by Electioneer 125: dam Ban Mot by Erin 2:i4%; 
second dam Faroe 2:29\4 by Hrlnceps 536: third dam Roma by Golddust 150. For breeding, Individu- 
ality and racing qualities he Is unsurpassed. 

Season of 1006 at AGRICULTURAL, PARK, LOS ANGELES, 

where he will serve a limited number of mares. 

USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or money refunded »hould mare 
not prove in foal. A rare chance tb breed good mares to an excep- 
tionally hlgh-olass and highly bred young stallion. For further Information address 

"J. O. OERKITY, 4607 Agricultural Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 



$50 for the Season. 



Tlio MoKinuey Stallion 



KENNETH C. 2:17 



i THREE ' 

1 YEAR 

1 OLD 

( RECORD 




Sired bv McKINNEY: dam MOUNTAIN 

MAID (dam of Tom Carneal by 

Cresco 4908 (sire of Allle Cresco 2:13, etc ); 
next dam by Cloud. 

Will make the Season of 1906 at 

PLEASANT0N, CAL. 

KENNETH C. was one of the fastest of an 
exceptionally good lo of three-year-olds that 
raced in California in 1905. He is a splendid 
Individual, has size, style acd quality, and 
the grandsons and granddaughters of Mr Kin 
ney through Kenneth C. will be equal to any 
in the land. 

Tnrmc * * so f " r tIie Season. 
I Cllllo I SIS for Single Service. 

Address 

S. K TREFRV, Pleasnn on. 



WAYLAND W. 22516. Record 2:12|. 

One of the Leading Sires of 2:10 Performers of 1905. 

Sire of Bolivar 2:06%, leading money earning pacer of season 1905. Sire of 
Morosco g.12, highest class trotter on California circuit in 1904. Wayland W. is 
by Arthur Wilkes 2:2S, dam I.ettic (dam of Wayland W. 2:12%. Welcome 2:10%. 
Maud Singleton 2:2S) by Wayland Forrest. Although Wayland W. has never been 
mated with mares by Electioneer, Director, Nutwood. Sultan, Stamboul, Anteeo or 
any of our great sires, he is the sire of Bolivar 2:0(>V4, Nellie R. 2:10. Arthur W. 
2:11%, Morosco 2:12, John A. 2.12%, Forrest W. 2:14%, Leland W. 2:16. Al Sandy 
- : 1 : i 1 1 . Maud Soars 2:21. linnita Wilkos 2:2«>i. Wayland W. will make the 
Season of 1906 at SANTA ROSA, at McGregor & Hockins' Stables. 

W. C. HELMAN. Owner. 

Terms S40 for the Season. Pasture $".00 per month. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty reoognlie the famous COURT 
Into which for twenty-0 e years carriages have driven. This space of over « quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, ohandellers 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 

WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



J 



lllONK PARK 162 



A. J. MARTIN, rop. 



BOARDING AND LIVERY 



1SQO F'IESIIiIj 

BEST OF ACCOMMODATIONS. 
CALL AND SEE FOR YOURSELF. 



STREET 

BET. LYON AND CENTRAL AVE. 
Hayes St Cars Pass the Door 



THOMPSON'S SALE AND TRAINING STABLES 

PLEAS ANTON RAGE TRACK 

One of the Best Equipped Training Stables in California. 

Owners desiring to have horses handle! anl put In condition for sale or. racing are invited to 
correspond with the unlersigned. 

JA8. THOMPSON, Pleasanton, Cal. 

STALLION OWNER! 

IF You Nx£tj a Stallion Card or Stock Catalogue Compiled and Printed, Stallion Poster, 
Stallion Service Hook, a Cut of If our Horse, a Horse Book of any kind or a Tabulated 
Pedigree, Get It where you can get the CHEAPEST and BEST. 

FOR, SAMI'I.KS AND PRICKS ADDRESS 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO., 358 Dearborn St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mc Kinney, 2!11% 

World's Leading Sire cf Extreme Race Horse Speed. 

FEE, $500.00 

<UFees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No return privilege 
but fee returned if mare fails to produce a foal. Keep, $2. per week. Our 
terms are rigidly adhered to in all cases, and we cannot deviate from them. 

McKinney is now located at the farm, 1 miles from Cuba. 



Mention this journal 
when writing. 



Site i-mpto (Situ iFarma, 



CUBA, 
NEW YORK. 




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Pedigrees 



Tabulated 



OF 



Standard Bred 



AND 



California Trotting Bred 



Giving- Performances of the Get 
of Sires and Dams, etc. 



Thoroughbred Pedigrees 

Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates 



BREEDER & SPORTSMAN 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



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"T PZ O C" MT 0F ALL "ORSE OWNERS 

I W Ln VLIl I AND TRAINERS 

USE AND RECOMMEND 

Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy 

SOLD BY... 

W. A. SAYRE Sacramento, Cal 

R. T. FRAZIER p ue blo, Colo 

J. G. READ & BRO Ogden, Utah 

JUBINVILLE & NANCE Butte, Mont 

A. A. KRAFT CO Spokane, Wash 

A. P. HOSKA HARNESS CO.. . .Tacoma, Wash 
McSORLEY & HENDERSON.... Seattle, Wash 

C. RODDER Stockton, Cal 

WM. E. DETELS Pleasanton, Cal 

W. C. TOPPING San Diego, Cal 

JEPSEN SADDLERY CO Los Angeles, Cal 

C. A. SCHWEITZER Fresno, Cal 

H. THORWALDSON Fresno, Cal 

JNO. A. McKERRON San Francisco, Cal 

JOS. McTIGQE San Francisco, Cal 

BRYDON BROS. HARNESS MFG CO 

Los Angeles, Cal 

JAS. B. CA/1PBELL &CO.. Manufacturers, A 12 W.nadison St., CHICAGO, ILL. 




Pedigrees Tabulated 



and type written ready for framing 
Write for prices. Breeder and 
SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



■ 



January 13, ISHii] 



15 



SHOOT YOUR GAME 



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If you Use It Once, 
You will Use It Again — 
That's what you want! 

Good Shooters Shoot Good Powder. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELES 



SACRAMENTO 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




We Make 16 Qrades, $17 75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Xf Coast Branch, JWL B, BE KEART CO.. 114 Second St., San Francisco 

The Hunter One-Trigger 



Is Absolutely 
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SMITH GUNS SHOOT WELL. 



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BOOKS FOR STALLION OWNERS 

1. Hoover's Stallion Service Record. 

The most complete book for recording stallion service ever placed before breeders. 
[Cot a pocket edition. No more disputing of sires. No more mixing of dams where this 
book is used. There is space for entering too mares, giving their lull breeding, description, 
dates of service, dates ot foaling, etc , with index, complete, si/.e in\7'... Kach hook is 
handsomely and substantially bound $2.00 

•1. The Standard stallion Service Hook. 

The neatest Service Hook published, containing space for entering 100 mares, giving 
Space for full description, pedigree, dale of services and refusals, date of foaling, etc., with 
index complete, neatly bound in leatherine, suitable for pocket use $1.00 

:J. Breeder's Note and Certificate Hook and Stallion Service 
Hook Combined. 

This book contains 75 blank certificates to be given to owners of mares, certifying 
that said maro has been bred to a certain stallion. Also 75 notes suitable for owner of mare 
giving to owner of stallion on account of stallion service fee. This book is well bound, anil 
makes a book liko No. 2, after certificates and notes have been removed $1.00 

ADDRESS 

T3R BEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



MANH'JftS 



RED BALL BRAND. 



Awarded Gold Medal 
At California State 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
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Improves and keeps 
stock In the pink of 
condition. 

rUnhattan Pood Co 

1 253 Folsom St., San Francisco 
Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 



Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

O. P. KERTELL. Manager. 




A GAME GETTER 

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T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points, 
Standard, Care, 
Training Etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The Instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
to other breeds as well as to Cockers, and it Is a 
useful book for the dog owner. Tells how tj 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE BY THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO CAL. 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, CaL 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
tnerctal school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. 



E. P. HEALD. President. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 



(POCKET 8IZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



N. Y. Salesrooms: 32 Warren St, 



30 Cherry St,, Meriden, Conn, 



SHREVE & BARBER CO 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 



Send for 
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Mailorders 
a Specialty 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



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Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

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QOCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

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-DBAI.EHS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Telephone Main IBS 

CALIFORNIA 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
■per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



GREAT DANES. 



riREAT DANE PUPS (BLUEBEARD-MAUD 
VT S.) for sale; eight weeks old. O. BERG- 
STEN, Center-street Station, Oakland. 

GORDON SETTERS. 

"LX>R SALE— PUPPY AND BROKEN DOGS 
*■ T3EO. H STONE. Box 12. Fresno. Cal. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS ' — QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California State Fairs 
1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef and milking 
families for sale. Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Francisco. 

PETER 3 AXE & SON, Liok House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. Hlgh- 
olass breeding stook. Correspondence solicited. 



HOLSTEINS— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at State and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter contest since 1885 in 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F. 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Franclsoo. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DDRHAM8. 
Dairy Stook specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Nlles & Co.. I.os Angeles 
Oal. 



VETERINARY. 



13 1*. w xxx, F*. Egan. 

M. R. O. V. S., F. E. Y. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg 
Veterinary Medical Soolety ; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and AustrallanColonlea 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equina 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-Rresldent oi 
the California State Veterinary Medloal Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Oared In 48 Hoars. 



CAPS ULES 

4/1 



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Superior to Copaiba, Cnpebs or Injection 



16 



[January 13, 1906 



TELEPHONE, 

South 640 




is SI j 



I THE HUNTING 

! 

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U. M. C. Ammunition 



Is Made 
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with this 
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Pacific Coast Depot; 
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i ib [sb dbb psa 1a pas ebb 

outfit | 

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A Remington Shot Gun jj 

J 




WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOG 

86-88 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO E. E. DRAKE, Manager 



JflNCHESm 

^IVLIVETTOVriTIOIVr, RIFLES, SHOTGUNS 



WEBB AWARDED 1HE 



ONLY GRAND PRIZE 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



The Official Records Show 

that at the 
GRAND AMERICAN H \NDICAP, 
Indianapolis, Ind , June 27-30, 

DU PONT SMOKELESS 

WON EVERY ONE 
of the 
EIGHT PRIZES 
(Grand American Handicap, Preliminary 
Handicap, Consolation Handicap, 
the Five Men Slate Team 
Championship) 
and 

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OP THE TOTAL PURSES. 



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When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
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We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



LAFLIN& RAND BRANDS 
in 1905. 

HIGH AMATEUR AVERAGE 
for the Entire Season vl 1905 
was won by 
Mr. J W. Altard. ^airplay, Mo., 
» ho used 

"NEW SCHULTZE" 

and brjke 9J p:r cent of all targets 
shot at In tournaments. 

LAFLIN & RAND BRANDS 

"INFALLIBLE" 
"NEW E. C, (IMPROVED)" 

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also won THREE out of the 
FIRST FOUR BIAS AVERAGES 
for the Season of 1905 

LAFLIN ft RAND FOWUEK CO. 
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■Semd for Cataloju*. 



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FISHING 
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These are the Brands of 



FACTORY ... CUT! i O 
LOADED . . O II LLLw 

PACIFIC 

CHALLENGE 

SUPERIOR 

EXCELSIOR 



[January 20, 19lt> 



$10 Payments Due February 1,1906 

ON YEARLINGS IN 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5-j 7000 Guaranteed 

Nothing More to Pay Before 1907. 

For Foals of Mare9 coverei in 1904. To trot or pica at two and thre3 years old. Entries closed October 15, 1904. Nothing 
More to Pay Before 1907, when your Foal can start in the Two-YearOld Division. Stakes divided as follows: $3250 for 
Trotting Foals, $1750 fo- Pacing Foals, $800 to Nominators of Dams of Winners and $200 for Owners of Stallions. 

A Chance for Those Who Failed to Enter. 

Substitutions. A few of the original nominators of Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes for Foals of 1905 have ad vised 
us that, because of barrenness of the mare or death of the foal, they wish to dispose of their entries. 
If you own one or more whose dams you neglected to name when entries closed, send $22, with Color, Sex and Breeding of 
the Foal, on or before February 1st next, which covers payments to February 1, 1907, and the few substitutions to be dis- 
posed of will be a warded in the order in which remittances are received. Prompt attention will eecure for you this rich 
engagement. 



E. P. HEALD, President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Sec'y, 36 Geary St., S. F. 



iEAD 



RACING! 




New California Jockey ciob 
OAKLAND TRACK 

Six or More Races Each Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE 

RACES COMMENCE AT % p. M. SHARP 

o F o r *? pecIa . 1 Trains stopping at the Track take 
S_ P. Ferry, foot of Market Street-leave at 12 
thereafter every twenty minutes. No smoking in 
last two oars, which are reserved for ladles and 
their escorts 

Returning, trains leave Track after fifth and 
last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 




HAWTHORNE 3:06 1-4 



BILLY lit <JK 3:07 1-4 



KINNEY LOC 2:07 :t 4 



KINNEY LOU 2:07 



PHENOL S0DIQ0E 

hoals 

SORES, CUTS 
and BITES 

ON 

Man and Deast, 

>N Keep Handy for 
Accidents. 

J*r the N^E/ *rw&ce*v 

PHENOL SODiaUl 

Cure* 

W^^^^M^^ MANGE & SCRATCHES 
on Dog*. 




3 THE FASTEST TROTTING SON LteSSBSSEfrsd 

4 OF THE CHAMPION SIRE. 

Will make the Season of 1906, commencing February 1st, ending July 1st, at 



AGRICULTURAL PARK, SAN JOSE, CAL. 

TERMS S10O. $50 due when mare is bred and $50 payable when mare is known to be in foal, 

BUDD DOBLE, San Jose, Cal. 



For farther Information, pedigree and description address 
PHONE: JOHN 2481. 



"^CE BROTHERS & WHITE- 



■- a For Sale 



By All Druggists. 



publication. 



HANCE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA. 



Mc Kinney, 2111% 

vV orld's Leading Sire cf Extreme Race Horse Speed. 

FEE, $500.00 

tJFees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No return privilege, 
but fee returned if mare fails to produce a foal. Keep, $2. per week. Our 
terms arc rigidly adhered to in all cases, and we cannot deviate from them. 

McKinney is now located at the farm, 1 miles from Cuba. 



Mention this journal 
when writing. 



Site Empire Olitit JarntB, 



CUBA, 
NEW YORK. 



McKINNEY DIRECTOR NUTWOOD 

THE STAND ARD-U RED TROTTING STALLION 

TJNIMAK 40936 

By McKinney 2:11}; dam Twenty-Third bv Director 2:17; second dam Nettie 
Nutwood (dam of Hillsdale 2:15}) by Nutwood 600. 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at PALO ALTO, Cal. 

Usual return privileges or money refunded at the option of the owner of the mare. 

Terms, $40 for the Season. & 

To Close June 1st ^ 

Address or apply to CAPT. C. H. WILLIAMS, 

Box 151, PALO ALTO, CAL 

WAYLAND W. 22516. Record 2:12^. 

ONE OF THE LEADING SIRES OF 2:10 PERFORMERS OF 1905. 

-Sire of Bolivar 2:06%, leading money earning pacer of season 1905. Sire of I 
Morosco 2.12. highest class trotter on California circuit in 190*. Wayland W is 
by Arthur Wilkes 2:28. dam I.ettio (dam of Wavland W. ' l'U, Welcome "•10 ii I 
Maud Singleton 2:»8) by Wayland Forrest. Although Waylaid W. has Sever been 
mated with mares by Rlectionoer. I rector. Nutwood. Sultan. Stambonl, Anteeo or ! 
1 1 " 1 , > ;,° f Kreat ., S ^ Ca i u e '? re of "o'ivar 2:06%, Nellie R. 2:10. Arthur W ' 

2:11%. Morosco 2:12, John A. L*. 12%, Forrest W. 2:14>i. Iceland W. 216 Al Sandv 
2:19%, Maud Sears 2:21. Bonita Wilkes 2:2GU- Wayland W. will make the 
Season of 1906 at SANTA ROSA, at McGregor & Hockins' Stables. 

W. C. HELMAN Owner 

Terms $40 for the Season. Fasture $3.00 per month. 



Excellent Pasturage at Reasonable Hates. No 
barbed wire Bast of care taken of Msres, iD 
any manner Owners may desire. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 y.o. Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 y.o. Stallion of 1905 

Two-year-old Record 2:18 

Three-year-old Record.. -• : I '.' , 
Trial in a Race in ' 



WINNER OF HARTFORD FUTURITY (*860O) FOR 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12J£ is by Expedition 2:15* by Electioneer 125; dam Bon Mot by Erin 2:J4V: 
second dam Farce 2:29!< by Princeps 536: third dam Roma by Golddust 150 For breeding, individu- 
ality and racing qualities he is unsurpassed. 

Season of 1906 at AGRICULTURAL PARK. LOS ANGELES, 
where he will serve a limited number of mares. 

$50 fOr the SeaSOn USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or money refunded should mare 
' , ' not prove in foal. A rare chance tb breed good mares to an excep- 

tionally higa-olass and highly bred young stallion. For further information address 

J. O. GERRITY, 4607 Agricultural Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Tho MoKinnoy Stallion 

KENNETH C. 21 7 K) 




Sired by McKINNEY: dam MOUNTAIN 

MAID (dam of Tom Carneal 2:08H) by 
Cresoo 4908 (aire of Allle Cresco 2:13, etc ); 
next dam by Cloud. 

Will make the Season of 1906 at 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

KENNETH C. was one of the fastest of an 
exceptionally good lot of three-year-olds that 
raced in California in 1905. He Is a splendid 
individual, has size, style and quality, and 
the grandsons and granddaughters of McKin- 
ney through Kenneth C. will be equal to any 
in the land. 



Terms 



i 830 for the 8eason. 
i 91 B for Single Service. 



Address 



8. K TREFRY, Pleasnnton. 



Pedigrees Tabulated T^Z" 1 ^. 

Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



January 20 1906J 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIBTOB. 



Turf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICE 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 447. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



Terms -One Tear 83, Six Months 81.75. Three Months 81 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered 
letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, 36 Geary St., San Francisco, 
California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not neoessarlly for publication, but as a private guar- 
antee of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 20, 1906 



California Stake Payments Due in 1906. 



Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes. 

(Payments should be made to F. W. Kelley, secre- 
tary, 36 Geary street, San Francisco.) 

Stake No. 3, $6000, foals of 1903—110 due April 1, 
1906, and starting payment of $50 on three-year-old 
trotters and $35 on three-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No. 4. $6000, foals of 1904— $10 due March 1, 
1906, and starting payment of $35 on two-year-old 
trotters and $25 on two-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No 5, $7000, foals of 1905— $10 due February 
1, 1906. 

Stake No. 6, $7000, foals of 1906— $5 due May 1, 
1906, and $5 due October 1, 1906. 

Stanford Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Stanford Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— $10 due June 
1, 1906, and starting payment of $20 ten days before 
State Fair opens. 

Stanford Stake of 1907, foals of 1904— $10 due June 
I, 1906. 

Occident Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Occident Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— Starting pay- 
ment of $50 due 30 days before the race. 

o 

FROM MAYWOOD STOCK FARM, Indianapolis, 
Indinaa, we have received a very handsome catalogue 
for 1906, and a beautiful reproduction in colors from 
Robert L. Dickey's painting of the farm's premier 
stallion Sidney Dillon, sire of the world's champion 
trotter, Lou Dillon 1 : 5 8 - The catalogue contains the 
pedigrees of the five stallions (Sidney Dillon, Rex 
Americus 2:11%, Sterling McKinney, Prince Tudor, 
and Wait a Moment, besides those of over sixty brood 
mares. Mr. Sterling Holt, proprietor of May wood 
Farm, has certainly made a splendid collect'on of 
stallions and mares to breed champions from. Among 
the matrons on the farm are Earalma, dam of Boral- 
ma 2:07, nd Pn Michael 2:03; Pique, dam of Chain 
Shot 2:06% and three more in the list; Molly O. H. L., 
a sister to Cresceus 2:02%; Hildren, a sister to Early 
Reaper 2:09% and Hive 2:11%, besides many other 
noted mares with records made on the track and in 
the brood mare ranks. Mr. Holt's purchase in Cali- 
fornia recently of twenty-five young colts and fillies 
by Sidney Dillon, and placing them in Millard San- 
ders' hands to train, shows that he is not one of those 
owners who is content to allow the patrons of his 
great horse to expend all the money in the training 
and racing of his get, but that he is ready with his 
own money and enterprise to make Sidney Dillon 
the greatest sire known to the trotting world if such 
a thing is possible. We congratulate Mr. Holt on 
his enterprise and hope he will realize the pleasure 
of being the breeder of several two-minute trotters 
as well as owning the sire of the world's champion. 
Maywood Farm consists of seven hundred and sixty- 
five acres of fine land situated but two miles from 
Indianapolis and is especially adapted for a horse- 
breeding farm. 

o 

RACING CIRCUITS have already been formed by 
Montana associations, which will give ten meetings, 
and the North Pacific Fair Associations, which have 
arranged for seven. Dates have been chosen for both 
these circuits and will be found elsewhere in this 
issue. California, as usual, is behind with her an- 
nouncements, with the exception of the Los Angeles 
association, which has announced a first class meet- 
ing for June, and another at the close of the season 
in the fall. If there is any association outside Los 
Angeles and the State Fair that actually intends to 
give a meeting in 1906 will it please make the intent 



known and state the date that will suit it best. Now 
please, gentlemen, don't all speak at once, as the two 
sudden announcement of a real live California circuit 
might shock the horse owners and trainers so that 
there would be a very large number of deaths result 
from heart failure. 

o 

THOSE WHO .MADE THIRD PAYMENT in 
Rrecdcrs' Futurity No. 5, for the foals of mares bred 
in 1901, and whose marcs failed to have a foal, should 
not forget that the fourth payment in this stake is due 
February 1st. By notifying Secretary Kelley imme- 
diately of the fact that their mares have no living foals, 
owners have an opportunity to sell or transfer their 
nominations to other parlies, and thus get their money 
back. The fourth payment is $10, and after February 
1st will be delinquent and if not paid all previous pay- 
ments will be forfeited. 

KINNEY LOU IN THE LEAD. 



One of the most life-like and best race pictures ever 
made with a camera is the one of Kinney Lou in the 
lead of Billy Buck and Hawthorn, which is shown in 
the new advertisement of Budd Doble's great stallion 
which appears in this issue. The likeness of the 
horse and his famous owner and driver are both ex- 
cellent, and shows them in a position both have main- 
tained in the racing world. Kinney Lou is to make 
the season of 1906 at San Jose. This will be his 
third regular season in the stud. Before Mr. Doble 
purchased and raced him he was bred to a few 
mares, but the season of 1904 was Kinney Lou's first 
advertised stud season,, and since then he has re- 
ceived at court as choice a collection of highly bred 
mares as has been sent to any stallion on the coast. 
That these mares are owned by progressive owners 
who will train and race the produce is evident from 
the fact that in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes 
for mares bred in 1904 and 1905, those bred to Kinney 
Lou are more numerous than the mares bred to any 
other stallion. Such a showing for a comparatively 
young horse shows that the breeders who have pat- 
ronized him have faith in the theory that the fastest 
trotting son of the great McKinney will be a producer 
of early and extreme speed. It is a good theory to 
tie to. Horses cannot transmit qualities which they 
do not possess, and while stallions and mares without 
records have and. may produce record breakers and 
race winners, they doubtless possessed speed and 
stamina, although the fact may not have been known. 
In Kinney Lou's case it is known, however, and he 
has the distinction of being the fastest green stallion 
that ever started in a campaign without a standard 
record. His mark of 2:07% was made in the second 
heat of a winning race in which he met twelve of 
the best trotters on the Grand Circuit. It proved that 
he was possessed not only of great speed but of great 
stamina, and in spite of the fact that he was a sick 
horse, he finished the last inch of each mile as gamely 
and with as much determination to keep in the lead 
as he exhibited at the start. 

Kinney Lou has shown to the world that he is the 
fastest entire trotting son of McKinney. All know 
that McKinney is the greatest son of Alcyone, who 
was in turn the greatest son of George Wilkes, and 
he the greatest of all the many sons of Hambleton- 
ian 10. Here is an unbroken line of greatness. On 
his dam's side he comes from another great line, that 
is strongly endowed with the blood of the Morgan, 
that family of handsome horses, whose representa- 
tives could out pull, out trot, out run and out show 
all the horses at the old New England county fairs. 
Kinney Lou's dam was Mary Lou 2:17, a mare whose 
speed and gameness made her a favorite with every- 
body who witnessed the trotting events on the Cali- 
fornia circuit twelve or fifteen years ago. She was 
the very personification of grit and determination, 
and never gave up the struggle from the time the 
word was given until the wire was reached and 
passed, and no matter how many heats were required 
to finish the race, was always there at the end and 
doing everything within her power to win. Mary 
Lou's dam, Brown Jenny, gave to the world three 
game standard performers and race winners, Ned 
Winslow 2:12%, Shylock 2.15% and Mary Lou 2:17. 
Brown Jenny's blood lines represent the very choic- 
est combination of blood to build the foundation of 
a trotting family on. Her sire was David Hill Jr., 
son of David Hill 857, and a St. Lawrence mare. The 
elder David Hill was a grandson of Black Hawk 5, 
beyond any question one of the greatest of the Mor- 
gans. Brown Jenny's dam was by Black Hawk 767, 
a son of Black Hawk 5, out of a running bred mare. 
So we have in Kinney Lou's dam a combination of 
thoroughbred. Morgan, Geo. M. Patchen Jr. and (Jen. 
Benton, a great brood mare sire. This blood united with 
that of McKinney produced Kinney Lou 2:07%, a 
horse that has not yet reached the limit of his speed, 
but is believed to have the world's stallion record 
within his reach. When it is recalled that Sweet 
Marie 2:04%, the greatest of all race mures, was pro- 
duced by a similar combination of blood — McKinney, 
Morgan and thoroughbred — the potency of it Is evi- 
dent. It produces not only speed, but size, stamina 
and handsome proportions. These are the qualities 
that bring the big prices in the salesrlng and else- 
where in every country under the sun. 

o 

William K. Dickerson, for several years superin- 
tendent of Parkway Farm, Goshen, N. Y., has leased 
the place from the estate of the Hon. John McCarty, 
together with the stallions Joe Patchen 2:01% and 
Fred Kohl 2:07%. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



GEO. NEVINS, S;ockton Race; Track — We cannot 
find either Lady Booth or Susie Hooker registered in 
the American Stud Book, consequently do not think 
your colt can be. 



H. M GARCIA, San Jose — There are more than a 
dozen mares registered under the name of Camilla. 
If you can give the sire and dam of this mare we will 
be able to tell you whether she is registered or not. 



C. B. R., Santa Rosa— Escort is by Guide 2:16. His 
record is 2:23. He is not registered. 



Subscriber. — Menlo Belle, or "Our Belle" is by 
Menio 13028. dam Molly, pedigree not traced. Her 
record is 2:28%, made at Salinas in 1896. She was 
foaled In 1892, and bred by P. L. Nash of Hollister. 
Her name appears in Volume 15 of the Year Book, 
but she is not registered. There is another mare 
called Menlo Belle registered in Volume XIII of the 
American Trotting Register. This mare was bred 
by W. Z. Price of San Mateo, passed to William Oor- 
bett and then to the Santa Rosa Stock Farm. She is 
also by Menlo 13028. but her dam is San Mateo Belle 
by Speculation, second dam Young Lady Vernon by 
David Hill 857, third dam Lady Vernon 2:29%, pedi- 
gree not traced. This Menlo Belle has a record of 
2:30. Unless Westmont by Western is registered and 
the mare by Muldoon registered, the mare you refer 
to could not be. We cannot find that a horse called 
Westmont by Western is registered. 

THE GRAND CIRCUIT FOR 1906. 



The Grand Circuit stewards met at the Hoffman 
House, New York, on Tuesday, January 9, in order to 
arrange the itinerary and assign dates for 1906. Three 
of the six stewards were present, namely, D. J. Cam- 
pan, C. K. G. Billings and James Butler, as well as 
A. H. Moone. secretary Narragansett Park, Provi- 
dence, R. I., who acts as secretary of the Grand Cir- 
cuit. Among the other tracks' representatives on 
hand were C. M. Jewett, of Readville, DeForrest 
Settle, a member of the State Fair Board, Syracuse, 
and A. J. Welch, of the Hartford and Cincinnati 
tracks. 

Cleveland did not apply for dates, but Detroit was 
assigned two weeks at the opening of the Circuit, 
which undoubtedly means that if favorable legislation 
is enacted in Ohio this winter one of the two weeks 
assigned Detroit will be assumed by the Cleveland 
Driving Park Co. It was generally supposed that the 
Albany, N. Y. track would apply for dates but that 
association was not represented. The following are 
the dates assigned: : 

Detroit, Mich, July 23-Aug. 4. 

Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 6-11. 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Aug. 13-18. 

Readville, Mass., Aug. 20-25. 

Providence, R. I., Aug. 27-Sept. 1. 

Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 10-15. 

Columbus, O., Sept. 17-22. 

Cincinnati, O., Sept. 24-29. 

Lexington will follow Cincinnati with its usual two 
weeks meeting, and although not technically a mem- 
ber of the Circuit, its meeting is really a continuation 
of the same. The fact that Mr. Billings was present 
gives occasion to hope that there is still a chance for 
the Memphis Association again being able to give a 
meeting, following that at Lexington. The first con- 
test against the recently enacted anti-betting law was 
a positive victory for the horsemen and it is to be 
hoped that the Supreme Court will sustain the de- 
cision already rendered. 

The plan of having a uniform system of racing 
through the entire Circuit was also discussed, as was 
the selection of a presiding judge and starter. These 
matters were referred to a committee consisting of 
Messrs. Settle, Jewett and Moone for final decision, 
and the latter met again in New York on Monday, 
January 15, and selected Mr. George Hayt for the first 
position. The fact that Readville has applied for the 
usual dates makes it appear as if the difficulties en- 
countered by that association in 1905 by having spec- 
ulation made impossible also seem to be solved. 

The producing stallion William Harold 2:13% is 
offered for sale or lease by his owner, Mr. H. W. 
Meek of San Lorenzo. The Meek estate of 3,000 
acres, of which Mr. Meek has been the manager for 
several years, has been partitioned and divided among 
the heirs, and there will be no more horse breeding 
done on this large estate. Consequently William Hal- 
old is for sale or lease to a responsible party dining 
the coming season. This stallion took his record in 
a race. He is by the great Sidney 2:19% out of 
Cricket 2:10 by Stein way. Cricket was the first mare 
to pace in 2:10, and is one of the great brood mares 
of California, having five in the list, and three more 
that will be given records this year. William Harold 
has had but the most limited opportunities, yet is the 
sire of Janice 2.08%, Dan Burns 2:15, and others, and 
all his get have size, good color and are round bodied, 
nicely turned horses. In any good horse breeding 
community William Harold will attract a good class 
of mares and Ik? a profitable stallion if well man- 
aged. 

Before the knife was used on Clipper 2:06, the fast 
son of Diablo 2:09%, he was bred by his then owner 
and breeder Geo. C. Peterman, and became the sire 
of a fine filly out of an Anteeo Jr. mare. This filly 
has now grown Into a handsome mare, seven years 
old. that Is a sound and high class animal and an 
A 1 roadster. She trots and paces and could be 
trained to go fast at either gait, but her owner has 
no time to devote to this work, so offers her for sale. 
See advertisement. 



(&hc $Yeebev axil* gportammt 



[January 20, 1906 



JOTTINGS. 



GOVERNOR PARDEE has written a letter to the 
Stae Board of Agriculture which has been given to the 
press, in which he severely criticises the past manage- 
ment of the California State Fair and suggests that 
unless a better financial showing is made this year, 
the days of the Fair are doomed. He objects seriously 
to the association again running in debt so soon after 
it had been extricated from its previous indebtedness 
by the State, and states that with the necessary work 
to be done on the State Fair grounds, there is a pros- 
pective indebtedness of $26,283, which will be owing 
by the Society on June 30th, the end of the fiscal 
year. The Governor, however, expresses his willing- 
ness to permit the use of State funds to pay off this 
indebtedness, which he intimates was all created in 
good (if careless) faith, and warns the members of 
the Board that the Fair of 1906 will determine or not 
whether the Legislature will make appropriations for 
another one. He will allow the money aready ap- 
propriated to be expended in paying the bills of the 
Society if there is submitted to him a detailed state- 
ment of the bills now owing, together with a careful 
estimate of the amount necessary to prepare for the 
Fair of 1906 and insure its success, not as simply a 
Fair, but as a State Fair, on the lines -laid down in 
his letter. Governor Pardee's letter is too long for 
reproduction (it would make about two pages of our 
type), but it shows that the State's Governor is fol- 
lowing President Roosevelt's example and trying to 
act in a legislative and judicial capacity as well as 
filling the office of chief executive. That the Cali- 
fornia State Fair has been badly managed in the past 
is known to every taxpayer and citizen of the State 
that has visited it. The main object for which it 
was inaugurated, the encouragement and develop- 
ment of all the State's resources, has been sidetracked 
for the making of an annual two-weeks harvest for a 
lot of bookmakers. To this end, the harness horses 
and all other livestock that are of real value to the 
State have been put in the background and the Fair 
given over principally to the running horses and those 
who lay odds on them in their races. The sale of the 
old grounds and the erection of the splendid new 
property of the Society in 1905 promised a new order 
of thi -s and, although the Society was handicapped 
by Governor Pardee requiring it to be satisfied with 
only a part of the money appropriated by the Legis- 
lature for buildings, etc., it made a vast improvement 
over former Fairs in many respects. The trail of the 
serpent was over it. however, and although several 
members of the Board fought hard to have the So- 
ciety obey the law and allow no bookmaking on the 
races, the syndicate had enough friends at court to 
override all objections and the main portion of th« 
racing program was devoted to cheap runners. An 
enclosure was built immediately adjoining the Fair 
grounds, to which free ingress and egress were ob- 
tained by removing the Society's fence, and in this 
pen the syndicate book was run as usual. It is 
stated on good authority that $8,000 was paid into the 
Society's treasury for this privilege by the syndicate 
and that the entire sum and more was given in 
purses for running races on which the public could 
be induced to bet. One of the big days at the Fair 
was Governor's Day, on which Gov. Pardee and his 
staff were the guests of the Board of Directors. If 
the Governor saw the law of the State being violated 
there and then (and it would be accusing him of 
being totally blind to say that he did not), he had 
the opportunity to make a vast improvement in the 
management of the State Fair by directing that the 
betting ring be closed. He did not do it, but com- 
plimented the Directors in many ways on their man- 
agement of the Fair and their improvement over the 
old methods. 



Now all former Fairs given by the State Agricul- 
tural Society are things of the past. The future wel- 
fare of this important and useful State institution 
is to be looked after, and if California is to have a 
State Fair that is one In reality as well as name, it 
lies within the power of Governor Pardee to start 
it out right this year. The terms of four of the 
Directors of this society have already expired, and 
the terms of three more will end on February 1st. 
This is a majority of the Board Governor Pardee has 
only to select seven men who will see that a Fair is 
given according to law. and the thing will be done. 
Every harness horse owner and breeder who has the 
State's interest at heart will give his support to any 
Board of Directors that will try to make the Fair 
what it should be. The breeders of cattle, sheep, 
hogs, and draft horses, the growers of all sorts of 
agricultural, vlticultural and horticultural products, 
the men who dig from the earth the many valuable 
ores and metals that have made California famous, 
the merchants and the manufacturers, all deserve 
more liberal treatment from the State Agricultural 
Society than they have heretofore received. It is 
neither right nor just to offer but $30 as first premium 
to the person who exhibits a $5,000 bull at the fair, 
and then hang; up ten times that amount for a lot 
of skate runners to race for. Let the premium list be 
revised, the Stat- Fair made as grand an exhibition 
of the State's products as can be got together, and 
then if rightly managed it will pay, and the 
money annually appropriated be one of the best in- 
vestments made by the State. If Governor Pardee can 
reform the State Fair, he will be entitled to the thanks 
of every citizen and taxpayer in California. That 
such a reformation lies within his power there is not 
a particle of doubt. He has the appointment of a 
majority of the Board of Directors within the next 



two weeks. He should certainly be able to find seven 
men in the State of California who will do as he 
wishes in this matter. The lecturing of a Board of 
Directors, the majority of which are about to go out 
of office, will not accomplish as much in the way of 
needed reforms as the simple act of selecting a new 
Board that will devote its time to acting in accordance 
with the wishes and views of the appointing power. 
Whether the California State Fair of 1906 is to be 'a 
decided improvement on the last one" will depend 
upon the men who Governor Pardee shall select to act 
on the Board of Directors. It is now "up to the 
Governor" to find the men who will run a fair on the 
lines he has laid down. 

H. R. WARD, who has been training Daedalion 
2 : 08 for A Ottinger the past two seasons, called at 
the office of the Breeder and Sportsman one day last 
week and told me a number of interesting tilings 
about the Arizona Territorial Fair and race meeting 
held during the last week of 1905. Mr. Ward was one 
of the California trainer who raced at Phoenix and 
says they had a good time and good racing after they 
reached the Arizona capital, though the trip from 
Los Angeles was made a little strenuous by reason 
of a big storm and wash'out which kept them on a 
sidetrack at Yuma for several days. The Phoenix 
Fair Ground he states is the most complete in every 
way of any fair ground in the Pacific Coast district. 
There are two fine tracks, one a mile and the other a 
half mile ring both kept in first class condition and 
very fast. Mr J. C. Adams, president of the associa- 
tion, and Mr. Tiffany, the secretary, are active, hust- 
ling and painstaking officials, who did everything to 
make the visit of the horsemen pleasant. A strange 
feature of the Arizona fair is that while in the city 
of Phoenix everything seemed to be wide open, all 
sorts of gambling games running at all hours of the 
day and night, at the track there was no gambling, 
not even bookmaking or pools of any sort sold on the 
races, and no liquor was permitted to be sold on the 
grounds. The attendance on the poorest day was 
not less than 5000, while on the principal day it was 
estimated that 12 000 persons witnessed the races. 
Of all places in the United States where we would 
expect betting and drinking to be rather prevalent at 
a race meeting, Arizona would naturally be suggested 
first, but the people of that section doubtless thought 
that the tabooing of those things would be a novelty 
and a drawing card, and it worked. 



NEW STOCK FARM AT SANTA ROSA. 



Mr. Ward started Daedalion twice at the meeting, 
getting second money in the race won by Stranger O. 
2:08V4, and fourth in the race in which Hazel Patch, 
Zolock and Custer were the other starters. Being 
asked his opinion about Mr. Adam's gelding Custer 
by Sidney Dillon, Mr. Ward stated that in his opinion 
Custer is a two-minute horse. In the second heat 
of this race, Hazel Patch won in 2:07%. Before the 
start in this heat, the judges announced that Custer, 
who had the fourth position, would trail Ward 
says he did so, and at the half was at least fifty 
yards behind Daedalion, who was third. Custer's 
driver then took his gelding to the outside of the 
track and at the three-quarters he was fully a dis- 
tance behind as he swung around the turn on the 
outside. From that point to the wire Custer finished 
like a whirlwind and was right up close to Hazel 
Patch and Zolock at the wire in 2:07%. Custer will 
doubtless be started on the Grand Circuit next sea- 
son and should nothing befall him in the way of 
accidents or sickness he will surely join the small 
but very select family of extremely fast performers 
sired by Sidney Dillon. 



Up to a week ago last Tuesday, the manager of 
every track in California where a few horses are be- 
ing worked was getting ready to advertise his track 
as possessing every advantage for winter training. 
Uo to that time there had been every evidence of a 
dry winter, and nearly all the tracks were dusty and 
dry. The rain that started falling on that day, how- 
ever, continued during the entire week with few in- 
tervals and the "winter tracks" are fewer than they 
were, while the horses have been kicking the doors 
down in their anxiety to get out and do a few turns 
on the ovals. Road jogging has been resorted to in 
most sections and the using of the tracks given up for 
the time being. There was never a rain that received 
a warmer welcome from everybody than this one. 

!•' i was shi rt in the majority of pastures and all 

sorts of stock had to be fed hay, something very un- 
usual in California at this time of the year. The 
grass is growing very fast, however, and there is 
every prospect of a season of splendid crops in every 
section of the State. 

A correspondent of the Trotter and Pacer says: 
One of the fastest roadsters in Richmond is the bay 
gelding McNey 7 by McZeus 2:13, dam May Blossom 
by Glenmore, son of Marshal Ney. He is owned by 
Dr. H. R. Scott, who purchased him a few months 
back from his breeder, Thomas S. Winn of this 
city. McNey has worked quarters in 33 seconds with 
very little handling and seems good enough to pre- 
pare for the races if Dr. Scott would consent to 
have him trained. McZeus, the sire of McNey, is a 
full brother to the lightning sprinter Coney 2:02, 
and was kept in the stud here for some years, but left 
very few of his get behind. 



Tommy Murphy of New York visited Cleveland a 
few days ago and purchased there, from "Doc" Tan- 
ner and Vance Nuckols, her owners, the stout trotting 
mare Miss Brock 2:. 13%. by Stranger, for a price re- 
ported as $2500. Her new owner is L. M. Borden of 
New York. She will probably be bred to Mr. Bor- 
den's great stallion Locanda 2:02 in the spring and 
then raced and given a lower record by Murphy. 



One of our subscribers at the City of Roses writes: 
Sanla Rosa is to have another stock farm devoted to 
the breeding of high class animals. About one year 
ago Mrs. B E. Miller purchased the Illingsworth 
farm of several hundred acres, paying therefore 
$100,000 and proceeded to stock it with pure bred 
Percherons and Durham cattle. This season she de- 
cided to add harness horses and with that end in 
view has just purchased from the Rosedale Stock 
Farm six brood mares, one filly and one stallion as 
a nucleus for a high grade stable. 

Illingsworth Farm is beautifully situated on the 
Laguna some six miles from Santa Rosa City and 
with its rolling hillside, meadow and living streams, 
is ideally adapted to its owner's purpose. The farm 
will be exclusively controlled by Mrs. Miller and her 
sons who have been engaged in stock raising for 
many years. A track for training purposes will be 
laid out and all the equipment necessary to the breed- 
ing and care of high class animals will be provided. 
The owner will devote attention primarily to carriage 
horses rather than racers, although breeding horses 
adapted to both purposes. As Mrs. Miller has ample 
means and is determined to make a success of the 
venture, there is no doubt that in a few years Illings- 
worth ranch will become well and favorably known 
as the home of well bred carriage and draft horses. 

The horses purchased from the Rosedale Farm are 
as follows: 

Donalell. stallion by Washington McKinney, dam 
Dalia by Daly 2:15. 

Darien. mare by Daly 2:15, dam Signet by Stein- 
way. 

Spry, by Daly 2:15, dam Aggie G. by Ansel 2:20. 
Maearosa, full sister to the last named 
Two mares by St. Whips. 

Brown filly by Daly 2:15, dam Molly by Eugene 
Casserley. 

At the same time J. B. Durand purchased the 
broodmare Aggie G. by Ansel 2:20, he by Electioneer. 
The dam of Aggie G. is Gypsy by Paul's Abdallah. 
Aggie G. is now in foal to Washington McKinney, 
son of the great McKinney out of Lady Washington! 
Aggie G. is a pacing mare and was bred at Palo Alto. 
She has never been given a record but is the dam 
of St. Whips and several standard performers 

SEVEN PLACES TO BE FILLED. 



The terms of four Directors of the California State 
Agricultural Society have expired as follows: 

Benjamin Rush, Feb. 1, 1904; L J. Rose. Jr, Feb 
1. 1904; C. W. Paine, Feb. 1, 1905; E. W. Howard 
Feb. 1, 1905. 

These directors are holding over because they 
proved satisfactory to the Governor, and no successors 
were appointed. 

The terms of other Directors will expire in a fort- 
night, as follows: 

Thomas Fox. Feb. 1, 1906; William Land, Feb. 1, 
1906; James Whitaker, Feb. 1, 1906. 

This will give seven places to be filled at once. 

The other directors who have longer tenure date 
expirations of term of office as follows: 

J. W. Wilson, Feb. 1, 1907; Frank H. Burke. Feb. 1, 
1907; H. A. Jastro, Feb. 1, 1907; G. W. Kingsbury, 
Feb. 1. 1908; H. P. Stabler, Feb. 1, 1909. 

Of the seven Directors whose terms are out or are 
about to expire, all except William Land are under- 
stood to be willing to serve again if requested so to 
do, but it is not yet known what turn the Governor's 
mind may take in this regard. Mr. Land says frankly 
that he has had all that he wants of the trouble and 
worry of trying to make a success of the State Fair, 
and he is willing to retire in favor of some one with 
more enthusiasm to spare. Rumor has it that Mr. 
Whitaker will be reappointed and may be chosen 
President of the Board, though Senator Rush, the 
present President, may again fill that position if he 
cares to retain his place on the Board — Sacramento 
Union. 



MONTANA CIRCUIT ORGANIZED. 



Editor Breeder and Sportsman: As I told you in 
my last letter that there was a possibility of a Mon- 
tana Circuit being formed, I will now make it good 
by telling you the extent of it. At a meeting on 
January 5th an organization known as the Montana 
Racing and Fair Circuit was organized with the fol- 
lowing officers: President, R. D. Steel of Bozeman: 
secretary-treasurer, Dr. A. D. Galbraith of Butte; 
executive committee, W. B. George of Billings, John 
W. Pace of Helena and O. W. Belden of Lewlston. 

The following towns and dates form the circuit: 
July 30, Butte, ten days; August 13, Anaconda, six 
days; August 20, Lewiston, four days; August 27, 
Livingston, four days; September 3, Big Timber, four 
days; September 10, Billings, four days; September 
17, Bozeman, five days; September 24, Great Falls, five 
days; October 1, Helena, five days; October 8, Mis- 
soula, four days; October 15, Kalispell. 

The purses and stakes of the circuit will aggregate 
$120,000 with about ten weeks' racing. A complete 
announcement of early closing stakes will be sent you 
as soon as the different secretaries notify me of the 
classes for which they wish to offer stakes. Every 
town on the list has a good track and first-class ac- 
commodations and Montana expects not only to give 
first-class racing but also plenty of opportunities for 
the betting element. 

A. D. GALBRAITH, Secretary-Treasurer. 



The Iowa State Fair for 1906 will be held in Des 
Moines, August 24 to 31. This puts Iowa as the first 
of the state fairs in the west for the coming year. 
o 

Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet. 



January 20, 19C6] 



THOROUGHBRED DEPARTMENT. 



By Ralph H. Tozer. 

The sires of gallopers from California made a most 
excellent showing on the winning list of 1905. The 
figures are now all in, and Hamburg headed the list 
with $158,160 to the credit of his progeny; Melton was 
second with $147,565, of which Sysonby won $144 990; 
imp. Meddler, third, with $133,701; Sir Dixon fourth, 
with $99,905; imp. Ben Strome fifth, with but $94,035, 
even though his progeny won the largest number of 
races; Hastings sixth, with $S6,263; then comes the 
two Rancho del Paso horses, imp. Watercress and Imp. 
Star Ruby, with $74,274 and $63,830, respectively. 
Other stallions from this State whose get won $10,000 
or more w-ere: Imp. Ormonde (now dead). $50,115; 
imp. Goldfinch. $45,240; imp. Golden Garter. $44,480; 
imp. Brutus, $25,695; imp St. Gatien (sire of imp. 
Meddler), $25,472; Orsini, $23,150; St. Carlo, $22,520; 
imp. Prestonpans, $20,825; Montana (by Ban Fox). 
$20,280; Puryear D., $17,705; imp. Sir Modred, $16,410; 
Maxio, $14,770; imp. Bassetlaw, $14,680; Racine (bred 
here). $13 755; imp. Artillery. $13,720; Eddie Jones, 
$11,765; Indio, $10,625; Rey El Santa Anita, $10,260. 
— i 

In England there was a close fight for honors 
among the "winning stallions," for both first and 
second positions. Isinglass, by Isonomy, finished first 
with £24,642: Gallinule. by Isonomy, second with 
£24.436; St. Frusquin, by St. Simon, was third, with 
£21,733; Cyllene, by Bona Vista, fourth with £21,555; 
then followed Persimmon, by St. Simon. £16,375; 
Florizel II (Persimmon's own brother), £15.549; St, 
Simon (who had the honor of heading the list for 
eight seasons), £ 12,546. Melton's progeny in England 
only won £5,578 Cherry Tree (imp. Matt Byrnes 
when owned in this country by the late Marcus Daly), 
begot eight winners of fourteen races, worth £2,255. 
Of the American bred horses that had representatives 
in England, Kingston's get won £1 673; Octagon's, 
£1,489; Diakkas, £ 1,093; Americus'. £720; Chor- 
ister's, £823, and Dobbins', £729. The get of the im- 
ported horses The Sailor Prince, Watercress and 
Galore won £1675, £1585 and £908. respectively, and 
the New r Zealand celebrities, Carbine and Trenton, 
begot winners of £5,426 and £1,772, respectively. 



Up to and including January 13th, Barney Schrei- 
ber's horses had won $20,915 at Emeryville and Ing'.e- 
side, this being more than twice the sum won by any 
other owner. W. B. Jennings was second with $8,191. 
then follow W. W. Elliott, with $7,484; T. G. Ferguson, 
$6,386; Keene Bros., $6,330, and P. Ryan, $5,010. These 
were the only winners of $5 000 or upward. Radtke, 
who left for New Orleans last Tuesday, headed the 
list of winning jockeys with 53 winning mounts; Mc- 
Bride second with 39 wins, Knapp third with 37, 
Fountain 26, L Willians 20. 



The year 1905 was a great one for the sale of great 
horses at big prices. The last one sold was Diamond 
Jubilee for 30,000 guineas (or $151,250) to the Argen- 
tine breeder, Senor t Correas, this following closely 
the sale of Cyllene. the great young English sire, for 
a similar sum to William Bass. Imp. Watercress 
brought $71 000 at auction in New York last Decem- 
ber, and Hamburg brought $70,000 at auction early 
in the year. 



W. Gabriel, who owned Toupee for Quite a while in 
1905, bid the horse up $1100 and secured him when he 
defeated Cloudlight last Monday at Emeryville — the 
"boost" being from $1900 to $3000. 

;r — ( 

Thomas A. Davies purchased Jim Pendergast from 
Barney Schreiber after the Sain gelding had gotten 
away on the fly and won the second race from a bet- 
ter colt — Capt. Bennett. 



Radtke was allowed to stay the week out, Owner 
Jack Keene deciding to try Red Deaf in the Lissak 
Handicap this afternoon. 



A recent arrival is Ed Sheridan, the popular sport- 
ing editor of the Chicago Tribune. Mr. S. expects to 
spend a couple of months in "the land by the sunset 
sea." 



There is a strong clamor against the present system 
of standing starts, and it is to be hoped the popular 
" walk-up" system used by Mars Cassidy will take the 
place of the undersirable plan now in vogue Just to 
show the need of a change of system I will give a few 
recent vexatious occurrences that could scarcely have 
happened under the walk-up plan: January 9th. In- 
structor, a heavily played horse, off eighth and last 
to a poor start, finished second. January 10th, Marion 
Rose off second flying, in first race, while Native Son, 
away seventh, flat footed, though perhaps a better 
horse, was beaten by two and one-half lengihs; In the 
third race the same day. Grasscutter, played down 
from 5 to 1 to 18 to 5, had little chance to win with 
the send-off she received. January 11th, Ray, the 
heavily played favorite, held at the post by an as- 
sistant starter, finally being beaten a neck by An- 
gelica; that the holding-on at the post cost Ray the 
race there can be little doubt. Ed Sheridan, favorite 
in the next race, was also held, and only won his race 
by a severe effort and unusual display of gameness. 
January 12th, Mafalda, the favorite Radtke up, vir- 
tually left at the post in the second race, finished 
fifth to horses that she can beat off, ordinarily. In 
the fourth race. Forerunner, favorite, off last to a 
rather poor start, finished second. January 13th, Mar- 
ion Rose, favorite In the first race, off fifth to what 
the chartist calls a ' fair start," but not considered by 
very many onlookers as "fair." In the fourth race, 



the Adam Andrew Selling Stake, Bob Ragon, a well- 
played second choice, virtually left at the post, as he 
made up over four lengths in the last half mile, Ragon 
would almost surely have won with an even send-off. 
In the last race of January 13th, Hammeraway had 
little chance to win after getting away ninth and 
Hatfooted, but did finish third. January 15th. Pros- 
perity had no chance to win with the start received in 
the first race, though finishing a good fourth. In the 
second race the sam s afternoon Jim Pendergast, from 
the Schreiber stable, got away flying, and through 
the undue advantage received, managed to stagger in 
a neck before Capt. Bennett, which was much the 
best horse, though he did not win. In the fifth race 
thai day Bird of Passage was off last to a bad start, 
making up ground, but finishing fourth only. These 
comments are made only because I believe the system 
of standing starts used here is wrong, and that 
Starter Holtman could give much betor satisfaction 
under the walk-up plan I have not the faintest doubt. 
Of course, if jockeys would' act fairly and not try to 
'beat the gate," the standing start would be all right, 
and horses would have to be schooled to the tape 
better than they are, or the "hold-on Jimmies" would 
have some excuse for holding heavily-played horses 
until the others were well on. their way. The jockey 
club folks should give the proposed plan a trial any- 
how. If it is any worse or causes more disatisfaction 
than the present system it would indeed be "a pippin." 



Last Tuesday 'Frisco Hoag claimed Fulletta out of 
the fourth race (in which she was favorite) for $825. 
Tarn O'Shanter was bid up from $400 to $700 and 
secured by C. C. McCafferty. Robinson -rode three 
winners, Fountain two and Goodchild one. 



A New Orleans dispatch is as follows: 
"The officials at both local tracks were given a scare 
a few days ago when B. A. Chilson and his colored 
partner, Wilson, of ringing' fame, put in. an appear- 
ance here. The pair have been keeping under cover, 
however, and have not been seen about the tracks 
during the afternoons. About a week ago Wilson ap- 
peared at the old track looking after some mail which 
had been sent him. About the same time Chilson was 
seen, at City Park during the early morning hours, 
and acted in such a suspicious manner that detectives 
were put on his track. He was traced to a cottage 
near the old track. Chilson got wind that he was 
being followed, packed his traps and skipped out of 
town, but it is said that he came back again last 
night. There have been rumors of 'ringers' at both 
tracks this winter, and a close watch is being kept 
to prevent them from going through. It is known that 
the Chilson outfit shipped the mare Useful Lady from 
New York to Charlestown by boat and from Charles- 
town to New Orleans by train. She is here some- 
wnere, but as yet has not been located. 

o 1 

FULLY AS HONEST. 

I have always believed that the impression that has 
prevailed among a certain class of people that to be 
a dealer in horseflesh is proof positive of a lack of 
appreciation of the high standard of moral ethics 
which the same class believes prevails in many other 
walks of life, and after a good many years' exper- 
ience, I have come to the conclusion that the average 
horseman is fully as honest, much more generous, and 
equally as truthful as the average merchant, banker 
or farmer, equally as jealous of his reputation as the 
lawyer, physician, and infinitely superior in each of 
these to the average politician. Horsemen in general 
have the reputation among a certain class of people 
of being ever ready to disguise the fact that the horse 
which they are trying to dispose of is blemished or 
unsound, and yet I think if one of these somewhat 
bigoted and narrow minded critics would take the 
trouble to attend a sale of horses conducted by a 
reputable firm, visit any one of the well known stock 
farms throughout America, or deal directly with the 
owners who are to be met at any first-class trotting 
meeting, he would change his opinion and instead of 
belittling the horse business, would give it prece- 
dence over many of the callings, which he now con- 
siders preferable. The code of laws governing the 
horse business deals more harshly with offenders than 
does that which controls the conduct of insurance 
companies or the many corporations which have come 
into disrepute quite recently. The American republic 
is indeed jealous of its rights as far as the horse 
business is concerned, and eagerly demands that the 
man who has attempted to defraud it In a race should 
meet with the fullest punishment, and yet the public 
calmly and patiently allows itself to be robbed by the 
greedy wolves who infest the great speculative marts 
of this country and rushes confidently into the arms 
of promoters who offer untold wealth from an Invest- 
ment in their industrial enterprises. — Exchange. 

The supreme court of Missouri has declared consti- 
tutional the law passed in that state a year ago 
against "pool-selling." It is expected that the de- 
cision will lead to the Delmar Jockey Club losing Its 
franchise. Governor Folk of Missouri is quoted as 
being In favor of a law permitting racing If it be car- 
ried on in a similar manner to that in New York 
State, and the breeders of the harness horse In Mis- 
souri will aim to secure a law with the aid of the 
Governor. The present anti-pool law was aimed at 
the runners. 

o 

The track being built by R J. Mackenzie, Winni- 
peg. Manitoba, owner of Harold H. 2:03%, etc., Is the 
only track a mile in circumference in the entire Cana- 
dian Northwest. 

Frank Howe, the brother of Murray Howe, died 
week before last at Memphis, from Plight's disease. 



DEFECTS IN HANDICAPPING THE TROTTER. 

(Chicago Horseman.) 
Handicapping the trotter has been more or less 
discussed for several years and practically all the 
critics agree that the present system is far from ideal. 
The fact is forcibly brought to public attention bj 
the record made in Europe the last year by the Amer- 
ican trotting stallion Kirkwood, Jr. This horse was 
purchased at the last Memphis meeting and was Im- 
mediately shipped to Bologne, Italy. Since then he 
has been raced at the important meetings in Italy, 
Germany, Austria and France, and very successfully, 
too, having won nineteen out of thirty races in which 
he started. 

His owner, in a recent letter to John Splan. who 
purchased the horse, says that there is no horse In 
Europe capable of defeating him and he doubts If 
there is one in all America. This of itself is sur- 
prising, as there were not many who had an exalted 
idea of Kirkwood's ability to defeat the American 
bred horses already owned on the European conti- 
nent. The horse proved to be all that the veteran 
American trainer had predicted, "a better horse than 
most people give him credit for being and peculiarly 
well adapted to the European tracks." 

The fact that Kirkwood, Jr., has been so successful 
has not so much to do with the question of handi- 
capping as the fact that has enabled one trotter to 
start In thirty races in one season. The best horses 
in America start nowhere near that number of times. 
If in this country a horse starts at the commence- 
ment of the Grand Circuit and races at every meet- 
ing down the line he has done all that any one would 
expect of him. In fact the majority of the horses in 
training are not able to do this. If the horse is suc- 
cessful it means that he has started ten or a dozen 
times during the season. 

A racing system that allows of a horse startin{ 
thirty times in a season, or twice or thrice as man] 
times as it would be possible for the horse to do ir 
this country, must have elements of merit which 
should not be overlooked. Under present conditions 
campaigning a stable of trotters and pacers is not a 
remunerative pursuit. Even although the horses win 
a goodly percentage of the races the average owner 
will find that instead of being in receipt of money 
from his trainer at the end of the season he really 
has to make out a good sized check for the purpose 
of squaring the account. 

Now if it were possible to race a horse as frequently 
as was Kirkwood, Jr., there would be two or three 
times as many chances to make the campaign a profit- 
able one. Under the present three-in-five system the 
average horse receives work enough which if utilized 
in racing would make a creditable showing before our 
present racing season really commences. The Grand 
Circuit trainers in the middle of last season awoke 
to the fact that the present system kills the horses 
physically and the patience of the average spectator. 
They declared for shorter races, but it is doubtful if 
they accomplish their purpose unless they adopt dif- 
ferent methods. 

The fact that when a good horse reaches the zenith 
of his power he is of no value as a race horse is an- 
other indictment aginast the present system. The 
last season that Dan Patch was trained for the races 
he was good for nothing but an exhibition horse after 
two races. Having won those two events his record 
barred him from all the classes. Major Delmar 
was never so good a horse as when his record was 
such as to render him ineligible to any class event.'. 
Under a proper system of handicapping he should 
have been worth twenty-five thousand dollars as a 
race horse, as it was he was worth just what a rich 
man was willing to pay for him as a fun horse. 
These are but two striking instances of a large num- 
ber. 

Under present conditions the best American trot- 
ters are handicapped out of all class races when at 
their best: the earning capacity of all horses is cur- 
tailed to one-half of their value because of the ina- 
bility of trainers to get them ready for twenty-five 
or th'rty races a year; the system is such that horses 
are too frequently broken down before the racing 
season arrives; the long drawn out contests pro- 
hibits racing from being as popular as it should be. 
These are indictments enough against the present 
system and are so glaring that the best thought in 
the country should seek to remedy existing conditions. 
Owners of horses and secretaries of racing associa- 
tions should seek some mutual ground whereby race 
horses would be made more valuable and racing more 
attractive. 

Frank Work of New York, who has loved driving 
horse's ever since he was a boy in Ohio, and who Is 
now close to the ninety mark, has for more than 
thirty years provided in his will for the disposition of 
his roadsters after he dies, says an exchange. Mr. 
Work has a magnificent stable, with a glass dome in 
the roof, so that his horses may have all the sunlight 
there is going, and .alongside of the main structure 
there Is a ninety-foot covered runway with tanbark 
footing for exercise on winter days when no driving 
Is done. As soon as Mr. Work has tried a horse suf- 
ficiently to know that It will suit him he adds a co- 
dicil to his will, naming the horse and providing that 
In case of his death the animal shall be taken to his 
Long Island farm and given the best of care for the 
balance of Its days, never being harnessed Mr. 
Work never, In the days when his stable was filled 
with champion road horses, Invited anybody to go 
driving with him. "It's no pleasure," he said to me, 
"to have another man In the wagon — I just want 
myself and the horses. I keep a good trotter or two 
for the use of my friends when they call, but the 
horses I drive are for no one else, now or hereafter." 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



6 



[January 20, 19C6 



NOTES AND NEWS. || 



Some of the largest draying firms in San Francisco 
are advertising in the country papers for horses suit- 
able for their business. This shows how scarce heavy 
horses are in California. 



Millard Sanders reached Pleasanton last week with 
two car loads of young Sidney Dillons that Mr. Ster- 
ling R. Holt of Indianapolis had purchased the week 
previous from Santa Rosa parties. Mr. Sanders will 
begin work on them as soon as the weather permits 
and will have them in fine shape to ship east about 
May 1st. 



Kinney Lou 2:07% has led the list of stallions whose 
get were nominated in the Breeders' Futurity for the 
past two years, and is starting out to keep the lead 
another year. Mr. Doble states that more mares 
have been booked tothis great trotter up to this time 
than in any previous season. 



In the article about Bonnie Direct which appeared 
in the Breeder and Sportsman last week, his dam Bon 
Bon by Simmons was not given credit for all that 
is her due. It stated that Bon Bon was the sire of 
Bonnie Direct 2 : Of. and Bonsilene 2:14%, but failed 
to give the fact that she is also the dam of Rector 
2.10%, that took his record in 1905 at the pacing 
gait. This gives Bon Bon three in the 2:15 list. Her 
son Bonnie Steinway actually worked a mile in 2:08% 
and a half in 1:02% last year at Pleasanton, conse- 
quently the statement in the same article that he had 
paced a mile in 2:11% lacked three seconds of being 
a correct one. The writer of the article was present 
when he worked the mile in 2:11% and had forgotten 
about the faster trial. 



Can any of our readers give us the pedigree or any 
other information about a stallion called Red Wings, 
now supposed to be 16 or 18 years old, that was 
shipped from Kentucky about twelve years ago to 
some person in Humboldt county, California. The 
stallion is said to be trotting bred and is a bay with 
black points. Any information that will lead to the 
identification of this horse will be thankfully received. 



The three yearlings by Sidney Dillon sold by Mr. 
S. B. Wright of Santa Rosa to Sterling R. Holt of 
Indianapolis, and now in Millard Sanders' charge at 
Pleasanton. are bred in producing lines. One is a 
bay filly out of the great brood mare Eveline by Nut- 
wood, dam of Ole 2:10%, Roblet 2:12 (dam of Bona- 
let (3) 2:09% ).Tietam 2:19 and Maud Fowler 2:21%, 
another is a bay filly out of Maud Fowler 
by Anteeo, dam of Dumont S. 2:20, Sonoma May 
2:29%, Sonoma Queen (3) 2:26, and Sonoma Girl, trial 
2:15, and the third is a chestnut colt out of the un- 
tried mare Hattie Fowler by Robin 28370, out of 
Maud Fowler 2:21%. These are three royally bred 
youngsters and have been named Eveline Dillon, Maud 
Dillon and Fowler Dillon, respectively. Mr. Wright 
still ownes another Sidney Dillon filly that he calls 
Olive Dillon. This filly was foaled in 1904 and has 
been registered as Sonoma Lady, but he has made 
application for a change of name. She is a large, 
beautifully gaited filly and has trotted a quarter in 
48 seconds. She has been turned out for some time, 
however, and will not be handled for speed until 
fall. 



Peralta, the son of Nutwood Wilkes and Rose Mc- 
Kinney that is now owned by Mr. H. J. Tasker of 
( 'hristchurch. New Zealand, is reported in fine con- 
dition. He is doing stud duty at the present time 
and Is getting some well bred mares. The New Zea- 
landers should not miss the opportunity to breed to 
this grandly bred horse. 



Geers has a green pacing mare in his stable that 
he is counting a great deal on. She is a five-year- 
old by The Earl 2:17 trotting. 2:14% pacing, the fast 
son of Mambrino King now owned by J. N. Compton 
of Augusta, 111., and out of Bessie Hal. the dam of the 
famous unbeaten Direct Hal 2:04%. In her work at 
Memphis she stepped a half in 1:03% some time ago. 
and did it like the real thing. She is so "old fash- 
ioned," both in looks and manners, that the rail- 
birds have dubbed her "Grandma." 



The mare Ronie G., owned by Mr. D. S. Matthews 
of Ryde, foaled January 8th a fine colt sired by Ed- 
ward B., son of Stam B. 2:11%. The colt has been 
named Socoro M. He is 41 inches high and well pro- 
portioned. 



Secretary Gocher announces that a biennial meet- 
ing or congress of members will be held at the Mur- 
ray Hill Hotel, New York, at noon, Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1906, in accordance with Article 7, Section 
I of the by-laws. In accordance with a resolution 
adopted by the congress, the committee on credentials 
will meet at the Murray Hill Hotel, at 9 o'clock a. m., 
on Wednesday, February 14, 1906. to receive creden- 
tials from delegates to the Twenty-third congress of 
members of the National Trotting Association. Any 
proposed changes in the rules should be sent to the 
secretary to be submitted to the rule committee. 



Budd Doble. of San Jose, has just had printed 
through this office a handsome little pamphlet giving 
the extended pedigree of his great trotter, Kinney 
Lou 2:07%, together with some pointers about the 
horse and the family from which he comes. The 
cover contains a very handsome production of Hills 
pictufe, Kinney Lou and his famous owner. 



' In the list printed in the Breeder and Sportsman 
last week of the yearlings entered in the Occident 
Stake of 1908. Henry Halm's filly Alameda was given 
as by Lecco 2:09%. This was an error. The filly, 
which is a bay and very promising, is by Stam B. 
2:11% and is marked very much like her sire. Her 
dam, Henrietta by Boodle 2.12%, is now in foal to 
Lecco, however, and is due some time in March. Hen- 
rietta is a well bred mare, being by Boodle out of 
Flora H, dam of Thompson 2:14% and Bonetti, trial 
2:18%, by Jim Mulvenna 2:19, third dam Thomas 
mare by Bonner, son of Hambletonian 725, fourth dam 
La Belle by Bellfounder 62, fifth dam Ida Belle by 
Leather Stocking, thoroughbred. 



At a Chicago auction sale recently Walter Cum- 
mings of Denver purchased the seven-year-old bay 
gelding Bonner 2:11% by Jayhawker 2:14%, dam Lida 
Stevens by Speed for $900. 



E. T. Barnett, a millionaire mine owner of Fair- 
banks, Alaska, has purchased the noted Woodlawn 
farm in Kentucky and the place will be operated by 
him as a breeding establishment for trotters. The 
farm contains 300 acres and brought $62,000. 



The Colorado pacing stallion Winfield Stratton 
2:05% has been sold by George H. Estabrook to 
James Walker of Coldwater, Mich., acting for Euro- 
pean purchasers, who intend to race the horse and 
then retire him to the stud. Stratton has had several 
campaigns in Colorado and over the grand circuit, his 
mark of 2:05% having been made during the year 
just closed. 



Reports from everywhere outside this state indi- 
cate that 1906 will be a banner year for light-har- 
ness horse racing. It should be the same in Cali- 
fo rnia. 



Tom Sharkey of New York has sent his handsome 
five-year-old black stallion Kingthorpe by May King 
out of Crucible by Onward to Charles Longbotham's 
farm, Chester, Pa., to be trained for next season's 
races. 



The ailing leg of the gray warrior Dr. Strong 
2.05% has been fired by Dr. M. W. Sprengle of Cleve- 
land, O. The son of Strong Boy 2:11% is now in 
winter quarters at Locust Grove Farm, Newcastle, Pa. 



The skeleton of Lord Russell, full brother to Maud 
S. 2:08%, will be mounted and placed in the museum 
of the Ohio State University at Columbus. 



Secretary E. W. Randall has issued a report of the 
financial statement of the Minnesota State Agri- 
cultural Society for 1905. It is vouched by the board 
of audit and shows the society to be in an unprece- 
dentedly prosperous condition The receipts from all 
sources were $241,574.89, and disbursements $166,- 
297.24, leaving a balance on hand of $75,277.65. against 
$48,680.10 on hand December 10, 1904. The ticket 
sales for the state fair of 1905 amounted to $134,- 
736.85, and there was paid out in speed purses $22,- 
720.75, receipts from entries, stall rent, etc , being 
$19,828.90. We also note there was expended in per- 
manent improvements and repairs $32,967.55, of which 
the tracks got a good share. With the handsome bal- 
ance on hand, the society is well prepared for added 
speed attractions for the state fair of 1906. 



From all that can be learned, managers of the cir- 
cuit tracks are lending an ear to the demand for 
richer purses for the fast record horses, says an east- 
ern writer. In the past the trotters with records of 
2:08 or better have had to race for the ordinary 
purse, as have the pacers in the 2:07 list, while green 
and slow record steeds have had unlimited opportu- 
nities to race for $5000 and $10,000 prizes. A $5000 
purse for a 2:05 or a 2:06 pace all the way down the 
line would furnish a series of turf battles the like 
of which has never been seen, and which would fill 
every grandstand on the circuit. The fast trotters 
should be looked after as well. There are now 
enough of these fast record horses to make rich early 
closing events for them as profitable for the associa- 
tion from an entrance money point of view as those 
of the slower classes. 

Arizona parties have bought of Charley Dean, Pal- 
atine, 111., the chestnut stallion Allerton Boy 2:22%, 
for $1500. 

The Montana boarding stable in Seattle was burned 
on Christmas day, destroying thirty head of horses. 



Jack Crabtree, who owns Nutboy 2.15% and Jennie 
Scott 2:14%, is a brother of the famous actress, 
Lotta. 



During the last season three pacers out of the 
same dam entered the 2:15 list — something that is un- 
precedented. The three are Regina 2:10%, Judex 
2:10%, and King Claire 2:13%, the first named being 
the pacer Red Wing C. 2:13%, and the latter by the 
trotter Redwood 2:21%. The dam of the trio is the 
former well known performer, Nelly O. 2:13%. by 
Bald Chief Jr., out of Bernice by Hailstorm. When 
it is recollected that the first mare to have two of her 
produce enter the 2:10 list in one season is Emma T., 
by Socrates, dam of Miss Abdell 2:09%, and Emma 
Brook 2:09%, the value of developed mares as ma- 
trons is again strongly emphasized. All three of 
Nelly O.'s performers made their records in races, and 
two of them did so over half-mile tracks. 

1— 

The Montana Circuit has been organized and will 
consist of ten weeks racing, opening July 30th at 
Butte and closing October 8th at Kalispell. Good sized 
purses will be offered both harness horses and run- 
ners. 



California horse dealers are making frequent visits 
to Oregon these days in search of horses that will do 
for express and farm work. There is i big demand 
for pairs suitable for work in the vineyards and or- 
chards. 



The Rural Spirit advocates a winter track for Ore- 
gon and expresses the opinion that there are several 
locations near Portland that would make splendid 
training grounds. The Rural Spirit is right. If a 
sandy clay or sediment soil can be found, the proper 
construction of the track will do the rest. Perfect 
drainage will make good winter tracks out of many 
that are now thought to be unfit to work horses on 
during the rainy season. There is no reason why 
good winter tracks should not be built in Oregon, and 
if they were the number of horses in training there 
would be greatly increased to the great benefit of the 
horse business. 



Nearly every large city in America is having diffi- 
culty in obtaining horses suitable for its fire depart- 
ment. The prices for good engine and truck horses 
have been raised considerably during the past few- 
years, but the demand is still greater than the supply. 
Here In San Francisco at the present time there are 
so many disabled and aged horses in the fire depart- 
ment that something must be done to relieve the con- 
dition. An appropriation is to be made to purchase 
a number of suitable horses, but they will not be 
readily obtained at the present prices. 



L. B. Clement notes in his correspondence to Col- 
man's Rural World, the death at his home in Illinois 
of F. J. Grigsby. Mr. Grigsby was a breeder of live 
stock and at one time owned the California bred horse 
Callaway, by Sterling, out of a mare by Bay Rose. 
This stallion was used as a saddle horse sire with con- 
siderable success. He was purchased in this State by 
Mr. Grigsby. 



As a sire of producing dams, Nutwood 2:18%, 
keeps far in the lead of all other sires. His daughters 
have produced 268 standard performers, as against 
191 produced by the daughters of George Wilkes, his 
nearest competitor. When it comes to producing ex- 
treme speed Nutwood's daughters are still in the lead, 
as they have 53 in the 2:15 list. The daughters of 
Red Wilkes comes next with 37 to their credit. 



The Indian Territory is just beginning to find out 
what good things she has 1 , and how many different 
kinds of them. A colored man dow-n there the other 
day sold to an Indiana man for $3500 the horse Red 
Ash, which was given to him when a colt because its 
white owner did not know the qualities of the young- 
ster. While still in. the possession of its dusky owner. 
Red Ash did the mile in 2:16 at Checotah, and has 
since lowered the time to 2:11. which is expected to 
come still lower to 2:05. And the Territory in its de- 
velopment is keeping up with the pace set by the 
horse. 



Mr. W. J. Carter, of Richmond, Va., has been chosen 
as a member of the rules committee for the coming 
congress of the National Trotting Assoication, which 
will convene in New York next month. Mr. Carter is 
reported to be a well posted and well informed man 
on trotting legislation, and will, no doubt, prove a 
valuable member of the committee. 



The New York Road Drivers have elected the fol- 
lowing for the year: President, H. D. Gill: Vice-Pres- 
ident, Walter M. Jermyn: Second Vice-President, N. 
L. Ely; Third Vice-President, George A. Coleman; 
Secretary, W. J. Clark; Treasurer, L. W. Boynton. 
Before the meeting was over the following offered 
cups to be competed for during the season: Miss 
Morosini, W. M. Jermyn, George Huber, E. J. La 
Place, and C. S. Rice. Cups will also be offered by the 
Executive Committee and the Board of Governors. 



Judge Hart of the Davidson County Criminal Court 
sitting at Nashville, Tenn., has declared the Tennessee 
anti-betting law unconstitutional. William H. Hayes 
and William Gerst, Jr., were indicted under the Rice- 
Lighon law and on trial their counsel moved to quash 
the indictments. It took Judge Hart just one minute 
to render his decision which follows: "I sustain the 
motion to quash the indictments against the defend- 
ants. The law conflicts with the constitution of the 
State of Tennessee and is therefore void." 



Ml. H. Tichenor & Co. are building a new stable in 
Chicago that will stable 250 head. They will open the 
new building with a big sale of high-grade heavy 
harness horses in April. 



Barney Simpson will stand his fast stallion Arner 
2:17%, own brother to Diablo 2:09%, Don Derby 
2:04%, Demonio 2:11%, etc., at Chico again this year. 
Arner's colts are fine individuals and very promising. 
The opportunity Butte county breeders have to breed 
their mares to such a high-class horse as Arner 
shoulJ not be neglected. 

That good mare Lottie Loraine 2:05% died of colic 
recently at Harrodsburg, Ky. She was owned by C. 
T. Worthington, and was with foal by Oratorio 2:13. 
Lottie Loraine was a bay mare, foaled 1890, by Gam- 
betta Wilkes 2:19%, dam Lady Yeiser by Garrard 
Chief, grandam Jewell by Vermont, and was bred by 
G. & C. P. Cecil, Danville, Ky. She made her record 
in 1897. 



There is a prospect that criminal proceedings may 
be brought against J. W. Brothers and Geo. E. Whit- 
ney, the Des Moines, la., men caught ringing Cuprum 
2:13%. It is a penitentiary offense to ring a horse 
in Iowa, and it is understood a charge will be brought 
against Brothers and Whitney by the Iowa authori- 
ties. 



January 20, 19* 6 



1 



HOW THE FAST ONES ARE SHOD. 



A table of unusual interest showing the style of 
shoe, weight, etc., which the famous trotters and 
pacers have carried, was recently given by a well 
known horseshoer, C. A. Cole, in the Horseshoers' 
Journal. It is as follows: 

Trotters. 





Front weight 


Hind 






and style. 


weight. 


Major Delmar 1:59%. 




open shoe. 


3% 


oz. 


Sweet Marie 2:04%.. 


, , . 9 


bar shoe. 


5% 


oz. 


Dr. Strong 2:05% 


. , 8 


bar shoe. 


5% 


oz. 


McKinlev 2:06 


6 


open shoe. 


5 


oz. 


Wentworth 2:04% 




bar shoe. 


4 


oz. 


Sadie. Mac 2:0614 




bar shoe. 


3 


02. 


Norman B. 2:06% 


9 


bar shoe. 


4 


oz. 


Redlac 2:07% 


8% 


open shoe. 


4% 


oz. 






open shoe. 


4 


oz. 


Robert Mc 2:08% 




open shoe. 


3% 


oz. 


Mainsheet 2:08% 


8 


bar shoe. 


3 


oz. 






bar shoe. 


3% 


oz. 


Marion Wilkes 2:08%. 


8 


open shoe. 


4 


oz. 


John Taylor 2:08% 


, , ,10 


bar shoe. 


4% 


oz. 


Jim Fenton 2:09 


9 


bar shoe. 


5% 


oz. 






bar shoe. 


2% 


oz. 


Helen Norte 2:09% 


6 


bar shoe. 


2% 


oz. 


Miss Adbell (3) 2:09% 


8% 


bar shoe. 


2% 


oz. 




Pacers. 








Prince Alert 1:59%... 


7 


bar shoe. 


4 


oz. 






bar shoe. 


3% 


oz. 






bar shoe. 


3% 


oz. 


Nathan Strauss 2:03% 




open shoe. 


4% 


oz. 


Morning Star 2:04% 




open shoe. 


3% 


oz. 


Laconda 2:02 


4% 


bar shoe. 


3 


oz. 


Nervolo 2:04 


6% 


bar shoe. 


4% 


oz. 


Major C. 2:04 




bar shoe. 


4% 


oz. 


Belle Mac 2:04% 


4% 


open shoe. 


3% 


oz. 


Frank Yoakum 2:04%, 


4% 


bar shoe. 


3 


oz. 


Sphinx S. 2:05% 


8% 


open shoe. 


5% 


oz. 


Allerson 2:05% 


8 


open shoe. 


4 


oz. 


McKinley 2:05% 


7 


bar shoe. 


4% 


oz. 


Joe Pointer 2:05% 


6 


open shoe. 


3% 


oz. 


Stein 2:06 


6 


open shoe. 


5% 


oz. 


Cascade 2:05% 


5% 


bar shoe. 


4 


oz. 


Albert 2:04% 


5% 


bar shoe. 


4 


oz. 






open shoe. 


4 


oz. 


Sufrete 2:06 


5 


open shoe. 


4 


oz. 


Edwin C. 2:07 


6 


open shoe. 


4 


oz. 



Some of the comments Mr. Cole makes on shoeing 
trotters and pacers are quite as interesting as his 
table of shoes. From them the following excerpts 
are taken: 



"In all my experience I don't know as I have ever 
shod two horses the same way. You know, what will 
suit one will not suit another — so many different 
things come up in shoeing horses that are not going 
right. You must find the cause and then try and 
remedy it. 

"A lot of people believe in long toes — they are 
another kind of horses that don't last long. A long 
pastern horse wants a fair foot, and the lighter the 
shoe the better for the horse, and you will find they 
will go farther; the thinner the shoe the lighter the 
footfall, and it takes away concussion. 

"Two things must be strenuously insisted upon for 
the shoe; one is, that the shoe be as light as pos- 
sible, and the other is that it be made or molded 
on its foot bearing surface to an exact counterpart 
of the hoof to which it is applied. Bearing in mind 
that the ordinal and legitimate design of the shoe 
is for the preservation and defense of the hoof from 
undue wear, we should not misconceive this purpose 
by attaching to our horses' feet any uncalled for 
weight. Light shoes proportioned to the weight of 
the animal and the nature of his work are infinitely 
preferable to heavy ones, for these latter are a burden 
at best and a constant tax on the energies of a 
horse, as is meaningly implied by the familiar say- 
ing, 'An ounce at the toe means a pound at the 
withers.' 

"There may be differences of opinion among author- 
ities as to minor details in shoeing, but there is one 
practice not open to argument, and which all alike 
severely condemn, and that is the utterly senseless 
and atrocious custom so characteristic of many of 
every day horse shoers of thinning out the sole and 
trimming or mutilating the frog. No man has ever 
been able to assign a reason for acting contrary to 
the first principles of his own work by destroying 
that which he should aim to preserve, and yet this 
has been and is the most frequent procedure of so 
called farriers in their treatment of the frog and 
sole. They persist with an obstinacy which sets 
common sense at defiance in paring and hollowing 
out the sole even to the quick, and to forming an 
exact 'fine frog,' regardless of consequences, though 
these are of the most serious nature, and affect the 
vitals of the living animal. 

"The pacer Morning Star, the largest money win- 
ner in 1904, wore in front a three calk shoe of seven 
ounces, with a hoof angle of 48 degrees, and a 3% 
toe, and behind a 3% ounce hoof, angle of 52 de- 
grees — toe 3%. 

"Sweet Marie wore a nine ounce plain, square toe 
bar shoe, with 3% toe, and at an angle of 48 degrees 
in front; and behind a 5% ounce square tie swedge 
shoe, with heel calks and 3% toe and angle of 52 
degrees. 

"Sadie Mac, one of the greatest trotters the world 
ever saw, was different from most horses. As a rule, 
they have their off days, but she always had her 
speed, and never made but two breaks in her life — 
she made a break at Boston and did not know what 
to do. She wore a seven ounce swedge bar shoe, 
with square toe and a little heel calk to take the Jar 
off, in front 3% toe and angle of 47% degrees, and 
a three ounce hind shoe, swedged with a 3% toe and 
an angle of 52 degrees. The outside of her hind shoes 
was 1% inches longer than the inside. This was the 
only way to keep her from speed cutting." 



LIKE PRODUCES LIKE. 

Breeders of the light harness horse have had many 
valuable lessons during the past few years which are 
likely to result in a very radical change from the 
methods by which the American trotter has been bred 
in the past. Only a few years ago a visit to any one 
of the great breeding farms in this country would 
show that little or no attention was paid to individ- 
uality, especially as regarded the brood mares on the 
place, and in many instances the leading stallions 
would be found not only to be without a record and 
without the ability to get one, but also from an an- 
cestry in which there were few, if any, public per- 
formers. It was not in the least uncommon twenty 
years ago to find a breeder's' ambitions centered in a 
stallion unknown on the trotting courses of this coun- 
try, and whose every ancestor, paternal and maternal, 
were alike without reputation in this respect. 

Twenty years ago the so-called "development" 
theory attracted very little attention, and the breed- 
ers of those days scoffed at the idea that the easiest 
and surest way to breed race horses was by using 
only those animals who had distinguished themselves 
in this particular. A record of 2:30 made against time 
was deemed sufficient evidence that the holder pos- 
sessed speed enough to make him valuable for breed- 
ing purposes, and even if the stallion was unable to 
trot a mile in three minutes, his limitations were not 
regarded as a bar to future stud honors. It is prob- 
ably safe to say that 90 per cent of the stallions doing 
service at that period were incapable of trotting 
faster than the average road horse of to-day, yet the 
breeders never once thought of the effect this lack of 
capacity must have on posterity. Fortunately, as Is 
always the case in the reproduction of animal life, 
the fittest survived, and the great race horses of their 
day accomplished so much more in the stud than did 
their contemporaries who were lacking in speed and 
racing ability, that the thoughtful students of breed- 
ing and the practical horsemen awakened to the re- 
alization that a well-bred, well-formed, high class 
race horse was much more likely to reproduce him- 
self and sire horses of great capacity than those 
with nothing to transmit of their own and dependent 
on their blood lines, their inheritance, to overcome 
their own failings. 

George Wilkes, the mightiest stallion of his day and 
the one whose speed compared favorably with the 
fleetest stallions of this generation, after a series of 
campaigns that would have ruined any but the sound- 
est of constitutions, was retired to the stud in Ken- 
tucky with conditions decidedly against him. His 
success was more pronounced than that of any other 
stallion of his time, and in fact was never approached 
by any other stallion in this country, for, in addition 
to having given to the world several of the highest 
class trotters of their day, he became through his 
descendants the founder of the greatest trotting fam- 
ily in the register.. Yet the fact that George Wilkes 
was a very great race horse and an equally great sire 
did not convince all the men engaged in breeding 
the light harness horse that the two had any con- 
nection with each other; they did not see any logic 
in the argument that because he was a great race 
horse, possessed of marvelous speed, he should be any 
more likely to become a success in the stud than had 
he lacked his great qualities. 

To-day breeders are of a different opinion and few 
indeed are they who would select a sallion of no rac ing 
ability, in preference to one who had demonstrated 
his worth, with which to begin the foundation of a 
breeding farm. Owners of valuable mares to-day 
seek the fastest and gamest race horses, fully aware 
of the fact that the best is none too good; that, even 
with every law of heredity obeyed as nearly as pos- 
sible, the chances of failure are greater than those 
of success, and that unless they use mares and stal- 
lions rich in trotting inheritance, full of producing 
blood, individuality as nearly perfect as possible, 
and withal possessed of demonstrated racing ability, 
they will find themselves groping in the dark, and can 
only hope to accomplish' anything as the result of an 
accident. It has been clearly shown that the great 
colt trotters of thi» day, the ones whose speed was 
natural and whose ability to race was shown at an 
early age, became the great sires of succeeding gener- 
ations', and that the breeder who discards from his 
stud an animal, no matter how well bred, who is 
totally lacking in speed, is wiser than he who under- 
takes to produce great race horses from animals who 
have nothing to transmit. 

The Futurity winners, and, in fact, the winners of 
most of the classic events of to-day are by stallions 
who were themselves possesed of some degree of 
racing ability. Miss Adbell, last years' Futurity win- 
ner, is by a stallion who is in some respects the most 
wonderful colt trotter ever foaled; Lightsome, the 
crack two-year-old trotter of the year, is by Con- 
stantine, gamest and greatest trotter of his day; 
Ethel's Pride, the victor in this year's Transylvania, 
is by Directum, the peer of any trotting stallion the 
world has ever seen; Angle, this year's M. & M. win- 
ner, Is by Axtell, the greatest colt trotter ever seen 
up to his time, and excelled by few since; Sadie Mac, 
probably the greatest race mare of her division and 
one of the best of all time, was by a Futurity win- 
ner, a stallion equal to the best or his or any other 
period; Sweet Marie, the champion of the all-aged di- 
vision, is by McKinney, who was in the days of his 
racing career a tremendously high class horse. The 
history of the past clearly proves that the surest way 
to breed race horses is to breed to stallions who were 
possessed of great ability in this respect. A trotting 
failure is more than likely to reproduce himself; so is 
a gre!at race horse— A. G. Leonard in Kentucky Farm 
and Breeder. 

Strike — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 
when you ask for It. 



FAIR DATES CLAIMED. 

At the meeting of the North Pacilic Fair Assoclffi 
tion held last week at Portland, the following dates 
were agreed upon: 

Seattle . Sept. 3 to 8 

Salem sept. 10 to 15 

North Yakima Sept. 17 to 22 

Spokaiio ...Sept. 24 to 29 

Walla Walla Oct. 1 to 6 

Lewiston Oct. 8 to 13 

Everett was given the privilege to select such dates 
as they may decide on. 

o 

DRAFTERS IN BIG DEMAND. 



The Breeders' Gazette of Chicago says: Very high 
prices and a most active demand have characterized 
the horse market in the initial days of 1906. Desire 
to buy high class draft horses has been almost fever- 
ish in its intensity and last week a three-year-old 
grade Percheron gelding shipped in from Iowa sold at 
auction in Chicago for $320. It is announced that this 
precocious youngster pulled up 2020 pounds on the 
scale beam. Of course he was marketed far too 
young, at least two years before his proper time, and 
he is not fit to go into active use on city streets, 
no matter how well developed he may be nor how 
large. With his immaturity and his year of dentition 
troubles before him it looks as though a tremendous 
price had been paid for him, but that if he goes on 
as he promises he will sell for a very long price when 
he is a five-year-old. However, the payment of such 
a tremendous price for a colt that must be called 
virtually a feeder merely explains the lengths to 
which buyers will go to provide themselves with good 
draft material for use in the great cities. A very 
easily obtained price indeed is $250, and that that and 
still longer prices are not oftener paid is simply be- 
cause the animals good enough to command them are 
not presented in large numbers. It is rare that a 
gelding commands such a price without being of high 
grade in breeding, that is. possessing several crosses 
of pure blood. Why, then, will it not pay farmers to 
go to the fountain head at once and buy the cheaper 
grade of pure-bred mares for the sole purpose of 
breeding geldings from them? In certain breeds, in 
fact in all breeds, mares may be procured for prices 
ranging from $250 to $400. and what would pay bet- 
ter than the mating of these with really good stal- 
lions, the emasculation of the males and their sale as 
geldings when well advanced toward maturity? Like 
hot cakes on a cold winter's day would be but a 
poor illustration of the way the resulting geldings 
would sell if it was known where they were to be 
had. 

o 

JAPANESE HORSES. 



From the report of an American Consul in Japan 
it is learned that the Japanese horse is an undersized 
animal, not weighing over 900 or 1,000 pounds, stands 
under 14 hands high, and is entirely inadequate to 
the demands made upon him. It is no uncommon 
sight to see a small horse hitched to the ordinary 
Japanese four-wheeled dray, pulling with evident 
effort a load consisting of four or five bales of cotton, 
each weighing 500 pounds or over. This heavy strain 
is evident in the sprung hock joints and generally 
stiffened condition of comparatively young horses. 
Stallions and mares are commonly used for draft 
purposes, while geldings are seldom ever seen. The 
Japanese dray weighs about 900 to 1,200 pounds, and 
has small front wheels measuring about 15 inches in 
diameter with rear wheels nearly 40 inches in height. 
The pull of the load comes from a height of seven or 
eight inches from the ground, is indirect and neces- 
sitates greater effort than would be the case if it 
were made more direct. 

The government has been engaged for some years 
past in the improvement of the quality of the Japan- 
ese horse and has recently imported from England 
thirty-three horses, including sixteen thoroughbreds, 
ten trotters, six hackneys and one saddle' horse. These 
have been distributed to t ho various stud farms, situ- 
ated in different parts of the empire. Many of the 
Dest horses purchased for the army have been dis- 
tributed to the government farms for stud purposes. 
Quite a number have also been purchased in the 
United States. 

There is a scarcity of horses in Japan, as all ser- 
viceable animals were commanded by the authorities, 
and farmers and others have been put to much in- 
convenience. A good opportunity for the introduction 
of horses suitable for draft and farm purposes is now 
presented, and American breeders should avail them- 
selves of it by sending representatives to Japan to 
acquaint the authorities with their stock. 

TWO CALIFORNIA BRED STALLIONS DEAD. 

The last mail from New Zealand brought the news 
that the two California bred trotting stallions, Wild- 
wood and Electioneer, recently died there. 

Wildwood was bred at the Palo Alto Stock Farm 
and was sent to New Zealand in 1894. He was by 
Good Gift, the stallion presented to the Czar of Russia 
by Senator Stanford, and was out of Amulet by FaJIfe, 
He had a four-year-iold record of 2:24 2-5 and a two- 
mile record of 4:55. In the Colonies he sired Rib- 
bonwood 2:09, the champion harness horse of Aus- 
tralasia, and several other good winners. 

Electioneer was bred at Rancho del Paso and was 
by Albert W. 2:20 (son of Electioneer 125) .out of 
Silica by Algona, second dam Galena by Nutwood. 
He won several Important races after reaching the 
Antipodes, and in the stud sired Elector 2:18, The 
Member 2:19 and many other good winners. 



8 



[January 20, 19C6 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 1 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



COMING EVENTS. 
Rod. 

Jan. 1-June I — Closed season for black bass. 

April l-Sept. lo. Of t. 1&-Feb. I— Open season for taking stca'.- 
bead In tidewater. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16 -Close reason In tidewater for steelbead. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 

Sept. 15 -April 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Oct. 16-Nov. lb -Closs season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. 1-Aprll I— Trout season closed. 

Nov. 1-Aprll 1— Closed season for taking steelhcad above the 

water. 

Nov. l-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. I5-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
» iter. 

Gun. 

July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
age hen. 

Oct. I5-Feb. 15— Open season for quail, ducks, etc. 

Oct. 15- April 1— Open season for English snipe. 

Oct. 15-Aug 1— Deer season closed. 

Bench Shows. 

Jan 10, II— Bay State Co operative Bench Show Association 
Fall River. Mass. Walter E. Stone, Clerk. 

Jan. 17, ao— Cincinnati Kennel Association. Cincinnati, O. 
John C. Schomakor, Secretary. 

Jan. IS, 19— Lynn Kennel Club. Lynn, Mass. Tom B. Mtdd:<- 
brooke. Superintendent Entries closed Jan. 6. 

Jan. 24, 27— Southern Kennel Club. Memphis, Tenn. Harry W. 
Clapham, Secretary. Entries closed Jan. 10. 

Feb. 13, 15— Westminster Kennel Club. New York. Robt. V. 
McKIm, Secretary. Entries close Jan. 35. 

Feb. 30, 33— New England Kennel Club. Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. Entries close Jan. 30. 

Feb. 38-March 3— Washington Kennel Club. Washington, Pa. 
F. C. Thomas, Secretary. Entries olose Feb. 33. 

March 1, 3-Southern Ohio Kennel Club. Hamilton, Oh o. 
Thos. Boli, Secretary. 

March 7, 10— Duquesne Kennel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S. 
Steadman. Secretary. Entries close Feb. 25. 

March 8, 10— Colorado Kennel Club. Denver, Col. T. W. Bar- 
tels, Secretary. 

March 13, 16— Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N. Y. S. P. White, 
Secretary. 

March 1-1, 17— Passaic County Fish and Game Protective Asso- 
ciation. Paterson, N. J. Jas. Matthews, Secretary. 

March 31, 34- Wolverine Kennel Club. Detroit, Mich. K. G. 
Smith, Secretary. 

May San Francisco Kennel Club, lute annual bench sh.w, 

Fred P. Butler, Secretary. 

May 39, 30— Long Island Kennel Club. Jos. M. Dale, Secrt tary, 
Brighton Beach, L I. 

June 1 3— Ladles Kennel Association of Mass. Mrs. L. M. 
Speed. Secretary. 

June»— Wlssahlckon Kennel Club. WIssahickon, Pa. J. Ser- 
geant Price. Secretary. 

Sept. 3, li-Taunton Kennel Club. Taunton, Mass. A.J Leo, 
Secretary. 

Sept. 8— Cedarhurst Kennel Club. Cedarhurst, L I. Jno G. 
Bates, f>ecretary. 

Field Trials. 

Jan 8— Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, 33d annual trials 
Bakersfleld, Cal. Albert Betz. Secretary, 301 Parrott Uldg., San 
Francisco. 

Jan 8-Texas Field Trial Club. 4th annual trials. KaLsas 
City, Tex. 

Jan. 9-Georgia Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. 
Waynesboro, Ga. P. M. Essig, Secretary. Atlanta, Ga. 

Jan. 15-Unlted States Field Trial Club. 17th annual trials. 
Grand Junction, Tenn. W. B Stafford, Secretary. 

Jan. National Championship Field Trial Club lOih antual 

trials. Following U. S. All Age Stake. W.B.Stafford, secre- 
tary, Trenton, Tenn. 

O 

PACIFIC COAST FIELD TRIALS. 



The twenty-third annual trial of the Pacific Field 
Trials Club were run near Bakersfleld, Kern county, 
commencing Monday, January 8th and cocluded on 
Saturday, the 13th. 

Taken as a whole the trials were successful in most 
respects. The Derby, to the regret of many present, 
did not begin to compare with the stake of 1903. 
The dry conditions of the grounds and unfavorable 
weather prevailing the first two days of the meeting 
was a handicap which the young dogs could not over- 
come. Towards the end of the week weather condi- 
tions were a bit more favorable. 

Mr. J. W. Baughn of Ridgeville, Indiana, judged 
each stake, his decisions being favorably received. In 
the Derby the associate judges were Henry L. Bet- 
ten and John H Schumacher. Mr. Schumacher gave 
way to Mr. \V. Dormer in the All Age as he had his 
dog. Sir Roderick, among the starters. 

Bessie Mootimer, the Derby winner, is a stylish and 
merry worker and a remarkably good looking English 
Setter. The daughter of Kilgarif, out of Lady F., 
showed the class expected of her, notwithstanding the 
limited opportunities offered. 

Aunt Marie, winner of second in the Derby, is a 
well built medium sized liver and white English Setter 
bitch that is a painstaking and persistent worker. It 
was the opinion of a number of sportsmen who saw 
her work her heat in the first series that had ground 
and scent conditions been right a most interesting 
race would have been put up. 

Lady Belle, a clean, racy built white and liver ticked 
Pointer bitch, showed class to a degree. Frank Schu- 
macher, her owner, came up from Los Angeles with 
a broken arm in a sling. He had faith in his dog and 
his gameness in following the cavalcade each day 
"entitled him to win," as one of the enthusiasts put it. 

The All-Age stake was of a more pleasing texture 
the dogs running in this stake being more or less 
seasoned field trial workers. 

Kilgarif, the winner, easily sustained his reputa- 
tion as a consistent performer. He is a stylish, strong- 



ly built, upstanding white, black and tan dog. He 
has endurance and speed, is a wide goer and is en- 
dowed with lots of bird sense Orion, his sire, was a 
winner at one of the Coast trials. Kilgarif's field 
trial career began with the Coast Derby in 1903, 
which he won. He also won second in the Coast All- 
Age event in 1904. third in the Independent trials All- 
Age in 1905. Policy Girl is a handsome little bitch, 
whose stature belies her classy qualities, for she 
possesses speed and stamina that is surprising. She 
is a bird hunter and field trial worker that, consider- 
ing her size, is rather surprising. She won third in 
the Pacific Northwest All-Age in 1904, first in ' the 
British Columbia All-Age in 1905 (beating Kilgarif) 
and second in the Pacific Northwest All-Age in 1905. 

Avalon is a good type of a Setter and is a promis- 
ing dog. He ran unplaced last year in the All-Age. 
His work in the second series of the All-Age and 
later in the Championship stake stamps him as a 
class dog. 

Raffles, winner of the Members' Stake, notwith- 
standing the lamentable showing he fnade In the 
Derby, when he found birds, on Friday redeemed the 
promise of his breeding. Elsie second, was not In 
the best condition for the long heat she had. but she 
proved herself a game one and is a painstaking and 
stylish bird finder. Betsey, third, is a handsomely 
built liver and white bitch full of class. 

The Champion Stake was clearly Policy Girls" until 
the last 15 minutes of the two hour heat when she 
stopped. Cuba Jr. showed far better form in this race 
than in the All-Age Avalon, the runner up, had also 
got into better going. 

At the annual meeting of the club Wednesday the 
following officers were elected: Hon. H. W. Keller, 
Santa Monica, President; John H. Schumacher, Dos 
Angeles, First Vice-President; Joseph E. Terry, Sac- 
ramento, Second Vice-President; Albert Betz, San 
Francisco, Secretary-treasurer; Messrs. Elmer E„ Cox, 
Madera; W. W. Van Arsdale, Frank W. Jermyn, San 
Francisco; W. S. Tevis, Bakersfleld, and Charles N. 
Post, Sacramento. Executive Committee. 

The Executive Committee were authorized to select 
the grounds for the next annual trials of the club 
which will be held in the last full week of January, 
1907. 

The Committee of Ways and Means, composed of 
Messrs. W. W. Van Arsdale, Joseph E. Terry, H. W. 
Keller, Elmer C. Cox, Dr. C. W. Hibbard and F. H. 
Jermyn, were invested with power to acquire a club 
preserve either by lease or purchase. 

The following new members were elected: J. G. 
Roberts, Madera; John Erikson. Seattle; Lloyd Tevis, 
Bakersfleld, Rube Louis, San Francisco; Dr. J. M. 
Dunn, San Francisco; A. B. Spreckels, San Francisco; 
Victor Caglieri, San Francisco; F. D. Ross, Hanford; 
William Yeadon, Eldorado; Judge W. J. Baughn was 
elected an honorary member of the club. 

A note of thanks was extended by the club to Mr. 
W. S. Tevis for many courtesies extended. 

Among those present during the trials were W. W. 
Van Arsdale, Clinton E. Worden, E. N. Briggs. Dr. J. 
M. Dunn. Andrew Jackson, Dr. C. W. Hibbard, H. T. 
Payne, Frank Mayer, J. X. DeWitt, Victor Caglieri, 
S. Christenson, Frank H. Jermyn, Rube Louis, R. A. 
Smyth, J. W. Flynn of San Francisco; John Erikson, 
Seattle; Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Tevis, Mr. and Mrs. 
Captain Taylor, Masters Lloyd, Willie, Gordon and 
Lansing Tevis, Mr. T. Hopkins, H. E» Packard, Clem 
Wilson and Ed. King. Bakersfleld; A. F. Jilson, Jas. 
E. Terry and Hon. Chas. N. Post, Sacramento; Elmer 
E. Cox and J. G. Roberts, Madera; J. Ml McDaniels, 
Paso Robles; Hon. H. W. Keller, Santa Monica; John 
H. Schumacher, Frank G. Schumacher, Percy Schu- 
macher and Gen. C. F. A. Last, Los Angeles: Dr. C. 
E. Wilson, Albert Betz, H. L. Betten, Alameda, Wm. 
Dormer, Oakland; R. E. Galloway, Bakersfleld; Wm. 
Yeaden, El Dorado county; W. L. Whelpley, F. D. 
Ro=s Hanford; Milton Donley, Fresno; Manager R. 
M Dodge and Handler S. N. Carlile, Stockdale Ken- 
nels; W. B. Coults. Chas. and Fred Coults, Kenwood 
Kennels; Chas. H. Babcock and Mrs. Babcock, Del Rey 
Kennels- John E. Lucas, Mount Clemente Kennels; 
THE DERBY. 

The drawing for the Derby took place Sunday even- 
ing January 7th. twenty-two entries paying the start- 
ing' fee— 11 English Setters and 11 Pointers. The 
starters and detailed, order of running in the first 
series being as follows: 

Monday. January 8, 1906— A cool, fairly bracing 
morning tempered by a light frost the night before 
promised well for the day's running. The sanguine 
expectations of those in attendance were not realized 
except in a few instances, for the results during the 
first day of the trials were disappointing, particularly 
to those who had been present during the Derby 
of 1905. which event was from start to finish a proces- 
sion of stylish performances. 

The general quality of the eight braces of young 
dogs running to-day was not up to the standard 
looked for, not that they were a bad lot by any means. 
Xearly all of the heats in the first series were blank 
on birds. The impression prevailed with some sports- 
men present that It was the intention to run the dogs 
in open ground as a trial of speed and endurance, 
hunting and ranging qualities and attention to the 
course, and that consequently no particular efforts 
would be made to get among birds'. This impression 
was erroneous, for while the tryout of the qualities 
mentioned was much desired, when birds were located 



every opportunity was given the puppies to show 
their abilities. There were, now and then, some neat 
bits of work, but almost every dog in the sixteen 
smirched the blight colors in his heat with a veneer- 
ing of subsequent faulty work that ordinarily should 
have put him out of the running. 

The general opirion finally prevailed that the dry 
condition of the ground, particularly so on several 
fields where the alkali dust was alike disagreeable to 
man and dog, was the principal reason for many in- 
stances of apparently wretched nose work. Dogs ran 
close by birds a number of times, finally flushing the 
quail when they galloped almost over them. The 
birds favored by the weather, were enabled to hold 
scent apparently to a baffling degree. 

Tod Sloan— Misfit— At 9:30 a. m. the first brace 
were put down at the northeast corner of Section 

16. 7 miles from Bakersfleld, in open ground covered 
with low dry weeds. The course was southwest. 
Tod Sloan, Chas. Coutts, handler, and Misfit in charge 
of Lucas, set off at a merry clip but did not range 
far enough out to locate a small bevy, which was 
seen in some dry weeds to the left. Shortly after- 
wards Misfit found fur chasing to her liking and 
failed to show up for ten minutes. The circuit of the 
field was made, but no birds were found. Ordered 
up at 10 o'clock. All heats in the first series were 
not less than 30 minutes duration. 

Merry Duchess-Sonoma — The next brace down at 
10:15. Merry Duchess, Fred Coutts handler, with 
Sonoma, Chas. B. Babcock handler. This pair were 
cast off at the starting point and drew a blank after 
the second trip around the mile square section So- 
noma has speed and good ranging qualities and show- 
ed a bird hunting disposition that won the good opin- 
ion of the spectators. 

Madera-Goliath — Were cast off at 11:03. Madera 
in charge of Babcock, and Goliath with Coutts Sr. as 
handler. The two Setters started In a field in section 

17, west of the first ground, drew blank and were 
again put down in a field further west, beoynd a wide 
irrigation ditch. The course was north and shortly 
birds were located in a patch of sparse low cover 
studded with cottonwoods. Goliath shortly found and 
made the first point of the day. Both dogs showed a 
fancy for rabbit running at times. In fact, this pen- 
chant, varied by flushing and chasing back, was of too 
frequent occurrence. This heat was the best of the 
forenoon, both dogs were speedy, ranged wide and 
hunted well. Goliath for a large dog is an easy paced, 
quick mover and covers a deal of ground well. Up. 
at 11:33. 

Mishap-Navajo — At 11:50 Mishap. Lucas handler, 
and Navajo, Chas. Coutts, were put down in a field 
further west and tarted on a southerly course, dogs' 
handlers, judges and the cavalcade of spectators fol- 
lowed across the road on to a pasture field of the 
Fraser ranch. Birds were seen flying into the trees 
ahead, a few shots were fired to scatter them when 
suddenly a large bevy flushed, scattering in every 
direction, principally to the tree tops. The dogs re- 
peatedly ran by birds, bird scent was a hard problem 
for young dogs working over ground rooted up by 
hogs. Finally in the southeast corner of the field little 
Mishap, a merry worker all throughout the heat, 
located and pointed nicely after flushing a bird. Lucas 
claimed the point, followed up, flushed and fired a 
l>l»uk cartridge. Mishap was staunch to wing and shot. 
Up at 12:30. Birds were so plentiful any time 
during the heat that they were pelted out of the tree 
tops by the spectators. Many were marked down 
afterwards, but when the spot was worked it was 
found the birds had sprinted to different localities 
for the time being. 

After luncheon at the Gosford ranch house the fifth 
brace was cast off 'wo miles away on what is known 
as the "mule field," west of the Canfield schooihouse, 
eleven miles from Bakersfleld. 

Aunt Marie-Hickory wood — iAt 1:55 p. m., in a north- 
erly direction, Aunt Marie, Coutts Sr. handler, and 
Hickorywood, handled by Dodge, were cast off. Marie 
proved to be a swift, wide going ranger and merry 
worker. Her style elicited the favorable comment of 
many. Hickorywood seemed to like to linger near his 
handler. The pair finally located a bunch of scattered 
birds, but neither seemed to use the nose, for not a 
point was made. A n umber of birds were flushed by 
both dogs. Up at 2:37. 

Senator Don-Senator Jack — Two sons of ch. Senator 
P., were put down at 2:43 in an adjoining alfalfa field. 
Don with W. B. Coutts, and Jack in charge of Chas. 
Coutts. Both dogs ran by birds. Jack pointed and 
then flushed two birds, dropping to wing. Don seemed 
to be unable to find. Both dogs were working a patch 
of dry weeds. Jack distinguished himself by gallop- 
ing into and flushing a large bevy. Up at 3:15. 

Oakwood-Dollie— Cast off at 3:30 in Section 25, op- 
posite the schooihouse. Dodge handled Oakwood and 
W. B. Coutts handled Dollie. Both dogs were fast 
wide goers. Dollie made the first find near the road. 
Oakwood honored just as the bird flushed. Dollie again 
pointed, backed nicely by Oakwood, no bird was 
found, probably a runner. Oakwood had a fancy for 
fur chasing in this heat. Up at 4. 

Uncle Dudley-Raffles— Cast off at 4:10 in the same 
field and on a similar course. Chas. Coutts handled 
Raffles, Lucas handled Uncle D. This pair was con- 
sidered the class of the day and much was expected 
of them. Over the same ground as the preceding 
brace they drew blank. The judges then ordered the 
dogs put down, across the road, in the field north 
of the schooihouse, where birds were known to be 
lying. Birds were soon located. Both dogs were 
speedy and stylish workers. Each made wide casts 
and quartered in well. Nose work and scent would 
not assimilate for numerous birds were flushed. Dud- 
ley finally settled on a point and was steady to gun- 
fire and flush. Up at 4:52. 

Tuesday. January 10th — Morning cool, with a slight 
southerly breeze. The character of the heats run 



January 20, iy06] 



Che gvccovx cms J^f'octsniuu 



(o-day, while showing at odd times, some excellent 
individual exhibitions, was practically colorless, for 
almost every heat was barren of bird work. The 
general failure of the young dogs to discover birds 
was no doubt caused by the dry and dusty state of 
the ground gone over. The rather warm day and lack 
of scent wafting wind also militated against the de- 
sired showing on birds. 

Most of the grounds gone over were the same as 
were worked the day before, save a vineyard on the 
Canfield ranch, opposite the schoolhouse. Birds were 
fairly plentiful, but it was very difficult to get them 
in favorable cover. Several times the quail were 
routed out of trees with clods and sticks, efforts were 
made to scatter bevies and to drive the birds into 
open ground, these attempts proved futile in most 

C3.S6S 

Encinal-Bay wood— Cast off at 9:15. in Section 16, 
practically the same ground and course over which 
the initial brace of the Derby started Baywood, 
handled by Dodge, found first, a small scattered bevy 
in open cover, the Pointer was steady and nicely 
backed by Encinal. After this there was several 
flushes, both should have done more work. The 
Setter also had a fancy for fur. Up at 9:55. 

Senator-Montauk J.— Cast off at 10, in same field. 
Senator, in charge of W. B. Coutts, here showed pace 
and range that took him into the second series. The 
field drew blank and the pair were taken into Section 
17, to the west, going south after a large bevy had 
been flushed by a rider. Senator found twice and 
was steady to shot and wing. Both dogs were off 
in nose. Up at 10:45. 

Bessie Mortimer-Lady Belle— Cast off at 10:55, 
westerly over good ground in Section 17. A large 
bevy was discovered an eighth of a mile away in the 
open These birds were flushed by a rider, who 
vainly tried to turn them to advantageous cover. 
Enough single birds were left for the dogs to hunt 
after. Both dogs were stylish and classy workers. 
The heat was the only errorless one of the series. The 
single opportunity for a point was taken advantage 
of by Bessie, in charge of Fred Coutts, who was 
steady to wing when the bird flushed. Belle had no 
chance on birds, she was handled by W. B. Coutts. 
Up at 11:25. This ended the first series, during which 
there were no bevy points. 

After lunch at the Gosford ranch, the judges an- 
nounced the following dogs carried into the second 
series: Senator with Mishap, Goliath with Sonoma. 
Lady Belle with Encinal, Bessie Mortimer with Aunt 
Marie, Uncle Dudley with Baywood were the reserve 
brace. 

Senator-Mishap— Cast off at 2:32 in a vineyard on 
the Canfield ranch. Birds were seen shortly after, 
but they were wild and took to the trees. Senator's 
nose was not up to expectations; several points were 
claimed, but no birds were found. Mishap failed to 
honor on one occasion. 

Goliath-Sonoma — This brace was run on the install- 
ment plan. Sonoma and Handler Babcock were ab- 
sent. Goliath was put down at 3:15 in a field north 
of the schoolhouse and ran fifteen minutes with Tod 
Sloan as a work mate. Babcock drove up shortly 
afterward and then ran his charge for fifteen minutes, 
after which both dogs ran together for about twenty 
minutes. Scattered birds were discovered several 
times, but neither dogs located birds nor made any 
points. Up at 4:28. Mr. Van Arsdale afterwards 
withdrew Sonoma, deciding to abide by the rules. 
This action was in accordance with the ethics of 
srort. for Babcock's absence was unavoidable and 
the abeyance of the rule was satisfactory to all. So- 
noma was looked upon as having an excellent chance 
for a place. 

Encinal-Lady Belle — Down at 4:52, south of the last 
field worked, in Section 17. Birds were marked out 
in alkali woods cover, to which they had flown from 
the high cottonwoods alongside the county road. En- 
cinal pointed once and showed good bird hunting qual- 
ities. The brace were called in at 5:30. 

Wednesday, January 10 — The ground selected for 
the Derby finals was near Gosford Station, six miles 
southwest of Bakersfield. 

Bessie Mortimer- Aunt Marie— Cast off at 9:25 in 
Section 20. Birds were soon found in scattered wil- 
lows and a wide bottom swale. Marie scored a single 
and was steady to flush, Bessie backing stanchly. Both 
dogs did satisfactory bird work during the ten min- 
utes 1 they were down. 

Goliath-Encinal — Cast off at 10, on the same 
ground. After ten minutes work on a few scattered 
birds they were taken up. Goliath chased a rabbit in 
this heat. Encinal did not show up as strong as prev- 
iously. 

Lady Belle, a bye— Put down at 10:30, on the same 
ground. Belle cut out a merry clip and covered 
ground closely in search of birds, but drew blank. 
Up at 10:40. 

The judges then announced the winners as follows: 
Bessie Mortimer first, Aunt Marie second, Lady Belle 
third. 

ALL-AGE STAKE 
The All-Age Stake was started Wednesday morning, 
after the Derby. The route taken was towards the 
Gosford ranch. The drawing took place Tuesday 
night, with 21 starters named, run in the following 
order: 

Kilgarif-McCloud Boy— Put down at 10:50, in open, 
weedy country. Kilgarif, handled by W. B. Coutts, 
McCloud Boy handled by Babcock. Kilgarif swept 
away in a wide cast and worked ground closely and 
with great speed. He seemed to intuitively understand 
that birds were not in that locality. Then, making 
another cast, he brought up in cover across the rail- 
road track, where he was found dropped to a bevy 
point. Following this up, he quickly pointed six 
singles in a snappy manner that was an exhibition of 
work on quail that was believed would not be ex- 
celled or possibly approached by any other dog in 
the stake. This episode was the first showing of the 



kind of work the enthusiasts were so anxious to see, 
and was a rift in the clouds of prior disappointment. 
McCloud Boy backed Kilgarif steadily, but did not get 
a point credit, he failing to locate a bird. Both dogs 
have pace, range, and are merry workers. The heat, 
however, was Kilgarif's by a wide margin. 

Kenwood-Count's Gift — Cast off at 11:25 in the same 
field, no opportunity for bird work offered, ordered up 
after a run of 30 minutes. 

After lunch at the Gosford ranch a drive of three 
miles southeast to Section 21, where birds were 
known to be. 

Cuba Jr.-Chiquita — Chiquita, Lucas handler, was 
substituted in this heat for Uncle Jimmie Whitestone, 
withdrawn by Lucas, because he was too sick to run. 
Chiquita had drawn a bye. Cast off in the southeast 
corner of Section 21 at 2:20. The course was over 
an open dry-weed covered field. After a wide cast 
northerly a lot of birds were flushed from trees. Cuba 
pointed several of the high perching birds and was 
steady both to shot and wing. Chiquita came to a 
stanch point just as the birds flushed. Both dogs 
showed good speed, range and endurance. Up at 
2:53. 

Belle Fontaine-Policy Girl— Cast off at 2:58, they 
worked over open ground to scattered cottonwoods 
and willows' in the western section of the field. Belle, 
Chas. Coutts handler, found two bevies and made 
four singles. Girl, in charge of Lucas, did some good 
work off to the south while on a long cast. She lo- 
cated a bevy and made several singles, she seemed t* 
be a little unsteady in backing at times. She showed 
a shade greater range and speed than Belle. Both 
dogs were stanch to shot and wing. Up at 3:16. 

Checkmate-Romp — Put down at 3:40. Checkmate 
in charge of Dodge found twice, as did Romp, who 
was handled by Fred Coutts. Both were steady to 
shot and wing. The Pointer, however, refused to 
honor Romp's point. Up at 4:15. 

Thursday, January 11th — A blustering sandstorm 
with all the up-to-date discomforts for man and beast 
such as only the Mojave desert can produce, put a 
quietus 1 on the sport to-day. Weather conditions 
were very unfavorable when the start was made early 
in the morning for the locality the judges had selected 
for the opening heat, Section 16, a district that had 
been gone over by the Derby dogs A southeast wind 
was working up and the air was laden with infinites- 
mal particles of sand. The weather prophets present 
were kind enough to outline what was in store for 
man, horse and dog. nor were they, as after events 
proved, wrong in their forecast. 

As the day advanced the wind grew stronger and 
the irritation from the alkali dust increased. The 
dogs sent away over the fields were all apparently 
willing to work honestly, but the best of them were 
repeatedly at fault. Nose was secondary to sight, and 
the latter quality was handicapped by burning par- 
ticles of alkali dust. Birds were found rather plenti- 
fully. Notwithstanding the dogs often ran over 
ground where birds were lying close without locating 
them. Many birds were afterwards flushed by those 
following the dogs. In several instances birds held so 
close to cover that they were approached almost 
within reaching distance before flushing. Nose was 
at a discount and scent was a tradition. Every time 
birds and rabbits were disturbed it was noticeable 
that they left a lee side shelter. 

Calaveras-Star's Rod — Cast off at 9:09, the route 
was 1 west over an open field full of bunches of tumble 
weed and alkali spots. Both dogs were speedy rangers 
and showed bird hunting qualities to a degree. After 
a run of forty-three minutes, during which birds were 
an unknown quantity, the dogs were taken up. Bab- 
cock handled Calaveras, Dr. Wilson looked after Star's 
Rod. 

Del Rey Belle-Ivywood— Cast off at 10:07, Dodge 
handling Ivywood and Chas. Coutts in charge of Belle, 
in the same field. After a ten-minute run they were 
sent off in promising ground on Section 15. After a 
run through scattered willows and cottonwoods some 
pretty bird work took place in open ground south. 
Belle received credit for a bevy point and three 
singles. She was steady under gunfire and to wing. 
Ivywood did the proper honors in backing. This 
brace ran thirty minutes. 

Sabine'sMollie-Cuba's Japan — Cast off in the same 
section at 10:31. This heat was' an eye-sore and 
heart-breaker to those following the dogs. Single 
birds were often flushed after the Pointers had work- 
ed over the ground and several small bevies were 
stirred up. The wind and dust was too strong a 
factor for any dog, no matter how classy. A num- 
ber of points were claimed, but not allowed. Birds 
were nowhere on investigation. The dogs worked as 
well as they knew how, but they were up against a 
hard proposition. 

Avalon-Countej-s Lou — A change of ground was 
taken to the northwest corner of Section 17, fairly 
open country with scattered cottonwood trees. Here 
at 11:35 Avalon, Babcock handler, and Countess Lou, 
W. B. Coutts handler, were sent away at a merry 
clip. Both dogs soon struck open country. Countess 
making an especially wide cast. A large bevy of quail 
(lushed some distance ahead of the advancing horse- 
men. When the dogs came to the same ground they 
failed to locate birds. Single birds were repeatedly 
flushed afterwards. It was conceded by everybody 
present that under the conditions 1 the dogs were not 
at fault. 

After lunch at the Gosford ranch, the whole party 
drove to Section 21, three miles southeast, where birds 
could be found. 

Sir Roderick-Keepsake — Cast off at 2>, in open 
ground skirted by poplars and cottonwoods Babcock 
handled Keepsake, W. B. Coutts handled Sir Roderick. 
Two minutes 1 after the dogs started a bevy of at least 
100 quail was flushed by the riders. The dogs were 
working well out to each side. Here birds were 
found in plenty and the ground was quartered back 
and forth. Many birds were (lushed by people after 



the dogs had gone over. The wind was blowing so 
fiercely at this time that it was often difficult to tell 
whether a running objec t In the open was one of he 
dogs or a bunch of tumble weed. Keepsake finally 
came to a staunch point and was steady to the flush 
and shot. Rod was not within distance to honor. 

At 2:35 the dogs were ordered up and it was de- 
cided to start a-fresh on Friday morning. Indica- 
tions for rain during the night raised hopes with the 
sportsmen for the possibiliity of observing better 
work during the running of the second series. 

Friday, January 12th— The dogs selected by the 
judges for the second series were Countess Lou with 
Calaveras, Star's Rod with Avalon, Keepsake with 
Policy Girl, Belle Fontaine with Kilgarif. 

The overcast sky promised rain and the storm of 
Thursday served to clear and cool the atmosphere, 
thus making weather conditions somewhat more fav- 
orable. 

Counters Lou-Calaveras — Cast off at 9:20 in the 
northeast corner of Section 21. The dogs made a 
straightaway cast to the south and in a very short 
time a large number of birds were located, but neither 
dog made a point. They were clearly off in nose, and 
from this it was thought that the experience of the 
prior two days was to be repeated. Up at 9:40. 

Star's Rod-Avalon— Cast off at 9:45 on the same 
ground. In a very short time Avalon located a bevy, 
following with two singles, Star's Rod failed to find, 
but he backed prettily. Both dogs developed fine pace 
and range. 

Keepsake-Policy Girl— Birds being plentiful here 
and the cover being all that could be desired, it was 
decided to complete the series on the same ground, 
and the next brace. Keepsake (Babcock) and Policy 
Girl (Lucas), were cast off from the south side of 
the field at 10:15. A northerly course was taken along 
the knoll, on which was some likely cover. The dogs 
worked the ground rapidly and thoroughly, both show- 
ing remarkable speed and range, but they failed 
to locate any birds. The heat clearly belonged to 
Policy Girl. She was on the outside all the time. 

Kilgarif-Belle Fontaine— The next and final heat of 
the second series was between Kilgarif (Charles 
Coutts) and Belle Fontaine (W. B. Coutts). Down 
fifteen minutes to a blank. 

Kilgarif-Policy Girl— (After the dogs were ordered 
up the judges caled for Kilgarif and Policy Girl to 
run a heat together to determine the respective merits 
of the two favorites. They were down about thirty 
minutes, but 'again failed to locate any birds and, 
after being taken up, Judge Baughn announced the 
winners as follows: Kilgarif first, Policy Girl second, 
and Avalon third. 

MEMBERS' STAKE. 

After the usual appetizing lunch provided by the 
c lub and served daily at the Gosford ranch, under the 
supervision of Fred Tegeler, of the Southern Hotel, 
Bakersfield, who was most painstaking during the 
week to make everybody comfortable and well pro- 
vided for, the Members' Stake was drawn with eight 
starters — two English Setters and six Pointers. This 
event was not without several comedy flashes', for 
among the spectators were a number of quick-witted 
geniuses who were not averse to offering the amateur 
handlers more os less pertinent advice at critical 
times. How palatable this may have been can easily 
be understood when several of the gentlemen in 
charge of their shooting dogs were well supplied with 
adipose tissue and the going was not as smooth as 
body Brussels. Taken altogether the event was of 
much interest. The weather conditions, ground and 
birds were all favorable to an excellent showing. 

The entries and order of running were as follows: 

Lloyd Tevis' Pointer Elsie with W. S. Tevis' Pointer 
Stella. 

J. McDaniels' English Setter Cloudlight with S. 
Christenson's Pointer Raffles. 

J. M. Donley's English Setter Monterey with Clin- 
ton E. Worden's Pointer Betsey. 

F. D. Ross' Pointer Swede with Howard B. Smith's 
Pointer Lottie Ripstone. 

Elsie-Stella— Cast off at 1:25 in the field east of 
the Canfield schoolhouse. Dry weeds, cornstalks and 
open alfalfa stubble was the variety of cover worked 
through. The heat was a pleasing exhibition between 
two superior hunting dogs. Elsie, in charge of Master 
Lloyd Tevis, had a shade in pace and range over 
Stella. No birds were found. Up at 1:35. 

Raffles-Cloudlight— Cast off at 1:38, over the same 
ground. Cloudlight (McDaniels) came to a point fif- 
teen feet from the starting point. The find was not 
given credit and a bird was flushed by the advancing 
handlers and judges. A bevy was shortly flushed. 
Raffles cut away on a long cast to the left through 
the cornfield. He found and was steady on his 
singles. Cloudlight also located several' singles. Up 
at 2. 

Monterey-Betsey— Put down at 2:10, for thirty min- 
utes. Off in open ground on east side near a large 
haystack. Betsey made one bevy point and three 
Singles. Monterey found a bevy and came to point 
on a single bird. Both dogs worked nicely. The 
Pointer, in charge of Mr. Worden, and H. W. Keller 
handled the Setter. This was clearly an individual 
heat, the dogs were too far apart to honor each other 
on point. Both were steady to wing. 

Lottie Ripstone-Swede — Down for twenty minutes 
in the same field. Both had fair range and speed. 
Swede worked out a find on a single bird in close 
cover. Opportunity for extended work did not arise. 

Raffles-Elsie— The final heat of the stake was of 
one hour and eight minutes duration. Cast off at 
3:15 In the field opposite the schoolhouse on open 
ground, the brace worked westerly into the vineyard. 
Birds were plentiful. Both dogs found single birds, 
each honored the other consistently and were steady 
to shot and wing. Raffles was the fastest and had 
the most range. 

The judges announced the winners as follows: First, 
Baffles; second, Elsie; third, Betsey. 



10 



<H4w pvvc&sv cmi> Sportsman 



[January 20. 1906 



CHAMPIONSHIP STAKE. 
Saturday. January 18th — A cool morning with a 
light southeast breeee and the atmosphere faintly 
humid, overhanging heavy clouds and a downpour of 
rain in the distant southwest were all more pleasing 
features for the running of the Championship Stake 
than had ensued during any of the previous days. 
There were four starters, Stockdale Kennels Pointer 
t'uba Jr. (Dodge, handler), W. W. Van Arsdale's Eng- 
lish Setter MoCloud Boy (Babcock). W. W. Van Ars- 
dale's English Setter Policy Girl (Lucas), and W. W. 
Van Arsdale's English Setter Avalon. 

Cuba Jr.-McOloud Boy— Cast off at 9:10 at the 
northeast corner of Section 16, down for a two-hour 
heat. The course was southwest. Both dogs went 
away at a lively pace. From the start the range and 
speed were clearly Cuba's, and this pace he maintained 
throughout the entire two-hour heat and also in the 
final half-hour heat. Cuba cut away on several wide 
ranging casts and in fifteen minutes located birds in 
the low weedy cover of the open field. He made a 
bevy point following with a snappy nose to a single. 
Shortly afterwards he located birds in dry willows 
and was steady to gun fire and wing. McCloud Boy- 
was by no means idle; several points and backs were 
made by him. Both dogs did some pretty work in 
heavy brush after which they were taken eastward 
into Section 15. A detour of the field drew blank. 
Both again found birds in Section 16. Cuba was busy 
after birds all the time and never let up in speed or 
quartering his ground. Up at 11:10. During this run 
Mrs Tevis was an interested spectator. She arrived 
on the field driving a handsome pair of matched 
ponies to a phaeton. 

Policy Girl-Avalon— Cast off at 11:35 in the north- 
east corner of Section IT. The route was west and 
south in an open pasture field with scraggy cotton- 
woods here and there. A slight drizzle at this time 
helped matters considerably. Both dogs shot away 
with the speed of coursing hounds. Birds were soon 
found close to the west fence line, and then the fun 
began. Girl located the bevy and had a shade in 
speed and range. Both dogs were classy and cov- 
ered their ground in the merry fashion so dear to the 
hearts of sportsmen. Scattered birds gave oppor- 
tunity for each dog to score points. Each honored 
the other in backing and both were steady to gun- 
Hash and the birds" llight. A pretty double back then 
took place in the open field half a mile to the south- 
east. Girl came to a point after a wrae cast off to the 
south, McCloud was a quarter of a mile away and 
came sailing down the line into steady position, while 
Girl wheeled into a back to the visiting Setter. 
Further on, beyond a wide ditch, a large bevy was 
Hushed by the following rigs. The birds laid so close 
that the wagons 1 approached within ten feet before 
they flushed. Here both dogs worked merrily ,each 
found birds and every phase of a dog's performance 
with a scattered covey was vividly shown to the 
greatly pleased Spectators These two half-hours com- 
pensated for all the previous blanks and mediocre 
work of the trials. The course led away to the north- 
east into heavy ground, interspersed with alkali 
patches. This locality was the Waterloo for Policy 
Girl. She had so far shown the class, speed, range, 
attention to course, nose and bird work that put the 
race to her credit, but the clever little Seter here suc- 
cumbed to the pace that was too strong a test for her 
endurance and within fifteen minutes of victory she 
came to heel and refused to face the finishing touches 
of the race. Gallant as was her work throughout, 
she quit and was counted out, for dogs, like horses, 
must finish under the wire. The fact that she was in 
season, had been served by Avalon the day before, 
and scoured repeatedly during the heat may be taken 
into consideration as strong factors in inducing her 
to let up. 

Cuba Jr. - Avalon — This unexpected situation 
prompted the anonuncement by the judges, after 
consultation, that Cuba Jr. and Avalon would be put 
down at three o'clock for a thirty minute heat to try 
for first and second places. The brace were put 
down at the center post on section 21. The heat was 
not of an overly exciting nature, for but few birds 
were found. Cuba showed that he had a reserve found 
of endurance throughout the run. Avalon kept up to 
his performance in the previous heat. The dogs were 
orered up at 3:33 p. m. and the judges announced the 
winners: Cuba Jr. first, Avalon runner up. 

Summaries. 

Bakersfield, January 8, 1906 — Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club's twenty-third annual trials. Derby, for 
Setters and Pointers whelped on or after January 1st, 
1904. Purse $640, 3 moneys, 50, 30 and 20 per cent 
and trophy to each winner. $5 to nominate, $5 second 
forfeit. $10 additional to start. 46 nominations, 38 
paid second forfeit, 22 starters (11 English Setters, 
11 Pointers). W. J. Baughn, Ridgeville, Ind.; H. L. 
Betten, Alameda, Cal., and John H. Schumacher, Los 
Angeles, judges. 

First Series. 

W. B. Coutts' (Kenwood, Cal.) liver and white Pointer 
dog Tod Sloan (Bolin's Duke-Whisper), whelped July 
19, 1904. Owner, breeder: Fred Coutts, handler 
With 

J. W. Considlne's (Seattle) white and black English 
Setter bitch Misfit (Count Rowdy-Roxane). whelped 
September 23, 1904. Owner, breeder; J. E. Lucas, 
handler. 

Jos, E. Terry's (Sacramento) white and orange English 
Setter bitch Merry Duchess (Fairland Dude-Merry 
Heart), whelped July 30. 1904. Chas. N. Post, Sacra- 
mento, breeder; Fred Coutts, handler. 
-J" With 

W. W. Van Arsdale's white and liver Pointer bitch So- 
noma (Dr. Daniels-Babe Jingo), whelped Januarv 13 
1905. Owner, breeder; C. Ji. Babcock, handler. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's (San Francisco) white and (.range 
English Setter bitch Madera (Uncle B.-Count's Gift), 
whelped August 24, 1904. Owner, breeder; C. H. Bab- 
cock. handler. 

With 

S. Christenson's (San Francisco) black white and tan 
English Setter Goliath ( Kilgarif-Maggie F. ), whelped 
April 3. 1'JOI. P. D. Linville, breeder; \V. B. Coutts, 
handler. 



J W. Considines blue belton English Setter bitch Mis- 
hap (Count Rowdy-Roxane), whelped September 23, 
I Owner, breeder; .1- I-:. Lucas, handler. 

With , ■ 

\V J Morris' (Los Angeles) white, liver and ticked 
Pointer bitch Navajo (Teddy Kent-Jacks Fashion), 
whelped May 20. 1904. Owner, breeder; Chas. Coutts, 
handler. 

Stockdale Kennels' (Bakersfield) white and liver Pointer 

ting llicknrvw 1 u'li. Cuba of Ken wood - Pet ronella ) . 

whelped Ma\ :, I '-■(■ 4. Owner, hr ler; K. M. Dodge, 

handler. ' „,., 
With 

Iluirh Hopkins' (Minturn, Cal.) chestnut and white Eng- 
lish Setter bitch Aunt Marie (Uncle B.-Sport s Belle), 
whelped January 3, 1904. H. R. Edwards, breeder; 
W. B. Coutts, handler. 

John Erikson's (Seattle) white and black Pointer dog 
Senator .lack (Ch. Senator P.-Miss Rap), whelped July 
2? 1904 J W. Flynn. breeder; Chas. Coutts, handler. 

With . 
I w Flynn's (San Francisco) white and orange Pointer 
' dog Senate. Don (Ch. Senator P -Flynn's Dolly Jingo), 
whelped May 13, 1904. Owner, breeder; W. B. Coutts, 
handler. 

Stockdale Kennels' liver and tan Pointer dog Oakwood 
(C* Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella). whelped May 1, 
•(04 owner, breeder; R. M. Dodge, handler. 
With 

T W Flvnn's white and lemon Pointer bitch Dollie 
iCI, Senator I '.- l''l ynn's Dolly Jingo). Owner, breeder, 
W. B. Coutts. handler. 
t in t ,„...«• (S in Rafael. Cal.) black, white and tan 
•\ ;; K ^,;'se,, , ,u' l d,,g R r.,-.e Dudley (Cm,,, t Whitestone- 
Counts May Belle), whelped May 1(. 1904. White 
and Peebles (Seattle), breeders; Lucis, handler. 

* „ •-__,.„■ a iscnnton Pa.) white and black Pointer 
' ■.l^l^^s M ; irs:",a";r\' i -Miss Rap). J. W. Flynn. 
breeder; Chas. Coutts. handler. 

^'(Ch-Tubi ^e^J-^Z'. >g 
May 1. 1904 Owner, breeder; R. M. Dodge, handler. 

Mrs C. E. Wilson's (RoslTcal.) white, black and tan 

breeder and handler. 
t w irwnn s Pointer dog Senator (Ch. Senator P- 
J K]Vnn's i'VoUv JingoK whelped May 13. 1904. Owner. 

breeder; W. B. Coutts, hand ler - 

Coutts, handler. « 
Frank G. Schumacher's (Los 

ticked Pointer bitch Lady BeUe ( ten ( Dos 

Second Series 

Senator with Mishap. 
Goliath with Sonoma, 
i ; ,jv | idle with Encinal. 

' - Tnird ! sUU: ' 

Goliath with Encinal. 
Lady Belle, a bye. u 

First. Bessie Mortimer; second. Aunt Marie; third. 
Lady Belle. 

Bakersfield January 10, 1906-Pacific Coast Field 
Tr a J cUil.'s twenty-third annua. All-Age f Stake Open 
to all Pointers and Setters not winners of hrst in an> 

;,f) «'. J. BWU. H U Belten an.l WUIlM. Do- 
mer, judges. 

First Series. 

Jos. F. Terry's ^"^^;:, f W,, ;^H,^M'ar; UU \-.- " 

Si:',', J^y'k 19oY K 0«. r breeder; W. B. Coutts. 

handler. with 
W W. Van Ar^^i^^^H^I: 

^cy;;ed , '1 1 .-niber i 2f > 19 , 00. " H. Hopkins, breeder; 

C II Babcock, handler. 

Owner, breeder; Fred Coutts, handlei. 

whelped April 10, 1902. Owner, breeder, C. H. Bab 
cock, handler. 

JacqueT Humboldt, Iowa, breeder; Chas. Coutts. 
handler. With 
j w Consldlne'fl (Seattle) white, black and tan EntH-J" 
Setter bitch Policy Girl (Dave Earl-Tops Queen). J 
E. Lucas, handler. 

Stockdale Kennels' white and liver Pointer dog Check- 
mate (Cuba Jr.-Bow's Daughter), whelped August 1, 
1'103 Owner, breeder; R. M. Dodge, handler. 

With 

Jos E. Terry's white and orange English Setter dog 
Rump (Orion-Terry's Lady), whelped July 25, u«M- 
Owner, breeder; Fred Coutts, handler. 

W W Van Arsdale's white, black and tan English 
Setter dog Calaveras (California Bell Boy-Peach 
Blossom) whelped August 22, 1902. Owner, breeder, 
(' H. Babcock, handler. 

With 



J. V\. l-lynns (San Francisco) liver and white Pointer 
bitch, Sabine's Molly i Sabine's Rip Rap-Fannie Coin), 
whelped April ui;. 1911:1. (jeorge Demers, breeder- W 
B. Coutts, handler. 

With 

Stockdale Kennels' black and white Pointer dog Cuba's 
Japan (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Winnipeg Flv) whelped 
May 13, 1903. Owner, breeder; R. M. Dodge, handler. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's white, black and tan English Set- 
ter dog Avalon (California Bell Bov-Peach Blossom) 
whelped August 22, 1902. Owner, breeder; C H Bab- 
cock, hnadler. 

With 

K. II Cox's (Madera. Cal l while, black and tan English 
Setter bitch Countess Lou (Count's Mark-Marv Lou) 
whelped September 4. 1902. J. E. Terrv, Sacramento' 
breeder; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

John H. Schumachers (I,os Angeles) black and white 
English Setter dog Sir Roderick (Detroit Joe-Dolores) 
whelped May 19, 1903. Owner, breeder; W. B. Coutts. 
handler. 

With 

W. W. Van Asdale's white, black and tan English Setter 
bitch Keepsake (California Bell Bov-Peach Blossom) 
whelped August 22, 1902. Owner, breeder; C. H. Bab- 
cock, handler. 

Second Series. 

Countess Lou with Calaveras. 
Stars Rod with Avalon. 
Keepsake with Policy Girl. 
Belle Fontaine with Kilgarif. 

Third Series. 
Kilgarif with Policy Girl. 

Result. 

First, Kilgarif; second. Policy Girl; third. Avalon. 

Bakersfield. January 12, 1906 — Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club Members' Stake. No dog eligible that was 
placed in any event other than the Pacific Coaat 
Members' Stake or that was a starter in any open 
stake of this meeting. Trophy to each winner. En- 
trance $10. 8 starters (2 English Setters, 6 Pointers). 
Messrs. Baughn and Betten, judges. 

First Series. 

Lloyd Tevis (Stockdale) black, white and ticked Pointer 
bitch Elsie (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Jingo's Bagpipe). 
Stockdale Kennels, breeder, owner, handler. 

With 

W. S Tevis' i Stockdale) Pointer bitch Stella (Cuba Jr.- 
Winnipeg Fly). Stockdale Kennels, breeder, owner, 
handler. 

J. McDaniels' (Paso Robles) white and liver English 
Setter Cloudlight (Bonner N. -White Wings). W. W. 
Van Arsdale, breeder, owner, handler. 

With 

S. Christenson's white and black Pointer dog Raffles 
Ch. Senator P.-Miss Rap), whelped July 23. 1904. J. 
W. Flynn. San Francisco, breeder, owner, handler. 

J. M. Donley's (Fresno) white and orange belton Eng- 
lish Setter Monterey (Llewellyn Drake-Shadow). W. 
W. Van Arsdale, breeder; H. W. Keller, handler. 
With 

Clinton E. Worden's (San Francisco) white and liver 
Pointer bitch Betsey (Dr. Daniels-Nellie Bang). 
Owner, handler. 

F. D. Ross' (Hanford) black, white and ticked Pointer 

dog Swede (Fitz ). Owner, handler. 

With 

Howard B. Smith's (Colton) white and liver Pointer 
bitch Lottie Ripstone. Owner, handler. 

Second Series. 

Raffles with Elsie. 

Result. 

First. Raffles; second. . Elsie: third Betsey. 



Bakersfield, January 13, 1906— Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club Championship Stake, open to all. $10 to 
start. 50 per cent to first, 25 per cent to runner up, 
trophy to each. Two-hour heats. 4 starters (3 Eng- 
lish Setters. 1 Pointer). J. W. Baughn. judge. 

First Series. 

W. W. Van Arstdale's white, black and tan dog McCloud 
Boy I Tony Boy-Sadie Hopkins), whelped December 
25, 1900. Hugh Hopkins, Minturn, Cal., breeder; C. 
II. Babcock, handler. 

With 

Stockdale Kennels' I Bakersfield, Cal.) liver and white 
dog Cuba Jr. (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Florida), whelped 
March 13, 1899. Owner, breeder; R. M. Dodge, handler. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's white, black and tan English Set- 
ter bitch Policy Girl (Dave Earl-Top s Queen). J. E. 
Lucas, handler. 

With 

W. W. Van Arsdales white, black and tan dog Avalon 
(California Bell Boy-Peach Blossom). Owner, breeder; 
C. H. Babcock, handler. 

Second Series. 

Cuba Jr. with Avalon. 

Result. 

First. Cuba Jr.; runner up Avalon. 




Stockdale Kennels' liver and white and tan Iointer 
bitch Ivvwood (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella). 
whelped 'January 22, 1903. Owner, breeder; R. M. 
Dodge, handler. 

With 

W II. Estabrook's white, black and tan English Setter 
bitch Del Rev Belle (California Bell Boy-Countess 
Mark), whelped October 21. 1903. W. W. Van Ars- 
dale. breeder; Chas. Coutts, handler. 



Points. 

The prizes for the winners in each of the events 
were donated by various members of the club, and 
were elegant in design. It is an observed custom 
that the intrinsic value of trophies shall not be more 
than an understood nominal sum, in this the selec- 
tions were of substantial value. 

The prizes were taken by selection, the winner of 
first place having first choice, etc. 

A list of the donors and trophies follows: 

Derby — W. S. Tevis. Bakersfield, beautifully de- 
signed silver goblet; Joseph E. Terry. Sacramento, 
large silver ornamented beaten copper cup; Charles 
N. Post, Sacramento, silver mounted leather stein. 

All-Age — Howard II. Smith. Colton, antique silver 
ornamented oak cigar box; W. W. Van Arsdaie, San 
Francisco, heavy silver mounted cut-glass decanter: 
Frank H. Jermyn, Scranton, Pa., silver covered de- 
canter, demijohn design. 

Members' Stake— Tudor J. A. Tiedemann, San 
Francisco, elegant silver mounted leather cup, fash- 
ioned after the old-time "Black Jack ale mugs"; 
Hnhm Bristol Company, San Francisco, silver mount- 
ed black jack mug; Southern Hotel, Bakersfield. sil- 
ver mounted cut-glass loving cup. 

Champion Stake— W. S. Tevis challenge cup to 
winner; J. B. Kerckhoff, Los Angeles, silver cup to 
runner-up. 

Handlers' Prize Western Field silver cup trophy. 



Judge Baughn reached Bakersfield a few days prior 



January 20 1906 



<2Uic $reec»er mto *$povt&txian 



11 



to the trials. During this time he inspected the trial 
grounds and also tried out the style and mettle of 
the California valley quail, a bird heretofore some- 
what unfamiliar to him. both with younger dogs and 
some of the veteran field trial workers of the Stock- 
dale Kennels. The judge is a good field shot, but 
the birds baffled his aim at first. He soon acquired 
the proper eye and showed the members of the sur- 
veying party some pretty singles and doubles over 
point work by the dogs. 



Stockdale Kennels were unfortunate in the loss of 
Combination Boy, a Derby entry, that died recently. 
Midget, entered In the All-Age. was withdrawn: a 
badly cut foot was the reason. 



\V. W. Van Arsdale purchased Policy Girl on Wed- 
nesday. The next day she was served by Avalon. It 
is expected the nick will be a good one, it being de- 
sired to bring together several crosses represented 
by the two. 



P. D. Linville, we regret to note, was unable to 
attend the trials by reason of illness. He had made 
his headquarters at Ashe ranch and had a string of 
dogs there for a month or more. Ill health confined 
him to bed nearly all of this time. Our latest reports 
are that he is somewhat better. 



S. Christenson's win with Raffles was a popular 
one. His becoming the owner of the dag is, to a 
certain extent, amusing. By reason of his unsatis- 
factory Derby debut Mr. Jermyn felt indifferent to 
Mr. Raffles. Tuesday evening a jolly crowd were at 
dinner, joking and bantering each other about their 
respective dogs. Mr. Erickson's dog was equally in 
disgrace. Jermyn picked up a hnadful of nuts from 
a dish and suggested to Erickson that they should 
go "odd or even" for both dogs. Erikson won and 
afterwards presented the Pointer to Christenson, who 
now thinks highly of him. for he is far from being 
an ordinary dog. 

Ducks and quail were daily on the menu served at 
the club tables in the hotel. Hon. H. W. Keller, 
Frank Mayer, Dr. C. W. Hibbard and others provided 
the game. 

Shooting parties had fine sport in the quail coverts 
and along the irrigation ditches after ducks, towards 
the end of the week. 



Master Lloyd Tevis was awarded the handlers' prize 
by unanimous vote. 

Master Tevis is a graceful youth behind a bird 
dog in the field and won many compliments for the 
skillful manner in which he handled his charge dur- 
ing a run of one hour and eight minutes. 



Last Saturday Jermyn, Erikson and Christenson 
each bagged the quail limit in a very short time. 
Dr. Daniels was with the party. He is a grand dog 
with the gun. 

Henry Betten also enjoyed the quail shooting avail- 
able. 



trophy would lie retired to an honored place in a 
cabinet at Stockdale. Mr. Tevis, instead, has gen- 
erously returned the cup to the club for future com- 
petition in the stake. 



Jos. E. Terry presented to W. W. Van Arsdale a 
handsome puppy by Kilgarif-Terry's Lady. The young 
Setter was named Judge Baughn in honor of the 
presiding judge. The puppy was chosen because he 
most resembled his sire, by Judge Baughn, from two, 
the choice of which was offered Mr. Van Arsdale. 



Absentees were remembered in various ways by 
those in attendance last week. When Section 17 was 
first visited "one of the boys" remarked: "This is the 
place where Richards fell in the ditch." 



HENRY E. SKINNER. 

On Thursday, January 11th, Mr. Henry E. Skinner 
.passed away at his late residence in Berkeley. 

Mr. Skinner was known to and esteemed by hun- 
dreds of sportsmen, during the past thirty years, for 
many genial qualities prompted by a generous dispo- 
sition and a sterling character. 

Among sportsmen he was recognized as a whole- 




Mr. W. S. Tevis has won the championship cup 
three times now. Under the original conditions the 



THE LATE HENRY E. SKINNER 



souled fellow sportsman. With the angling fraternity, 
latterly with the Shieve-Barber Company, 
in particular, he stood high as an authority and as 
a practical and skillful angler. 

For over a quarter of a century Mr. Skinner was 
identified with the sporting goods trade, being suc- 
cessively connected with Liddle and Kaeding, the E. 



T. Allen Company; the H. E. Skinner Company, and 
Coast anglers are much indebted to Mr. Skinner for 
many innovations in tackle. Through his extensive 
experience and knowledge of the art he was for years 
the introducer, to local and Coast anglers, of main 
articles and fashions in up-to-date tackle. 

Mr. Skinner had been In failing health for a year 
and several weeks ago he was compelled to give up 
active attention to business. The effort for regain- 
ing health was unavailing, and after an illness of 
several weeks' duration he succumbed to the inevit- 
able. 

His demise was a sorrowful shock to a large circle 
of friends and business associates. 



TRADE NOTES. 



A Grand Showing for Winchester Shells. 

Sporting Life's trap shooting review for 1906 tells 
the same old story, only in different language, that it 
has told for the last six consecutive years. That is, 
that the Winchester "Leader" and Winchester "Re- 
peater" shells stand first in records, first in popularity 
and first in shooting qualities. The two leaders for 
1905, Mr. Fred Gilbert and Mr. W. R. Crosby, shot 
Winchester "Leader" shells exclusively last year The 
former's average for the year was 95.6 per cent and 
the latter's 95.5 per cent, both gentlemen having shot 
at over 16,000 inanimate targets during the year 
There were forty-six professionals and amateurs that 
shot at least 3,000 targets during the year of 1905 and 
made over 90 per cent averages, and of this number 
more used Winchester shells than all other makes 
combined. Of the first fifteen leaders, ten used Win- 
chester shells exclusively. Such an array of facts is 
indisputable evidence as to which shells are the first 
choice among the shooters throughout the United 
States and Canada, and further is a testimonial by 
the masters of the art as to the superior qualities of 
the Winchester shells, tn 1900, 1901, 1902 1903, 1904 
and 1905 Winchester "Leader" and Winchester "Re- 
peater" shot gun shells won the highest averages of 
the world for the year, an unbroken chain of evi- 
dence of merit and popularity that speaks for itself. 
Last year the shooters that used Winchester shells 
carried off every honor, and captured the Grand Amer- 
ican Handicap, the Grand Canadian Handicap the 
Grand Preliminary Handicap at Indianapolis,' the 
Amateur Championship of the United States, the 
longest straight run on record, all the championship 
trophies of any importance, as well as all the state 
championships, the Grand Pacific Coast Interstate 
Championship Trophy, and any number of other 
prizes, which to numerate would fill a good sized 
book. When such stars as W. R. Crosby, Fred Gil- 
bert, C. G. Spencer, J. W. Akard, R. R. Barber H C 
Hirschy, C. M. Powers, J. M. Hawkins, John W Gar- 
rett, John s. Boa, Jack Fanning, J. A. R Elliott 
Harold Money, Frank Faurote, Neaf Apgar, J L D 
Morrison. W. F. Sheard, David Elliott, C. F. Confarr' 
E. E. Ellis, W. J. Rand, C. Bulwer and other notable 
trap shots shoot the Winchester make of shells mak- 
ing and breaking records, winning the highest hon- 
ors obtainable, it is indisputable evidence that these 
stars know that the Winchester shells are the only- 
shells to shoot. 




If you have choice dairy products, 
dispose of them to select consumers. 
The proper search will find those who 
are willing to pay good prices for good 
goods. 

Avoid dirt in the dairy just as much 
as you would avoid failure. The one 
will cause the other. 



DARK. DEVIL 
Thos. w. Lawson's Trotting Bred Stallion 

There is at least one good advantage 
in keeping cows, ana that is If the 
milk cannot be turned into butter or 
cheese profitably it can in nearly all 
cases be fed to pigs and calves with 
profit. 

o • — 

Ten hens will eat an ounce of bone 
daily. 



There Is no doubt about poultry be- 
ing a source of profit If It Is Intelli- 
gently handled. If it is not Intelligently 
handled. It is likely to be a source of 
disappointment and loss. 

Don't throw away any sour milk: the 
chicks are fond of it, and it is good 
for them. 



STOCK POINTS. 



There is a difference of opinion in 
regard to using blinders on horses. 
Some think that they shy without 
them, others believe that they are more 
easily frightened with them. 



II' stockmen only would remember 
that every time they neglect or abuse 
their stock, it is injurious to them- 
selves, it may be that they would be 
more kind. 



If a combine can be made with the 
cow. the hen and the horse, almost any- 
one can pay debts, lift mortgages and 
lay up money in the bank. 



Skim milk fed to cajves should have 
a temperature of 95 aegrees. There 
should be no variation. Lack of care 
in this is very detrimental. 



The no-purpose farmer with no-pur- 
pose poultry and live stock, turns out 
to be a no-profit farmer. Definite aims 
are essential to success. 

All kinds of stock should have their 
salt within easy reach where they can 
get it whenever they desire to do BO. 

in breaking horses, too much should 
not be attempted at once. Go slow, 
teach one thing at a time. 

o 

Oats Is the best feed for colts at 
meaning time No other feed will do 
as well. 



Norman Stallion For Sale. 

I |ARK IRON (JRAY NORMAN STALLION; 

1 weighs about 1000; 18 hands high; 4 years old. 
Is blot-Id I y built and a Bure foal getter. ColtH 
can be scon at San Jose. For further particulars 
address W. H. WILLIAMS. 

1120 Alameda Ave., San Jose, Cal. 



12 



[January 20 i» 6 



HOW TO HAVE HEALTHY HOGS. 



Qne of the first essentials to obtain 
a healthy, vigorous offspring is the 
necessity of having strong, active par- 
entage, and if this is a hereditary trait 
Intensified through several generations, 
bo much the better. Not long ago the 
ivriter was visiting a farm, and was 
requested by the owner to examine 
Ihe hogs thereon and give some esti- 
mates of the price of certain animals. 
This farmer had several very good 
brood sows, which were undoubtedly 
hardy and vigorous, as the large litters 
Ihey had farrowed distinctly showed. 
The young pigs were also in excellent 
condition and growing rapidly. The 
farmer semed to have a high apprecia- 
tion of these brood sows, and said they 
were valuable animals, and that he dis- 
liked to part with any of them. It Is 
true they were only grades, but never- 
theless they were possessed of those 
qualities valuable in the brood sow. 
Imagine what a surprise It was to see 
the male kept on this farm. He was a 
veritable scrub, long and lanky, and 
without any of the qualities one would 
seek in an animal, at least half of 
which are supposed to be transmitted 
to the offspring. This sire was nar- 
row in the chest and tucked up in the 
quarter, and certainly did not show any 
evidence of being a healthy animal, 
possessed of a good constitution. The 
example quoted is too often met with 
and is one of the contributing causes to 
the outbreaks of hog cholera which 
frequently occur. It Is of the utmost 
importance that the parents, both male 
and female, possess every evidence of 
health, for they are bound to transmit 
their qualities to the offspring, and if 
naturally weak and lacking in consti- 
tution disease will take hold of them 
easier and its ravages will be more 
complete. 

The management of the parent is 
another matter of great concern. Too 
often they are confined in narrow lots, 
which prevent their taking the exer- 
cise necessary to the proper develop- 
ment of the lungs and al the other or- 
gans of the body. The hog naturally 
is of a roving disposition, and if given 
his liberty he hunts around over the 
fields and through the forest growth, 
gathering various leaves and herbs that 
suit his taste. At the same time he 
is taking exercise which is vital to his 
well being; and if the breeding ani- 
mals, whether pure-bred or grade, were 
given more liberty they would keep in 
better health at all times, reproduce 
more freely, and the offspring would 
be hardier and possessed of better con- 
stitutions. It is often a wonder that 
hog cholera is not a more frequent 
visitor than proves to be the case, for 
the hog is frequently expected to live 
in a filthy, wet pen, cleaned out as a 
matter of convenience two or three 
times a year, and rarely; if ever, prop- 
erly supplied with bedding, and even 
disinfected so as to ward off disease. 
This is an old. old story, and it is a 
condition too commonly met with, even 
in this enlightened dayy when proper 
r-anltatlon for farm animals is recog- 
nized as a matter of the utmost impor- 
tance and one of the surest ways of 
keeping the animals healthy and pre- 
venting disease. 

Another reason why hogs are so sub- 
ject to attacks of cholera and other 
troubles is due to the fact that the 
males used at the head of the grade 
herds are generally purchased from 
men who deem it advisable to keep 
their animals in show condition, so they 
will sell to better advantage. It is truly 
an interesting sight to visit one of 
these breeding establishments, where 
the animals are kept so fat they can 
scarcely walk, and are thus perfect 
models of what a hog should be. But 
it is needless to say that animals so 
fed and pampered from the time they 
are young have their constitutions un- 
dermined, and have not that vigor and 
ability to throw off disease which ani- 
mals allowed to rough it a little more 
possess. — Prof. A. M. Soule in National 
Stockman. 

o 

Milk may be cooled by pouring from 
one vessel to another, by setting in 
cold water or placing on ice. The 
more rapidly it is cooled the more 
cream rises. 

Always churn just as soon as there 
is cream enough -and sufficient acidity 
develops. If cream is held beyond this 
it will be injured. 



It is not always the breeder who has 
the worst pronounciation who has the 
worst cattle. 



FOOD FOR POULTRY IN CHINA. 



Consul-General Rodgers, of Shang- 
hai, in reply to inquiries as to whether 
China offered a market for the sale of 
food for poultry, responds in the nega- 
tive, and furnishes interesting informa- 
tion in regard to the raising of poultry 
by the Chinese. He writes: While the 
Chinese are perhaps the most success- 
ful poultry raisers in the world, accord- 
ing to natural methods, they are also 
undoubtedly the most economical in the 
business. The foreigner, seeing the im- 
mense numbers of ducks, chickens, and 
geese of the countryside, naturally as- 
sumes that large amounts of grain or 
other poultry food must be consumed. 
Yet investigation reveals the fact that 
the Chinese consider the fowl perfectly 
able to pick up a living without much 
assistance on their part, and as a con- 
sequence herding is practiced, each 
flock being kept on the move, as sheep 
are on a range. It is <rue that at some 
periods of the year the fowls are fed, 
but the food given them would be con- 
sidered chaff in other countries, and is 
practically worthless. The natural re- 
sult of this is very poor poultry, but 
that is the rule and standard in nearly 
all China. It is an absolute fact, more- 
over, that the gleaning of the paddy 
fields by the flocks of duck, which often 
contain several hundred, is a distinct 
benefit to the Chinese farmer. As in 
all other methods of life, the poultry 
raising process is another wonderful 
exhibition of the marvelous economy of 
the Chinese. Indeed, it may be said 
that the frugality of the Chinese in 
such industry, as compared with the 
prodigality of others, is an excellent 
illustration by which to measure the 
radical difference between the Chinese 
and all other races in the production of 
wealth. In view of these statements 
China can not be considered a promis- 
ing field for the exploitation of Ameri- 
can poultry foods, unless there should 
come a great increase in the value of 
the product and a reversal of estab- 
lished custom, neither of which is likely 
to occur. 

o 

PRIZE FAT STEERS. 



Blackrock. the grand champion of the 
1905 International Stock Show at Chi- 
cago, exhibited by the Iowa Agricul- 
tural College, Ames, la., sold at $25 
per hundred weight. Blackrock was 
sired by a pure-bred Angus bull, and 
his dam was a grade Shorthorn cow 
and a good milker that gave to this 
steer his great quality. He was bred 
by Ed Hall, Mechanicsburg, la. He 
was bought by the college a year ago 
from a load that was sold to the pack- 
ers. No special ration was fed the 
champion steer. He was kept in mod- 
erate flesh on a light ration until about 
three months ago, when the forcing pe- 
riod began. During the fore part of 
the summer he ran in blue grass pas- 
ture. "Billy" Burlton, the college 
herdsman, says that his ration dur- 
ing the forcing period consisted of two- 
thirds ground corn and one-third bran 
and ground oats; about one pound of 
oilmeal and flaxseed meal were also 
fed per day. He was given one cooked 
feed per day, which consisted of corn 
and oats cooked together. 

In the slaughter test of the steers 
shown in the fat classes at the Interna- 
tional, which sold at auction, the high- 
est priced steer. Star Tablet, an Aber- 
deen-Angus two-year-old, dressed out 
70.31 per cent. He was bought by 
L. Pfaeizer, along with two others 
which dressed out 62.45 and 65.18 per 
cent, respectively. 

o 

Read current dairy literature and 
keep posted on new ideas. Observe and 
enforce utmost cleanliness about the 
cattle in grooming, bedding and care 
of stables. Animals suffering from any 
disease or those that have been ex- 
posed to a contagious disease must be 
kept isolated from all other cows in 
the herd. Keep dairy cattle in a room 
or stable by themselves. The best of 
ventilation and drainage should be 
provided. Huildings should have tight 
walls and be plainly constructed. Do 
not use musty or dried litter for bed- 
ding. 

o 

If it is necessary in order to keep 
the cows' quarters dry, raise the floor 
with clay pounded in hard and let it 
slope back from the manger so as to 
carry off w ater. 

o 

While scrub stock Is expensive at 
any price, there are some who flnu 
thoroughbreds more expensive, so they 
have to get along the best they can. 



CALIFORNIA DAIRY STATISTICS. 

The California Promotion Committee 
reports the following synopsis of the 
State Dairy Bureau's compilation of 
dairy statistics for California for the 
year ending October 1, 1905 This re- 
port is especially interesting in the 
matter of butter production. Such an 
advance has been made in the produc- 
tion of this article that it places Cali- 
fornia well to the front as a dairy state. 
The production is given by counties in 
the following table, the figures repre- 
senting the number of pounds: 

Alameda 886.315, Alpine 26,060, Ama- 
dor 266,656, Butte 166.652, Calaveras 
153.241, Colusa 234,819, Contra Costa 
557,114, Del Norte 641,112, El Dorado 
251,584, Fresno 2,166,048, Glenn 178,456, 
Humboldt 4.289.739, Inyo 137.442, Kern 
232,363, Kings 1,444,218, L,ake 124,942. 
Bassen 359,821. Los Angeles 1.431,045. 
Madera 75.424, Marin 3,959,641, Mari- 
posa 14,628, Mendocino 793,122. Merced 
1,786,082, Modoc 136,444, Mono 22,648. 
Monterey 534,241, Napa 738,983. Nevada 
139,623, Orange 585,268, Placer 253,544. 
Plumas 380.941, Riverside 411,148, Sac- 
ramento 1,578,751, San Benito 141,155. 
San Bernardino 181.216. San D'.ego 759,- 
111, San Joaquin 1,468,991, San Luis 
Obispo 1,309,831, San Mateo 206,261, 
Santa Barbara 687.204, Santa Clara, 
Santa Cruz 455,778, Shasta 11,312. Sier- 
ra 113.123. Siskiyou 4S6.692, Solano 675,- 
714, Sonoma 4.156,759. Stanislaus 2,006,- 
171, Sutter 683.684. Trinity 15,686, Te- 
hama 133.053. Tulare 1,735.888. Tuol- 
umne 29,468, Ventura 199,632, Yolo 
1,124,907, Yuba 83.648. Total 41.961.047. 

There was an increase of 17 per cent 
over the production of the previous 
year. Among the counties which show 
remarkable gains are Colusa, 28 per 
cent; Fresno, 25 per cent; Humboldt. 
11 per cent; Kern. 37 per cent; Kings, 
24 per cent; San Joaquin. 30 per cent: 
San Luis Obispo, 25 per cent; Sonoma 
45 per cent; Stanislaus. 22 per cent: 
Sutter. 101 per cent; Tulare. 15 per 
cent; Yolo, 25 per cent. The growth of 
butter output shows a gain in the state 
in five years of 211 per cent. 

o 

When a warm spell comes in winter 
it can be noticed that more eggs are 
obtained and that as soon as the 
weather becomes cold again the supply 
falls off. This shows that warmth is 
a factor in the production of eggs. It 
is not necessary to have summer 
weather. It is when the hens escape 
the extreme cold of winter that they 
begin to lay. If the changes of weather 
makes a difference in laying, then 
warm poultry house should also have 
an influence. When poultry must re- 
sort to the tree-tops, and be exposed 
to snow, rain, hail and wind, they can 
only keep alive, being unable to assist 
the farmer by producing eggs. If you 
want eggs in winter, you must provide 
a good, warm house for them, as well 
as provide pure, nourishing food. 
o 

Fine chaff and dry leaves gathered 
in the fall are to be preferred to hay, 
for litter in the scratching pen. The 
hens eat the hay and the winter rarely 
passes without several becoming crop- 
bound, with a diseagreeable operation 
or death as the result If you have lots 
of alfalfa leaves in your hay-mow, they 
are the best litter of all for scratching 
hens, for it is not only good for them 
to scratch but is a valuable addition 
to the feed necessary for producing 
eggs. 

o 

Never add any substance to prevent 
milk souring. Cleanliness and cold are 
the only preventives needed. Milk 
should be delivered in good condition. 
When cans are hauled far they should 
be full and carried in a spring wagon. 
Utensils for farm use should be made 
of metal and have all joints smoothly 
soldered and never allow them to be- 
come rough inside 

o i — ■ 

The farm is the place to produce 
turkeys cheaply No other class of 
poultry will pick up more of its food 
that would go to waste if not so picked 
up. Insects particularly are eaten in 
large quantities, and the crops of the 
farm are better off by their absence. 
o 

With a little effort, anyone can keep 
his horses' hoofs in good condition, and 
he should do it. 



Calves dropped in the fall are not 
worried when young by flies and mos- 
quitoes. 

o 

Have such drainage in and about the 
cows' quarters that water cannot stand 
there. 



SCRUB HOGS DIFFICULT TO 
FATTEN. 

Thousands of dollars are wasted 
every year by feeding scrub or low 
grade hogs. Some farmers buy any- 
thing that is a pig and feed It good 
feed for months, with a much less per- 
centage of gain in pork than if the 
same feed were given to a good, high- 
grade hog. Good breeding counts for 
gain not only with cattle, but with 
hogs, says the Texas Stockman and 
Farmer. 

The extra feed is more than wasted, 
for the loss of quality in the pork is 
another important consideration I 
know farmers who are careful to breed 
cows to a good thoroughbred bull, and 
at the same time are using a scrub 
boar. A grade or mixed blood male 
should never be used. Poor sows bred 
to a thoroughbred boar will often pro- 
duce good pigs, but the rule will not 
work the other way. 

I know some farmers turn up their 
noses at a pedigree, and a pedigree 
without the hog in front of it is worth- 
less; so is the hog without a pedigree 
behind him for breeding purposes. The 
pedigree shows he is able to repro- 
duce his own characteristics in his off- 
spring. 

Suppose a good thoroughbred boar 
does cost $15 to $20 more than a scrub, 
he ought to sire 200 or more pigs, 
which would be only a few cents on 
each. The better the sire the better 
the pigs, both in gain in feeding and 
in quality of pork. Now that thorough- 
bred stock Is so cheap, comparatively, 
any farmer can soon work into it. By 
co-operating, farmers need not be to 
any great expense for new blood to 
keep up their stock. I would rather 
pay $5 for a good thoroughbred pig to 
feed than $2 for an ordinary scrub, no 
matter how good looking he is as a 
pig. 

o 

The grinding of all kinds of stock 
feed increases the amount digested. 
But experiments show that if horses 
are young and have good teeth there is 
little difference between the ground 
and the unground. 

o 

Dairy cows have the ability to make 
pretty good milk when drinking pretty 
bad water. They \v o^tt^Urhrt?^Ji ore 
water and make inn i4jp^8j^<S# , ^^ ! ^ti i I k 
if they had better water 'to flrlnk. 
Try it. 

o 

The tail is an indication of breed. A 
short heavy tail at the top and taper- 
ing to a small brush does not indicate 
a purebred. But a long heavy tail with 
a large brush indicates a good dairy 
type. 

o ■ - -> 

If possible every farm should have 
a milk house in which the milk can 
be kept, the churning done, the milk 
vessels kept and plenty of water with 
which to cool the milk and wash the 
vessels. 

o 

It seems impossible to obtain milk 
absolutely free from bacteria This is 
probably right, as the presence of the 
bacteria causes it to clabber and the 
cream to rise. 

o '!.,.*'] 

. Sponges— S. Adderley. 307 Market St. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 



Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria, Removes ail 
Bunches from Horse*, or Cattle. 

As a Human Remedy f°r Rheumatism, 

Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., it Is Invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to give satisfaction. Price $1 60 
per bottle. Sold by drugtrlate, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with, full directions for 
its use. rirSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

•The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



January 20 it* 6j 



13 



Fowls of all classes enjoy a meal 
early in the morning. If delayed, they 
become restless. 



The farmer has the largest profit in 
poultry raising, hefause he has the 
least outlay for food. 



Don't be discouraged by a few fail- 
ures. They seem to be a necessary part 
of the poultry-raiser's education. 



If you intend to run an incubator 
next season, plan now to have enough 
to supply eggs to keep it running. 



STALLION TO LEASE 

To some oompetent horsemen that can furnish 
himself and take In charge 

EDWARD B. by STAM B. 

dam by Dexter Prince, to take the route between 
Rto VlMta and Courtiand and vicinity of D S 
Mathews' home ranch on Grand Island. The 
horse Is in good condition and ready for work. 
If the route isn't satisfactory another can be 
chosen. For further particulars write to 

D. S. MATTHEWS, Ryde, Cal. 




Great Horse Remedy. 



The lees and feet need watching and care. 
Ready for treating the common ailments 
saves'many a valuable animal. Begin in 
time and Kendall's Spavin Cure is a posi 
tive, permanent cure for 99T. of all cases of 
Spavin, Ringbone, Splint, Curb or Lame- 
ness. Keep it on the shelf. 

USED FOR YEARS. 

Northumberland. Pa , T)cc 19 1004. 
Dr. Tl. .1 Kendall Co., Enosbnru Kails, Vt. 

Gentlemen —Please send me a copy ol your 
"Treatise onthe Horee and li is Diseases." 1 
have been a user ol your Kendall's Spavin 
Cure lor years and reenmmentl it for man or 
beast wherever I have an opportunity. I 
have great conlldonce In it* use; have cured 
three dillerenl case* where a horse doctor 
lallod. H.J bTANNtltr 

Price $1; 6 lor $5. Greatest liniment 
known for family use All druggists sell it. 
Accept no substitute. The great book, "A 
Treatise on the Horse," f reo I ro a di ug,'ists or 
Dr. B J KENDALL CO , Enosbcrg Falls, Vt. 



Inquire of H. R. RAND, Fashion Sta- 
bles, Ellis Street. 

BAY gklding, Five years old. stands it 
hands, weighs 1200. By St. Whips. 1st dam by 
Daly, 2d dam by Milton Medium. Thoroughly 
broken single or double. A great actor, a grand 
road horse and warranted SOUND. 

CHESTNUT ORLDING, 8 years old. 18 bands 
high, weighs 1200 lbs. A grand surry or trap horse. 
Has been driven by a lady in the Park all winter. 
Without, a doubt, this Is the best family horse in 
the country. Guaranteed Sound. 

One New Side Bar Stivers (of N Y 1 Buggy 

Pneumatic tires, Carmine gear, black body. 

One Side Spring, High Hack, Business or Run- 
About Buggy. 

One New Chicago Road or Breaking Ca t. Long 
shafts. Best one in the city. 

One Set New Coach Harness. 

One Set New Surry Harness 

Ten Set New Single Harness. 

Two Sets of Run-about Harness. 

Also Light Road and Track Harness. Some 
Fancy Halters, Pads, Etc. 



WILLIAM HAROLD 2:13 V FOR SALE 

rpHE MEEK ESTATE HAVING BEEN PAR- 
J- titioned, and the breeding of horses discon- 
tinued, the stallion WILLIAM HAROLD 2:13^ 
Is ottered for sale or lease to a responsible party. 
William Harold is by Sidney 2:19?*. and bis dam 
Is Cricket 2:10 by Steinway Cricket is one of 
the great producing mares of California, being 
already the dam of live in the list and has three 
more foals that will be given records. William 
Harold has had the most limited opportunities 'n 
the stud, yet Is the sire of Janice 2:08^ trottiDg 
Dan Burns 2:15 and Judith 2:25 and several others 
in the list He is in excellent condition, and as 
his get are all large, well made and nicely turned 
horses he should be a good money earner in the 
stud if in good hands. Apply to or address 

H. W. MBEK, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



and just as they want it. The right way to 
salt animals .s to let them help themselves. 

Compressed 

Pure-Salt Bricks 

In our Patent Feeders, suppiy refined dairy salt. I 
Tney mean animal thntt. Th'-y cost but little. I 
Convenient for you and your I 
animals suffer no neglect. Ask I 
your dealer and write us for I 
booklet. 



Belmont 
Stable 
Supply Co. I 

fr t l UM, Mfrs. 
Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



A GOOD MARE FOR SALE. 

By CLIPPER 8:06, dam by ANTEEO JR. 

- YEARS OLD, TROTS OR PACES; HANr> 
1 some, sound and a high-class animal in every 
respect An Al rradster and will make a race 
horse or a valuable brood mare. Reason for sell 
lng Is that I have no time to devote to handling 
ter. Call or address 

Phone: GEO. C. PETERMAN, 

Oakland 8501. 779 Twelfth St., Oakland, Cal. 



Seldom See 

a big knee like this, but your horse 
may have a bunch or bruise on his 
Ankle, Hock, Stifle, Knee or Throat. 

ABSORBINE 

will clean them off without laying 
the horse up. No blister, no hair gone. 
$2 00 per bottle, delivered. Book 10-B 
free. ABSORBINE, JR., for man- 
kind, $1.00 Bottle. Removes Soft 
Bunches, Cures Varicose Veins. Gen- 
uine manufactured only by 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

54 Monmouth Street. Springfield, Mass. 

For sale by Mack & Co Laogiey & Michaels Co. 
eudlngton & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco 



678-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold 



THE Z1BBELL STABLE 

Z1RBKLL & SON, Proprietor* 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Boarding, Training and Handling all kinds 
Fancy Horses. A few Nloe Rigs on hand. Ti r 
an; oar going to the Chutes. Tel.: West 250 



The Perfectly Galted Trotting Stallion 

ALTA VELA 2:11 14 

(Reg. No. 22449) 

Sire, ELECTIONEER, sire of 166 in 2:30 and 

grandsire of Major Delmar 1:59%. 
Dam. LOKITA 2:18^ (dam of Alta Vela 2:11^ 
and Palorl 2:24!<p by Piedmont 2:17^; second 
("am, Lady Lowell (dam of Lady well 2:16' / 4 
and Lorita 2:I8"4) by St. Clair; third dam, 
Laura, dam of Doc, sire of Occident 2:16% 
Address all communications to BREEDER 
AND SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary St,, San Franclsoo. 



FOR SALE OR LEASE. 

Two Prince Airlie Stallions. 

PORTOLA 37413, a handsome golden bay. 7 

years old, 16 hands, weighs 1190 lbs. 
MENLO BOY 37401. a magnificent brown with 
white points, 6 j ears old, 16.1 hands, weighs 
1200 lbs. 

These t<vo horses are full brothers, being sired 
by Prince Airlie 28015: he by Guy Wilkes 2:I5M, 
sire of Fred Khol 2:07%, Hulda2:08^, Seymour 
Wilkes 2:08!^: first dam Signal by Del Sur 2:24: 
second dam Lady Signal 2:3514 by Signal 3327. 
Both of these horses are very fast for the amount 
of worn , being only a few months last year, show- 
ing quarters around :34 and 35. 

For further Information apply to 

P H. McEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Fine Span of Black Driving Horses 

\rERY STYLISH. STAND 16-1 AND 16-l'/ s ; 
' weight 1 155 and 1 175; five and seven years old; 
well bred and sound. Apply or address 

FRANK WIRE, Davlsvllle, Cal. 



A 



SURREY HORSE WANTED. 

HIGH-CLASS HORSE SUITABLE FOR 
surrey. Must be over 16 hands high, stylish, 
thoroughly broken for city driving, have good 
action and a good disposition. Give particulars 
where horse can be seen, price, etc. Address 
J. W , care of Breeder and Sportsman, 38 Geary 
Street, San Franoisco. 



Toghill Stud 



McKINNEY-SIDNEY FILLY FOR SALE 

1 YEARS OLD; SOUND AND A GOOD INDI 

vldual. Sired by McKlnney; dam by Count 
Valensln's Sidney; second dam by Anderson's 
Abdallah or. as he was better known, Paul's 
Abdallah.he bj Rysdyk's Hambletonlan, dam 
by imported Roebuck, grandam by the great 
thoroughbred Henry. I am not prepared to keep 
this mare and will sell her right Address Box 
447, Breeder and Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

\ FIVE-YEAR-OLD COLT, 14.2 hands high; 

weighs 900 pounds; bright sorrel in color; 
perfectly sound and can run a quarter of a mile 
In 23 seconds or better. He is one of the most 
beautiful and best bred sprinters In the State. 
Suitable for a polo pony. Will sell at a reason- 
able price. Address 

SOL SHOCKLEY, Merced, Cal. 



(Property of Stephen T. Britten) 



SQUIRE 

OF 
CHESTER 




Blue 
Roan 



THE LATEST IMPORTED ENGLISH HACKNEY 

SQUIRE OF CHESTER 

A few engagements m&y be booked for high-class, well-bred mares. 

WILLIAM WALKER, Manager, Menlo Park, Cal. 



FAIRBANKS, MORSE &CO 

STANDARD SCALES, RAILWAY SUPPLIES, 
GASOLINE ENGINES, STEAM PUMPS, ETC. 

Have Removed from 310 Market Street 

To 168-174 First Street 

CORNER N A TOM A BETWEEN MISSION AND HOWARD STS., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PV^rl IO*rPP6 Tflhlll^lt^H and type written ready for framing 
rtui^ltca laUUiaiCU Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



McMURRAY 





points:! 
Perfect Construction 
Light Weights, 
Great Strength, 
Easy Running, 
and LOW PRICES. 

McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

standard the world over. 

*2"Addresa for printed matter and prices 

W. J. KENNIY 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE-MUST BE SOLD. 

Bay Fllly, foaled May 9, 1904, by Alta Vela 2: 11 a 

and out of Grace Lowry by Diablo 2:09s<. 
Chestnut Colt, foaled 1902, by Nutwood Wilkes 

2:16*4 and out of Lily Lang try, dam of Dudley 

2:14, of Ed. li. Young 2:1 IK, of Lily Direct 

2:21 1 /i and of Estelle 2:2414 
Bay Colt, foaled May 31, 1904, by Bonnie Dlreot 

2:0b<4 and out of Allx U. 2:24V4 by Nutwood 

Wilkes 2:16'/,. 
Bay Fllly (thoroughbred), Reg. No 32793 foaled 

May, 1902, by Abalanzar and out of Flam- 

beauette by Flambeau. 
Address all oommunloatlons to CARLTON W. 
GREENE, Sixth Floor, Union Trust Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISADEKO AND FULTON STS. 
(1408 Falton S.reet) 

Horses Called For, Clipped and Delivered 

AT POPULAR PRICES. 
BUSINESS HORSES FOR l.'IKI 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Si able near the above oorner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving, a 
limited number of first-class horses at reasonable 
rates Have good location, brand-new stable and 
everything nrst-olass All horses In my oare will 
receive the best of attention. 
Phone: Park 573. T. C. CABNEY. 



FOR EXCHANGE 

ONE ( OOD LOOKING SOUND YOUNG 
ROAD HORSE, food actor, thoroughly eitj 
l.nil.r,, -and ONE CHESTNUT GKLUING 

sound and a good roador; both guaranteed every 
way. I want to trade the above horses for a well 
matched thoroughly broken team something that 
will do to use for park driving. 

Address, H. R. RAND, 

Fashion Stables, San Francisco. 



JACK FOR SALE. 

A BLACK JACK WITH LIGHT POINTS; 
1 ' large, heavy boned, prompt and a gooa han- 
dler. Is a good foal getter and his foals are 
excellent Individuals. Price very reasonable for 
prompt sale. Address for further particulars, 
S. B. WRIGHT, Santa Rosa. 



Deposit Your 
Idle Funds 



WITH THE 



Central Trust Company 
of California 

42 Montgomery St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sum 
large or small. 

INTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNOALLY 

3 1-4% on Ordinary Savings 
3 6-10% on Term Savings 

Send for Booklet, 
"THE SURE WAY TO WEALTH." 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St., San Francisco. 



14 



[January 20, 19C6 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SKA L Y Manager. 



BONNIE DIRECT (4) 2:05 




SIRE OF 



BONALET 3 2:09 ' , World's Record for 3-year-old Pacing Fillies 
BONNIE ME (3), Trial (Trotting) 2:111 

Season of 1906 at Pleasanton-Fee $100 

WITH RKTURN PRIVILEGE. Should horse die or be sold the service fee 
for mares not proving in foal will be returned. 

The facilities for care of mare or mares and foals is unsurpassed. 

DR. E. G. MCCONNELL C. L. GRIFFITH. 

705 SUTTER ST.. SAN FRANCISCO. PLEASANTON, CAL. 

*W SPAVIN CURE < 

Running Horse Owners 
and Trainers 





"Save-the-Horse" has proven absolutely 
unfailing on Bucked Shins. One bottle will 
cure from five to twenty cases. For 
strained, injured and broken down tendons, 
it is marvelously effective. 



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Pedigrees 



Tabulated 



OF 



Standard Bred 



AND 



California Trotting; Bred 



Giving- Performances of the Get 
of Sires and Dams, etc. 



Thoroughbred Pedigrees 

Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates 



BREEDER & SPORTSMAN 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



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"LIFE SHAFER," the widely known trainer of Zephyr 2:11, Beausant '£:\t and 
Terraoe Queen 2:06, says : 

Terrace Farm, Titusville, Pa 

Troy Chemical Co. : 

I used "Sive.the-Horse" all the past season. First on a bad splint close up to 
knee, horse very lama after fast work; could see decided improvement after a few 
days' uss; in a week's time, lameness all disappeared. Used with equal success on 
a bowed tendon ; at present am treating a horse that bowed a tendon :) years ago — 
was a bad case, was fired and blistered, but still went lame; have used a bottle and 
am still using "Save-the-Horse ;" the enlargement has gone down almost one-half, 
horse going sound, and I firmly believe will race again. A friend of mine had a 
horse that bowed a tendon last spring ; by the use of your great remedy, kept him 
racing all fall, gave him a record better than 2.65. Tendon is straight and sound 
as it ever was. Think it the great remad y, kept him racing all fall gave him a 
record better thad 2:05. Tendon is straight and sound as it ever was. Tnink it 
the greatest remedy on earth for a bad leg of anr description. 

Respectfully yours, 

Box 209. L. D. SHAFER, Farm's Trainer. 

The fire iron is uncertain; blistering is less effective, and both necessitate laying 
up the horse from four weeks to two months; mercurial and poisonous compounds 
produce irreparable injury. "Save-the-Horse" eliminates all these factore. 



POSITIVELY 



AND PERMANENTLY CURES 

Bone and Bog Spavin, Ringbone (except Low Ringbone), Curb, Thorough pin, Splint, 
Capped Hock, Shoe Boil, Windpuff, Weak and Sprained Tendonsand all Lameness. 
Horse can be worked as usual, it cures withour scar, blemish or loss of hair. 

Per bottle, written guarantee with every bottle, constructed solely to 
satisfy and protect you fully. We know positively "Save-the-Horse ' 
will absolutely and permanently cure, and for that reason guarantee 
is made all your way. The need of second bottle is improbable except in rarest 
cases. Send for copy of guarantee and booklet. All druggists and dealers or 
sent express prepaid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, BINGHAMPTON, NEW YORK, 

D. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 



$5.00 



VICTOR YERILHAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. McGRATH 

Manager 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Oor. of Grove and Baker Streets, just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 

(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devlsadero Street Cars) 

Best located and healthiest Stable In San Franolsoo. Always a good roadster on haDd for 
sale. Careful and experienced mon to oare for and exerolse park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladles can go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobiles 



:::::!:::::::j:tt:!?!!t:?j:::«:::!::::j:::jjH::; 

.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••a ••••••••••• I IT !!!!! 

••••• • •» ••••••••• • J ....... . • 1 5 • • • • • • Z • **!••*!*! t": 



CAMPBELLS 



EMOLLIO 
IODOFORM 



GALL CURE 

For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, CRUPPER 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS there is none 

superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL. 
For BARBED WIRE CUTS. CALKS, SCRATCH- 
ES, BLOOD POISON EDSORES and ABRASIONS 
OP THE SKIN it ha* no equal. 

It is veey adhesive and easily applied toa watery 
as well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON- 
ING. In this respect there Is no Gall Cure offered 
whioh can justly eien claim to be a competitor. 
We placed it on the market relying wholly on its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact that 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising, thesales of 1900 were 100 per cent great- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This Increase was entirely due to its 
M BRITS, and from it we feel justified In saying that 
itisTHE GALL CURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY, 
It is a quick and sure cure for those troublesome 
skin cracksunder the fetlock which injure and often 
lay up racehorses. 

All Trainers Should Have It la Their Stables. 

PRICE:-3 UZ. BOX. 25c J 1 LB. BOX. SI. OO. 

Read our "ad" on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs., 412 W.Madison St., Chicago, III. 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for it. 




PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



STALLION OWNER! 

tr You Need a Stallion Card or Stock Catalogue Compiled and Printed, Stallion Poster, 
Stallion Service Book, a Cut of Your Horse, a Horse Book of any kind or a Tabulated 
Pedigree, Get It where you cau get the CHKAPE8T and BEST. 

KOlt SAMI-1.ES AND PRICES ADDRESS 
MAGNUS FLAWS & CO., 358 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. ILL. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty reoogntie the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This spaoe of over a quarter 
of an aore has reoently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, ohandellers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 

WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern Improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Looatlon in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



THOMPSON'S SALE AND TRAINING STADLES 

PLEASANTON JEtACE TRACK 

One of the Best Equipped Training Stables in California. 

Owners desiriDg to have horses handled and put in condition for sale or, racing are Invited to 
correspond with the undersigned. 

JAS. THOMPSON, Pleaaanton, Cal. 



January 20, 19(6] 



15 



DUCK SHOOTERS! 

QUESTION==-Why is it that so many excellent wing 

shots cripple fine birds? 
ANSWER==-Because they don't use 

BALLISTITE 

which never fails to kill clean. 
REMEMBER===0ne (1) dead bird in the pocket is 
worth two (2) in the tule. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES SACRAMENTO 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 





Quinns Ointment 



Wilt Make A Horse Over; 

will pn t sound legs under him and ^ 

will save him from the cheap hawker and trader. It is the 
standard cure for Spavins, Curbs, Splints, Windpuffs and all 
the various lumps and bunches of like kind. Keep it always on 
hand and you w ill be prepared when trouble conies. Leading 
horsemen everywhere kuow it and use it. 

Mr. IT. IT. Clark, Frodonla. ft. Y., wrltesi "Tho bottle of 
Qulnn'a Ointment purchased from you about two years aro 
removed a curb and thoroutrhpin and did it for good. My 
horse's leg U as smooth as ever." 

Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mail* 
Write for circulars, testimonials, etc. 

W.B. EDDY & COMPANY, WHITEHALL, M. Y. 



°£™ R Be Master of Tto Diseases, 

GRIPPE 
EPIZOOTIC 
COUGHS, Elc. 



Not a oase of these ailments In horses, sheep or 
dogs that any one cannot promptly cure with 

dk craft's Distemper & cough cure. 

If your druggist oan't supply it, order direct— 50c 
and 81— money back If it fails. Send a postal 
today for our valuable booklet, "Veterinary 
Pointers " It Is fhkk. 




NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




We Make 16 urades, $17.75 to $300. Write for ART CATALOG to 

THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

To Coast Branch, PHIL B, BEKE ART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 



SMITH HAMMERLESS *»° EJECTOR GUNS 



ALSO 



HUNTER 

ONE-TRIGGER 




win 

Gold Medal 

at the 

LEWIS & CLARK 
EXPOSITION 




SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

HUNTER APMS CO, FULTON, NEW YORK 

Parker 

STANDS FOR 

Quality 

35,000 IN OSE, 



THE GUN OF 
QUALITY 




Quality Is of paramount importance. TIIK PARKER GUN is tho 
recognized standard or tbe world and stand* today better than 
ever. The best gun value In the world; DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR 
It cannot be equaled We never have made cheap, trashv gann 
and the PAKKGR Is always found cheapest In the end. The UUN for ItlC Thli 
good time to begin to get ready for next season. Let us anslst yon. Write today. 




N, Y. Salesrooms: 32 Warren St. 



30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 



SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



m 

Market St. 

Send tor 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

GXD 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



QUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



WELLS MEDICINE CO. , Chemists & Germologists, 1 3 Third St., Lafayette, Ind 

D E NEWELL, General Agent for Pacific Coast 510 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 



THE HORSEMAN'S HANDBOOK 

CONTENTS: 

CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF STALLIONS— The Stall— Fad- 
dock— Food— 1 tiseases Kxerclse— Grooming 
— Serviug Mares — Amount of Service. 

CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF BROOD MARES-ticttiiiR Mares 
in Foal —Care During I'i cmiiinry Abortion 
Foaling— Time When Mare is Due— In Season 
Again— Weaning Colt. 

BREAKING AND DEVELOPING OF COLTS— ('arc of Colt-Ed- 
ucatlng — Feeding — Care of Growing Feet- 
Breaking to Drive— Developing, Shoeing and 
Booting. 

MANAGEMENT OF CAMPAIGNERS — How to Keep the Race 

Horse In Condition and Keyed Op for a ltaco. 
CARE OF THE FEET— Booting and Shoeing— Bonner's 

and Berry's Views. 
CARE OF THE HORSE IN SICKNESS— Some Brief, Simple 

Kules and Kennedies. 
GAITING AND BALANCING— Correction of Faulty Caits, 

etc. 

ANIMAL TAMING AND TRAINING— Methods Employed by 
Gentry in Overcoming Wild Instincts of tho 
Horse and Teaching Him to Learn. 

STATISTICS— Championship Records of every class 
—Leading Sires of_':30 speed— Time of Fastest 
Miles by Quarters— List of High Briced Horses 
—List of Horse Associations and Registers— 
List of Horse Journals- List of Books on the 
Horse— 1'eriod of Gestation Table, etc. 

AMERICAN TROTTING RULES— The Complete Rules gov- 
erning Harness Racing with Index, Officially 
Signed by Secretary W. II. Knight. 

USEFUL INFORMATION — Kules for Admission to Stand- 
ard Registers - Rules for Laying out Tracks- 
Treatment of Horse's Teeth— How to Groom a 
Horse— About Clipping Horses— To Start a 
Balky Horse -Where to Buy Specialties for 
Horsemen, etc. 

DDIrr ( Paper Cover 50c 
rnlUtj Leatherette Cover SI 

Address BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

36 CEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pad tic Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed In positions. Send for oatalogue. 



E. P. HEALD. President. 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



Photo Engraving Company 

M Kill CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
606 Mission St. cor First, San Francisco 

COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND P1QS 

FOR BAM IN LOTS TO SUIT BT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

208 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-OKA I. BKS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 

Telephone Main 188 

CALIFORNIA 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points. 
Standard, Care, 
Training £ to. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
toother breeds as well as to Cockers, and it is a 
useful book for the dog owner. Tells how to 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE BY THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO CAL. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per inse rtion. Cash to accompany order. 



GREAT DANES 



nREAT DANE PUPS (BLUEBEARD-MAUD 
VJ S.) for sale; eight weeks old. O. BERG- 
STEN. Center-street Station, Oakland . 



GORDON SETTERS. 



TfOR SALE— PUPPY AND BROKEN DOG! 
x GEO. H STONE. Box 12. Fresno. Cal. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS* — QUINTO 
HERD — 77 premiums, California State Fairs 
1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef and milking 
families for sale. Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Francisco. 



PETER SAXE & SON. Liok House, S. F.,Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solioited. 

HOLSTEINS— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at State and oounty fairs, 
show ring, and every butter oontest since 1885 in 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F. 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Fran cisco. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAM8. 
Dairy Stock speolaliy. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Nlles & Co.. I,os Angeles 
Oil. 



VETERINARY. 



IDr. Wm, F*. Xlgan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. Y. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and AustrallanColonlea 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equina 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President ot 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Offlco, 
San Franoisoo Veterinary • Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Franoisoo: 
Telephone Park 128. 

Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cored In 48 Hoar*. 



CAPS ULES 



1 



f 



Superior to Copaiba, Capehs or Injection 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing. 
WriXe for prloes. 

Bhebder and SpoitTSMAN, 96 Q eary Stree 
San Franoisoo, Cal. 



16 



[January 20, 1906 



tELEPHONEi 

South 640 




ORSE BOOTS 



E PEER OF ALL AMMUNITI OilN S 1 



yaps 

I T H 
I 

I Terrific Force 
! 

L 



Write for Catalog 



E. E. DRAKE, Manager 



Sure Fire I 



PACIFIC COAST DEPOT: 

86-88 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



i 



FOR ANY G-UN 

I s=j hsi, hht! 




W/Mf£Sm 



WERE AWARDED 1 HE 



ONLY GRAND PRIZE 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



DU PONT SMOKELESS 



Id the lead as usual. 



The Official Records show that 
High Average for the year of 1905 

THE REAL WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP 

was won by 
Mr. Fred Gilbert 
who broke 95 a per cent of ihe 

17,065 targets he shot at. 
Mr. Gilbert, of course, used 

f» DU PONT SMOKELESS 



i 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg,, 49 Second St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



— N/\p— — 

LAFLIN& RAND BRANDS 
in 1905. 

HIGH AMATEUR AVERAGE 
for the Entire Season of 1905 
was won by 
Mr. J. W. Akard, Falrplay, Mo., 
who used 

"NEW SCHULTZE" 

and broke 94 pjr cent of all targets 
shot at in tournaments. 

LAFLIN & RAND BRANDS 

"INFALLIBLE" 
"NEW E. C. (IMPROVED)" 



M 



"NEW SCHULTZE 

also won THREE out of the 
FIRST FOUR HIGH AVERAGES 
for the Season of 1905 

LAFLIN A RAND POWDER CO. 
170 Broadway, New fork City. 



Clabrough, 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 



Golcher & Go. 

FISHING 




-Send for Onlnloeno 



^ Tackle 

538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



These are the Brands of 



SELBY 



FACTORY ... CUT! I ^ 

loaded . . o Pi LLL9 



PACIFIC 

CHALLENGE 

SUPERIOR 

EXOBLSIOR 



2 



[January 27, 19(k; 



$10 Payments Due February 1,1906 

ON YEARLINGS IN 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 5 — $ 7000 Guaranteed 

Nothing More to Pay Before 1907. 

For Foals 0/ Mares covered in 1904. To trot or pace at two and three years old. Entries closed October 15, 1904. Nothing 
More to Pay Before 1907, when your Foal can start in the Two-Year-Old Division. Stakes divided as follows: $3250 for 
Trotting Foals, $1750 fo" Pacing Foals, $800 to Nominators of Dams of Winners and $200 for Owners of Stallions. 



Substitutions. 



A Chance for Those Who Failed to Enter. 

A few of the original nominators of Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes for Foals of 1905 have ad vised 
us that, because of barrenness of the mare or death of the foal, they wish to dispose of their entries. 
If you own one or more whose dams you neglected tc name when entries closed, send $22, with Color, Sex and Breeding of 
the Foal, on or before February 1st next, which covers payments to February 1, 1907, and the few substitutions to be dis- 
posed of will be a warded in the order in which remittances are received. Prompt attention will secure for you this rich 
engagement. 



E. P. HEALD, President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Sec'y, 36 Geary St., S. F. 




HAWTHORNE 2:06 1-4 



BILLY BUCK 2:07 1-4 



KINNEY LOU 2:07 



KINNEY LOn 2:07 3 4 

THE FASTEST TROTTING SON 
OF THE CHAMPION SIRE 

Will make the Season of 1906, commencing February 1st, ending July 1st, at 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, SAN JOSE, GAL. 

TERMS S10O. $50 due when mare is bred and $50 payable when mare is known to be in foal, 

BUDD DOBLE, San Jose, Cal. 



RACING! 




New California Jockey cinD 
OAKLAND TRACK 

Six or More Races Each Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE 

BACKS COMMENCE AT 2 P. M. SBABP 

For Special Trains stopping at the Track take 
S. P. Ferry, foot of Market Street— leave at IS 
thereafter every twenty minutes. No smoking In 
last two cars, which are reserved for ladles and 
their escorts 

Returning, trains leave Track after fifth and 
last races. 

THOMAS B. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



PHENOL S0DIQUE 

lioals 

SORES, CUTS 
and BITES 

ON 

Man and Beast, 




M?4. 

AWXHW D 
BY T>lt ^ I^frl^ ^' FRANC I 1 -» 01 

PHENOL SODIUUE 

ID, «TAn 



For fnrther Information, pedigree and description address 
PHONE: JOHN 2481. 



NO OCSI1"'"*! 



Keep Handy for 
Accidents. 

Cure* 

MANCE & SCRATCHES 
on Dog*. 

For Sale 
By All Druggists. 

Recomm naed by this 
publication. 



HANCE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA. 



Mc Kinney, 2'AV/ 4 

World's Leading Sire cf Extreme Race Horse Speed. 

FEE, $500.00 

fJFees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No return privilege; 
but fee returned if mare fails to produce a foal. Keep, $2. per week. Our 
terms are rigidly adhered to in all cases, and we cannot deviate from them. 

McKinncy is now located at the farm. 1 nulet from Cuba. 

®lt? Empire GItttt IFarma, NEWYORK. 



Mention this journal 
when writing. 



McKINNEY DIRECTOR NUTWOOD 

THE STANDARD-BRED TROTTING STALLION 

UNIMAK 40936 

y Mc Kinney 2:11}; dam Twenty-Third by Director 2:17; second dam Nettie 
Nutwood (dam of Hillsdale 2:15}) by Nutwood COO. 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at PALO ALTO, Cal. 

Usual return privileges or money reiunded at the option of the owner of the mare. 

Terms, $40 for the Season 

To Close June 1st 



Address or apply to 



Exoellent Pasturage at Reasonable Rates. No 
barbed wire. Bsst of care taken of Mares, lo 
any manner Owners may desire. 



CAPT. C. H 

Box 1Q1, 



WILLIAMS, 

PALO ALTO, CAL.. 



WAYLAND W. 22516. 



Record 2:12$. 



One of the Leading Sires of 2:10 Performers of 1905. 

Sire of Bolivar 2:06%, leading money earning pacer of season 1905. Sire of 
Morosco 2.12. high, st class trotter on California circuit in 1904. Wayland W. is 
by Arthur Wilkes 2:2?, dam Lettie (dam of Wavland W. 2-1°% Welcome 210% 
Maud Singleton 2:28) by Wayland Forrest. Although Wavland W. has never' been 
mated with mares by Electioneer, Director. Nutwood. Sultan. Stamboul. Anteeo or 
any of our great sires, he is the sire of Bolivar 2:06%, Nellie R. 210 Arthur W 
2:11%, Morosco 2:12, John A. 2.12%, Forrest W. 2:14%, Leland W. 2:16 Al Sandy 
2:19%, Maud Sears 2:21. l'.onita Wilkes 2:26%. Wayland W. will make the 
Season of 1906 at SANTA ROSA, at McGregor & Hockins' Stables. 

W. C. HSLM4U. Owner. 

Terms $40 for the Season. Pasture $3.00 per month. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 y.o. Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 y.o. Stallion of 1905 

Two-year-old Becord 2:15 

Three-year-old Becord.. 2:12^ 
Trial In a Bace X:10'A 



WINNER OF HARTFORD FUTURITY (88500) FOB 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12J£ Is by Expedition 2:15* by Electioneer 125; dam Bon Mot by Erin 2M\; 
second dam Farce 2:29« by Prlnoeps536: third dam Roma by Golddust 150. For breeding, Individu- 
ality and racing qualities he is unsurpassed. 

Season of 1906 at AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANOELE8, 

where he will serve a limited number of mares. 

$S0 for the ^Pa<5nn USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGES, or money refunded should mare 
" ,v ovaauu. not prove ln toal A rare cna nce to breed good mares to an excep- 
tionally high-olass and highly bred young stallion. For further Information address 

J. O. OERBITY, 4607 Agricultural Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Ttio MoKinnoy Stallion 

KENNETH C. 2:17(11} 




Sired by McKINNEY: dam MOUNTAIN 
MAID (dam of Tom Carneal 2:08H) by 
Cresco 4908 (sire of Allle Cresco 2:13, etc ); 
next dam by Cloud. 

Will make the Season of 1906 at 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

KENNETH C. was one of the fastest of an 
exceptionally good lot of three-year-olds that 
raced In California ln 1905. He Is a splendid 
Individual, has size, style and quality, and 
the grandsons and granddaughters of McKin- 
ney through Kenneth C. will be equal to any 
ln the land. 



Terms 



( 830 for the Season, 
i 815 for Single Service. 



Address 



8. K. TBEFRY, Pleasanton. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



and type written ready for framin 
WritB for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



■SBBBBBBBBl 



January 27, 1906J 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 



Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast, 

OFFICB 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 447. 
fELEPHONB: Black 586. 



Terms— One Year S3, Six Months 81.75. Three Months SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered 
letter addressed to F. W. Kkllby, 36 Geary St., San Francisco, 
California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guar- 
antee of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 27, 1906 



Stallions Advertised. 



TROTTING BRED. 

BONNIE DIRECT 2:05% 

C. Li. Griffith, Pleasanton, Cal. 

BON VOYAGE 2:12%. .J. O. Gerrity, Los Angeles, Cal. 

CONSTRUCTOR 39569 James Smith, Vallejo, Cal. 

GRECO Chas. De Ryder, Pleasanton, Cal. 

IRAN ALTO 2:12%.. H. S. Hogoboom, Woodland, Cal. 

ISALCO H. Delaney, San Jose, Cal. 

KINNEY LOU 2:07% Budd Doble, San Jose 

KENNETH C. 2.17 S. K. Trefry, Pleasanton, Cal. 

McKINNEY 2:11% .. .Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

R. AMBUSH 2:14% G. W. Bonnell, Redlands, Cal. 

SIDMOOR 2:17% John Ott, Pacheco, Cal. 

STAR POINTER 1:59% 

Chas. De Ryder, Pleasanton, Cal. 

UN1MAK 40936.. Capt. C. H. Williams, Palo Alto, Cal. 
WAYLAND W. 2:12% 

W. C. Helman, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

ZOLOCK 2:05% H. Delaney, San Jose, Cal. 

HACKNEYS. 

GREEN'S RUFUS. .Bay wood Stud, San Mateo, Cal. 
SQUIRE OF CHESTER, Toghill Stud, Menlo Park, Cal. 
o 

California Stake Payments Due in 1906. 



Pacifio Breeders' Futurity Stakes. 

(Payments should be made to F. W. Kelley, secre- 
tary, 36 Geary street, San Francisco.) 

Stake No. 3, $6000, foals of 1903— $10 due April 1, 
1906, and starting payment of $50 on three-year-old 
trotters and $35 on three-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No. 4. $6000, foals of 1904— $10 due March 1, 
1906, and starting payment of $35 on two-year-old 
trotters and $25 on two-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No 5, $7000, foals of 1905— $10 due February 
1, 1906. 

Stake No. 6, $7000, foals of 1906— $5 due May 1, 
1906, and $5 due October 1, 1906. 

Stanford Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Stanford Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— $10 due June 
1. 1906, and starting payment of $20 ten days before 
State Fair opens. 

Stanford Stake of 1907, foals of 1904— $10 due June 
1, 1906. 

Occident Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Occident Stake of 1906, foals of 1903 — Starting pay- 
ment of $50 due 30 days before the race. 

o 

EASTERN HORSEMEN and managers of the 
Grand Circuit meetings are again discussing the ques- 
tion of shortening races, but while all are agreed that 
the old three-in-five system must be abolished, there 
seems to be much difference of opinion as to the best 
system to replace it with. The Grand Circuit stew- 
ards failed to agree upon a plan that would be uni- 
form all through the circuit, and each association will 
adopt the plan that in its opinion promises the largest 
list of entries. The action of the drivers and trainers 
last year in agreeing to refuse entries to all races 
advertised on the three-in-five plan has compelled 
the associations to shorten their races, and the prob- 
ability is that within a year or two a system will de- 
velop that will be popular with horsemen and the pub- 
lic as well and be generally adopted. Out here on 
the Pacific Coast there is but little talk of changing 
from the old three-in-five rule, but there is no doubt 
but owners and trainers would welcome a change. 
The very limited racing season here makes the old 
racing plan less objectionable than it would be if 
there were a circuit of three or four months' dura- 
tion. Seven or eight years ago there was quite a de- 
mand for shorter races, and several of the plans now 
heralded as new in the east were tried, but none 



proved popular and the old three-in-five plan was 
resumed at the Breeders' and other important meet- 
ings. The California State Fair has for years had a 
rule, however, which sends all horses to the stable 
at the end of three heats that have not won a heat. 
This has been the rule in all the State Fair harness 
races except the Occident and Stanford Stakes, and 
this year it was extended to them, such a condition 
having been added to those governing the renewals of 
those stakes closing for entry this year. It would 
doubtless meet with the approbation of a majority 
of horsemen were something like the Buffalo plan 
adopted by the California associations. In this plan 
there are but three heats and each heat is a race, 
with four moneys in each heat. Faster time and 
shorter races would be popular and doubtless draw a 
larger attendance. 

o 

PLEASANTON TRACK has never had as many 
horses working over it as are now stabled there. A 
few days since Mr. Ronan, the owner of this favorite 
training place, completed a new building containing 
fifty box stalls and all were occupied as soon as the 
last nail was driven. There are now over two hun- 
dred horses stabled at the track, and fifty or more 
that get their work over it find quarters in private 
stables in the neighborhood. The heavy rain of two 
weeks ago, which lasted eight days, did not keep the 
horses off the track an hour after the rain ceased, 
although there was a precipitation of eight inches at 
that point. It is a wonderfully well drained track, 
and the soil is different from that found anywhere 
else in California. 

o 

THE BLOOD OF CHAMPIONS. 

On the front page of this paper appears this week 
a half tone reproduction of a photograph taken last 
Monday at Pleasanton, which is a fair portrait of a 
remarkably well bred stallion. Greco is his name; 
he is owned by Mr. H. Brace of Humboldt county, and 
he will make a season at Pleasanton this year under 
the management of Chas. De Ryder. 

There is not another stallion in the world bred like 
him. His sire is McKinney, champion sire of extreme 
speed, with seven 2:10 trotters to his credit, and 
thirty-nine 2:15 performers, all with race records. 
The dam of Greco is Aileen 2:26 by Anteeo 2:16%, one 
of Electioneer's best sons, and his second dam is the 
famous mare Lou Milton, dam of the world's cham- 
pion trotter, Lou Dillon 1:58%. Lou Dillon is by 
Milton Medium, son of Happy Medium, sire of Nancy 
Hanks 2:04. Greco is a trotter himself and a good 
one. He never started in but one race, which he 
won, taking a mark of 2:32 over a poor track in 
Humboldt county, but he has a very high rate of 
speed and worked a mile in 2:20 at Pleasanton with 
but little work. Greco will, while in Mr. De Ryder's 
care, be given sufficient training to take a low record, 
which he is certainly capable of doing. Greco has 
sired a few colts but has heretofore made but very 
limited seasons in the stud. He has proven himself 
not only a sure foal getter, but a sire of speed as 
well, every colt that has been broken showing speed 
at the trot. Two oi his yearlings, the oldest of his 
get, were started last year in races of half mile 
heats at the Humboldt county fair, and both won in 
good time. 

Greco is a very handsome individual, well matched 
and well proportioned, with fine style and action. He 
is a square gaited trotter and has shown quarters 
already in 31 seconds. He is a glossy black, with 
excellent disposition and every quality that denotes 
high breeding and race horse speed. 

A horse whose sire is the champion sire of fast 
trotters and whose grandam produced the world's 
champion is well enough bred to attract the best 
mares in any country. Greco's dam, Aileen 2:26 by 
Anteeo, is a great brood mare. She has produced two 
with standard records — Mowitza 2:20%, and Sister 
2:20, and the latter is the dam of that fast pacing 
mare Sally Pointer 2:11. It will be seen that on 
both sides of his pedigree Greco has producing blood 
that is most fashionable. Look over his advertise- 
ment in this issue, and write to Mr. De Ryder at 
Pleasanton in regard to him. 

o 

A GOOD SON OF SIDNEY. 

Until Lou Dillon set the world's trotting record at 
1:58%, sons of Sidney were not as popular in this 
State as their merits justified. Sidney was a most 
remarkable horse and had Count Valensin lived his 
list of standard performers would have probably been 
nearer the 200 mark than any stallion has yet reached. 
A son of Sidney that was a wonderful colt trotter, 
has a record of 2:17% and is one of the sweetest 
gaited pacers ever foaled is Sidmoor, whose dam was 
by the Grand Moor and grandam by Echo 462, thus 
representing a combination of great race blood. Sid- 
moor is owned by Mr. John Ott of Pacheco. He has 
had but very limited opportunities in the stud, but 
has sired Enoch 2:12%, General 2:14%, Teddy the 
Roan 2:17%, Little Miss 2:17%, and that fast green 
pacer Tip Oquando that has paced a trial mile in 
2.09%. There are several others of Sidmoor's get 
with standard records and fast trials. At the Pleas- 
anton track at the present time are three without 
records that can show 2:10 speed, and all are good 
sized, stoutly built and level headed horses. Sid- 
moor seems to sire speed from everything he is bred 
to and he Is "the poor man's horse" as his service 
fee Is but $30 for the season and his colts sell readily 
at good prices. Look over his advertisement. 



THE DILLON FAMILY AT PLEASANTON. 



Since the palmy days of Palo Alto Stock Farm 
there has probably never been twenty- live colts and 
fillies by one horse put into the hands of a trainer 
at the same time in California until Sterling R. Holt 
came here from Indiana a few weeks ago, purchased 
that many Sidney Dillons and put them in Millard 
Sanders' charge. They are now at Pleasanton and 
if this famous two-minute trainer and driver don't 
give Sidney Dillon a boom with them this year it 
will be because sickness or accident prevents. The 
eight yearlings and some of the two-year-olds are 
quartered at the old Valensin place, now owned Dy 
Mr. F. H. Jermyn, a wealthy coal operator of Penn- 
sylvania, who has purchased it for a country home 
and is fitting it up in first-class shape. Sanders feels 
quite at home when he is on this farm, for nearly 
all the barns and box stalls were constructed under 
his supervision when he was making fame and money 
for Count Valensin with the young Sidneys. No 
trainer has ever beaten his record for giving colts and 
fillies champion records. He is putting the young 
Sidney Dillons in order to ship to Indianapolis about 
May 1st. The little fellows are given a run in the 
rich new grass every day, and put in box stalls at 
night, two in each stall for company. They are fed 
crushed grain and alfalfa hay, and are already be- 
ginning to take on flesh, and the men who take care 
of them say they can almost see them grow over 
night. At the Pleasanton track nearly a dozen of 
the older ones are stabled and are being jogged and 
put in shape for fast miles they will be asked to 
go later on. The full list of those purchased from 
the Santa Rosa Stock Farm by Mr. Holt is as fol- 
lows: 

Carlocita, bay filly, foaled 1902, pacer with a record 
of 2:24%. Her dam is Carlotta Wilkes, dam of three 
in the list. Mr. Turner stepped Carlocita a mile in 
2:14%, a half in 1:051/4, a quarter in 30%, and an 
eighth in 14% seconds, a 1:54 gait. 

Carrie Dillon 2:24%, chestnut filly foaled 1903, dam 
Biscari, dam of seven in the list by Director. Mr. 
Turner drove her a mile in 2:16%, half in 1:06%, and 
qurater in 31% seconds. 

Kate Dillon, chestnut filly, foaled 1903, dam Roblet 
2:12 by Robin, dam of Bonalet 2:09%, champion three- 
year-old pacing filly. Kate Dillon has been a mile in 
2:21%, a half in 1:08, a quarter in 31% and an eighth 
in 15% seconds. 

Lollie Dillon, chestnut filly, foaled 1903, dam Car- 
lotta Wilkes. Has shown a mile in 2:38, and a quarter 
in 37 seconds. Is paid upon in the Occident Stake 
and Turner says is the best gaited and best headed 
one he ever saw. 

Clay Dillon, bay gelding foaled 1903. dam Pansy, 
dam of four In the list, by Cassius M. Clay Jr. Clay 
Dillon has trotted a mile in 2:45% and a quarter in 
38 seconds. 

Rose Dillon, bay filly foaled 19C2, dam Russie Rus- 
sell by L. W. Russell. Has shown a quarter in 40 
seconds. 

Miss Sidney Dillon, chestnut filly foaled 1902, dam 
Pansy, dam of four, has been a mile in 2:35, and 
quarter in 51 seconds. 

The following five foals of 1904: 

Santa Rosa Dillon, bay colt, dam Stamboulita 2:27 
by Stamboul. 

Sonoma Dillon, chestnut colt, dam By By by Nut- 
wood. 

Adioo Dillon, bay filly, dam Adioo by Guy Wilkes. 
Routh Dillon, bay filly, dam Russie Russell by L 
W. Russell. 

Sadie Dillon, bay filly, dam Biscari by Director. 

Chestnut filly, dam By Guy by Guy Wilkes, second 
dam By By by Nutwood. 

The following eight foals of 1905: Chestnut filly, 
dam By By; chestnut filly, dam Carlotta Wilkes;' 
chestnut colt, dam Mildred Russell; bay colt, dani 
Adioo; bay colt, dam Guycara; bay filly, dam Viola; 
chestnut filly, dam Russie Russell. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

O. J.— Altimont is a registered horse. His number 
is 985, and he is by Almont 33, out of Belle Miller by 
Blackwood 74, grandam by Mambrino Chief 11. He is 
the sire of the dam of Jasper Ayers 2:09. San Fran- 
cisco Patchen was by Geo. M. Patchen Jr. 31, but we 
have no record of his breeding any further. He is not 
registered, nor had he a standard record. The mare 
you refer to can be registered under rule 4; which 
reads as follows. "A mare sired by a registered stan- 
dard trotting horse can be registered provided she is 
the dam of two trotters with records of 2:30. 



A. Rosa, Morgan Hill.— Vohlcer is a bay horse 
foaled is:i7. by imported st. George, dam Fanfare by 
imported King Ernest. He was bred by Mrs. J. B. 
Ferguson. Kingston Stud, Kentucky. He won seven 
races as a two-year-old, two as a three-year-old, two 
as a four-year-old, five as a five-year-old. He was 
second and third many times and was a good race 
horse. As a six-year-old he started three times and 
was second in one race and unplaced in the others. 



Subscriber, Davisville.— Jenny D. Is not registered, 
and as her sire is not registered it will be impossible 
to register her. 

FAIR DATES CLAIMED. 

At the meeting of. the North Pacific Fair Associa- 
tion held last week at Portland the following dates 
were agreed upon: 

Seattle '. Sept. 3 to 8 

Salem Sept. 10 to 15 

North Yakima Sept. 17 to 22 

Spokaiie . . : Sept. 24 to 29 

Walla Walla Oct. 1 to 6 

Lewiston Oct. 8 to 13 

Everett was given the privilege to select such dates 
as they may decide on. 



(The iUccfccr mt£* JSym-temmt 



[January 27, 1906 



CAREER OF STAR POINTER. 

Star Pointer 1:59%, the first horse to beat two min- 
utes, is holding- levees every day at Pleasanton. Every 
horseman who visits the track has to have a look 
at the champion, and Bert Webster, who has taken 
charge of him for Chas. DeRyder, never led out a 
horse that he was prouder of. Star Pointer is a 
walking — we should say, pacing — advertisement of the 
glorious climate of California. He looks and feels like 
a two-year-old. his coat shines like satin, while he is 
in perfect condition. As the regular announcement of 
this grand horse appears in this issue of the Breeder 
and Sportsman, a short account of his career will be 
of interest at this time. He was bred by H. P. 
Pointer of Spring Hill, Tennessee, and foaled in 1889. 
He was purchased from Mr. Pointer by Mr. J. W. 
Titley of Chtcora, Pa., when a colt and placed in E. 
F. Geer's hands for training and made his debut on 
the turf in 1894, starting in two races that year. His 
first race was on August 20, at Washington Park. 
Chicago, where he defeated a field of eleven starters 
in straight heats, time 2:12%, 2:11% and 2:12. He 
next started at Fort Wayne, Ind., just one week from 
that date, winning the first two heats in 2:13% and 
2:12%. but in the third heat threw a shoe and was 
distanced. 

In 1896 he was sold at W. B. Fasig's sale at Cleve- 
land, Ohio, being purchased by Smith & Mills, of 
Host. 'ii. Mass., for $5,000, and was placed in the hands 
of Dave J. McClary. but owing to his being with a 
trainer not familiar with him, and not being properly 
balanced during the early part of the season, he did 
not race very well in his first few races that year, 
but. toward the later part of the season came Into 
form and displayed the phenomenal speed and race- 
horse qualities that earned for him the world's cham- 
pionship later. At Medford, Mass., he paced three 
heats in a winning race in 2:02%, 2:03% and 2:03%, 
which still stands as the world's race record for three 
consecutive heats. At Readville. Mass., he won in 
2:04>4, 2:04% and 2:05%. At Lexington he won in 
2:03, 2:04% and 2.06%, also at Philadelphia in 2:04%, 
2:05% and 2:06. He started in eight races in 1896, 
winning four of them. 

In March, 1897, he again passed under the hammer 
at W. B. Fasig & Co.'s. Madison Square Garden, New 
York, being purchased by James A. Murphy, of Chi- 
cago, 111., for $15,600. He was again trained and 
driven by Mr. McClary, starting in public sixteen 
times during that season, ten of which were races 
and of which he won eight, six being exhibition miles. 
He won races at Hartford, Chicago, Cleveland, Med- 
ford, Mass., Indianapolis, Springfield, 111.. Hartford, 
Conn., and Chicago. He started at Buffalo to reduce 
his record of 2:02% and succeeded In cutting it to 
2:01%. On August 28, he started at Readville, Mass.. 
against that time and paced a mile in 1:59 '4, the 
world's record for a harness horse, and marked Star 
Pointer as the first horse that ever trotted or paced 
a mile in less than two minutes. The quarters of that 
mile were paced as follows: 30 seconds, 59% seconds. 
1:29, 1.59%. 

It was Mr. Murphy's intention to have Star Pointel 
used exclusively for the purpose of reducing his own 
record in 1898. as well as the wagon record, and there 
is not a particle of doubt that the great stallion could 
have accomplished all that was expected of him if he 
had been favored with ordinary advantages. There 
must be no disturbing factors for record breaking per- 
formances The condition of the track, atmospheric 
conditions, etc., must all be satisfactory. 

On six QCCfuStonB in 1898 set for trials against time, 
were the weather conditions unfavorable, but not- 
withstanding this fact Star Pointer made a wonderful 
showing. At Peoria, 111., on July 14th, he started to 
break the track record of 2:05 and reduced it to 
2:02%. At Detroit, on July 22d, he reduced the track 
record from 2:02% to 2:01%. At Columbus, on Aug- 
ust 6th, he equaled his own world's record of 1:59%. 
on a track conceded by all to be more than a second 
slow. At Joliet, 111.. August 8th, he reduced the track 
record from 2:02% to 1:59%. on a cold, windy day. 
At Readville, on September 1st, he paced a mile in 
1:59%, finishing in the rain. September 9th, at Hart- 
ford, he reduced the track record from 2.03% to 2:00%, 
and at Philadelphia, Pa., September 17th, he set the 
track record at 1:59%. 

He paced seven public miles in 1898 in the average 
time of two minutes. 

Mr. Murphy becoming disgusted with the fact that 
the fates seemed determined not to favor him even 
with one favorable opportunity of giving Star Pointer 
a fair chance of performing under conditions con- 
ducive to pacing a mile to his real limit, consigned 
him to Fasig-Tipton Co s New York sale that fall 
and he was purchased by Mr. White of Cleveland, 
Ohio, in November for $15,000. 

Mr. White placed him in the stud at his farm and 
Star Pointer is now the sire of fourteen standard 
performers, of which four have records below 2:09, 
the fastest being Morning Star that has a regular 
race record of 2:04%, and a matinee wagon record of 
2:03 made in 1905. Morning Star was sold for $10,- 
500 at the Old Glory sale last month. As a sire that 
will give the California pacing families the ability to 
carry the great speed some of them possess to the end 
of the mile and the end of the race no matter how 
long drawn out it may be, Star Pointer will fill the 
bill. The Hal family of which he is the greatest 
member, is filled with thoroughbred blood and has 
wonderful speed, great power and extreme endurance. 
He will be bred to some of the best bred mares in 
California during the two years he is to be kept in 
this State. 



THEY ARE ALIVE UP NORTH. 

The members of the North Pacific Fair Circuit are 
very much alive. They are not sitting down and 
waiting for something to turn up, but are doing the 
turning themselves. From the Rural Spirit of last 
week we take the following: 

At the annual meeting of the North Pacific Fair As- 
sociation held in the Rural Spirit office, Portland. 
Ore., on Wednesday, January 10th, 1906, the following 
members were represented: Oregon State Fair by W. 
H. Downing; King County Fair, A. T. Van De Van- 
ter; Snohomist Agricultural Association, Dan Currie; 
Washington State Fair, G. A. Graham; Spokane In- 
terstate Fair, Robert H. Cosgrove: Lewiston-Clarks- 
ton Fair, C. W. Mounts; Walla Walla County Fair, 
A. C. Vandevanter. 

A. T. Van De Vanter called the meeting to order in 
the absence of the president. W. H. Wehrung, who 
came in later. Upon motion the following commit- 
tees were appointed upon dates: Downing, Van De 
Vanter, Currie. Graham, Cosgrove, Mounts and Van- 
devanter. After the usual arguments the following 
dates were agreed upon: 

Seattle, September 3d to 8th; Salem, September 
10th to 15th; North Yakima, September 17th to 22d; 
Spokane, September 24th to 29th; Walla Walla, Octo- 
ber 1st to 6th; Lewiston, October 8th to 13th. Spo- 
kane was given the privilege to continue their fair 
and running races one week longer, but without har- 
ness events and live stock. Everett was granted the 
right to select such dates as they see lit without vio- 
lating any rules of the association. 

The committee appointed on early closing stakes 
reported the following list, which .were authorized 
by the representatives present and confirmed by the 
meeting as a whole: 

Salem. 

Two-year-old pace $ 400.00 

Three-year-old pace 500.00 

2:25 pace 1000.00 

2.15 pace 2000.00 

2:10 pace '■ ■ • 700.00 

2- year trot . . 400.00 

3- year trot 500.00 

2:27 trot 1000.00 

2:17 trot 2000.00 

2:12 trot 700.00 

Seattle. 

2:20 trot $1000.00 

2:20 pace 1000.00 

North Yakima. 

2:15 trot $1000.00 

2:10 pace 1000.00 

Spokane. 

2:16 trot $1000.00 

2:10 pace 1000.00 

Walla Walla. 

2.17 trot $1000.00 

2:15 race 1000.00 

Lewiston. 

2:15 trot * 500.00 

2:10 pace 500.00 

Everett. 

2:40 trot * 500.00 

•) <>5 trot 500.00 

£! 25 pace 500.00 

2:10 pace 800.00 

The secretary was authorized to advertise the above 
slaked to close May lath. 19(16. and to publish the 
same in pamphlet form as "A Stake Book;" to use his 
best efforts to secure entries for same. He was fur- 
ther ordered to visit training stables in California in 
the interest of this circuit, and to pro rata the ex- 
pense of such advertising and traveling expense 
among the present members. 

The rule barring hobbles on colts that race on 
this circuit was abolished. 

The secretary was authorized to appoint a judge Tor 
the entire circuit, and W. E. Wood of Norborne, Mo., 
was recommended, if terms are right. 

The following amendments were made to the by- 
laws: That no member of this association shall be 
allotted dates for a longer period than one week for 
harness events and live stock shows without the con- 
sent of a two-thirds vote of the members present at 
the regular annual meeting. 

That every member of this association shall adver- 
tise at least two harness events for each day's racing. 

JOHN BRADBURN'S BOOK COMPLETED. 

Mr. John Bradburn, superintendent at Village Farm. 
East Aurora, N. Y., for the last twenty-five years of 
its existence, and now superintendent of the Ideal 
Stock Farm of the same place, has completed his 
long-promised book— "Breeding and Developing the 
Trotter." Mr. Bradburn commenced writing his book 
several years ago, but had to cease work owing to 
ill health. Because of the wide and varied experience 
of its author, Mr. Bradburn's work will doubtless be- 
come an authority on its subject. The book will be 
published in March or April. Arthur Caton Thomas. 
New York representative of the American Horse 
Breeder, was selected by Mr. Bradburn to edit his 
volume. The subjects treated are. "The Village 
Farm Theory of Breeding," "Founding a Stock Farm," 
Purchase and Care of Stallion," "Purchase and Care 
of Brood Mare," "Breaking and Training Colts," "De- 
veloping Speed." "Care of Feet," "Management of a 
Stock Farm," etc. 



ZOLOCK 2:0514 AT SAN JOSE. 



The State Agricultural Society of Iowa has a sur- 
plus of $45,000 in the treasury. And Iowa gives one 
of those old-fashioned fairs, with races on a half 
mile track, and caters to the farmers and breeders 
of the State and not to the bookmakers. 



The long shaft, low seat, pneumatic speed cart that 
has been designed especially for track use by S. Too- 
mey & Co., the world renowned sulky and cart build- 
ers, can be seen at O'Brien & Sons, Golden Gate ave- 
nue and Polk street, who are Coast agents for these 
excellent vehicles. 

■ — o — 

Jackson's Napa Soda cleanses the stomach and 
renders the eye clear. 



The beautiful Agricultural Park, San Jose, is to 
have the distinction of being the headquarters during 
the breeling season of 1906, of the two fastest entire 
sons of the great McKinney. Kinney Lou 2:07%, the 
fastest trotting son of McKinney, is at home there, 
Rudd Doble having located his champion there over 
two years ago, and now Henry Delaney announces 
that the pacing stallion Zolock 2:05% will be located 
there during the season of 1906. 

Zolock is as well known .to the breeders of the 
Pacific Coast as any stallion in the country and is 
admired by one and all not only for his grand con- 
formation and great speed, but also for his blood lines 
and he is one of the best bred McKinneys living 
His dam is that great mare Gazelle, whose trotting 
record is 2:11%, and who has not only produced 
Zolock 2:05% but is the dam of that great trotter 
Zephyr 2.07%, winner of $8000 on the Grand Circuit 
last season. Gazelle Is by Gossiper 2:14% and her 
dam is Gipsey, dam of Gazelle 2:11%, the three-year- 
old pacing whirlwind Delilah 2:14%, the good trotter 
Ed. Winship 2:15, Willetts 2:17 matinee record, and 
iJixie B. 2:2«. Gipsey is by Gen. Booth 2:30%. son 
ofoldfieo.M.Patchen30.and her dam was Echo" B elle 
a daughter of Echo 462, the next dam being a daugh- 
ter of the Oregon running horse Lummox, and the 
next a daughter of old Gray Eagle. Anyone who will 
study the blood lines of Zolock cannot help being im- 
pressed with, the lines of producing blood that come 
to him through channels noted for gameness and en- 
durance, as well as from families that are noted for 
good looks and great race horse qualities. 

Zolock has six in the list, Ambush (3) 2- 14% De- 
l''tr,/ 3) 2:14,/ =' IJ > sta » d er 2.14%, Sherlock Holme* 
2:15%, Dixie S. 2:27 and Conchita 2:29. In addition 
these three-year-olds by him have made the follow- 
ing ne in trials: Lillian Zolock 2:14, Kinney Woo<4 
2.15, Cleopatra 2:15, Red Lock 2:18, Zollie 2:18, Inaug- 
uretta 2:22. Hylock 2:25, Majella 2:25, Adalante 2:26, 
Bolock 2:27. Two-year-olds that have been given 
trials are Wenja 2:24, Bonnie June 2.27, Isalco 2:30. 
and twelve others now in training that can step quar- 
ters from 33 to 36 seconds. All his colts are good 
headed and there has never been one that went lame. 
Every colt by him that has been trained has shown 
speed without one exception. Zolock stands 16 hands 
high and is a grand individual in every way. Those 
who attended the meetings at Fresno, Santa Rosa and 
Sacramento last summer know how he could play 
with the high class field of pacers he met at these 
meetings. His two heats at Fresno in 2:05% are 
proof that he has gameness as well as speed. His 
service fee will be $75 for the season. 

Mr. Delaney will also have Isalco, a son of Zolock, 
in the stud at $25. This colt is a full brother to that 
great three-year-old filly Delilah 2:14%. He is now 
three years old and the picture of his sire in every 
way except he is not as large. His dam is Gipsey, 
referred to above, who has five standard performers 
to her credit, three of which have records of 2:15 or 
better. Gipsey is also the grandam of that wonder- 
fully fast colt Col. Green that has a trial record of 
2:10%. 

Mr. Delaney's address will be at the Race Track. 
San Jose, where he invites breeders to call and see 
his horses. 

1 — o 

INTERESTING ITEMS FROM MONTANA. 

The Montana Circuit, as announced in the Breeder 
and Sportsman last week, appeals directly to the har- 
ness horse owners and trainers of California, and 
many of them have already expressed the intention of 
visiting the copper country during the coming sum- 
mer and starting their horses for the many big purses 
that will be offered. From the Stockman and Farmer, 
published at Helena, we take the following items of 
interest in regard to this circuit of ten weeks and 
other matters of news to horsemen: 

Every association represented at the conference of 
secretaries pledged at least two stakes of $1000 each, 
and the larger ones, Butte. Helena, Bozeman and Mis- 
soula, will give one each day. Hutte has promised 
eight at least, and possibly ten in the harness division 
alone. 

The classes adopted will be uniform, so far as 
possible. Butte, Bozeman and the State Fair have 
decided upon 2:14 and 2:18 pacing stakes, 2:16 and 
2:20 trotting stakes, and these three tracks and prob- 
ably some others will give stakes for three-year-old 
trotters and pacers. 

Miles City wants a date, although their fair has not 
as yet been organized. If possible they will get one, 
when they get further along. 

Havre is also making arrangements for a summer 
meeting. 

The early closing stakes for the Montana Circuit 
will be announced February 1st, or before. 

Dr. Galbraith says Butte is ready for a big meet- 
ing and that the business men are taking much in- 
terest in the matter. A number of Butte men are buy- 
ing harness horses, and the summer's matinee meet- 
ings will be interesting. 

There will be a spring sale of young standard-bred 
horses in Butte in April, in which several Montana 
breeding plants will be represented. 

W. B. George says Billings will have the greatest 
fair in her history. Farmers, stockmen and the en- 
tire business interests of the valley are taking an 
interest, and a great showing will be made of products. 

Lewistown people are planning a fair this year, 
for the reason that there is greater inquiry about the 
possibilities of the Judith Kasin than ever before. 

Great Falls people are closing arrangements for the 
mile track belonging to the Couch estate, and Mr. 
Jensen says the matter has been practically closed. 
It is claimed that Great Falls was not able to offer 
good racing for the lack of a good track. 



January 27, 1916 • 



5 



THOROUGHBRED DEPARTMENT. 



(By Ralph H. Tozer.) 
Walter Jennings certainly did change his brand of 
luck on the 1st day of January, 1906, putting that 
labeled "bad" away back in the darkest part of the 
store-room and taking out a bright, brand-new pack- 
age marked "good." and using it right away. The 
result need not be told. He won the New Year's 
Handicap with Proper and follows January 20th with 
a win by the same horse in the Lissak Handicap, 
worth $2820 to the youthful turfman from "Show 
Me" State. That Proper was a good horse last Sat- 
urday was shown by his glossy coat, his coltish and 
kickish ways and his evident desire to break all pre- 
vious running records. He landed a solar plexus blow 
on Kearcatcher at the post, and "the Bear" didn't look 
any too good anyhow. Well. Proper got away "on 
the fly," Red Leaf flatfooted, Bearcatcher tangled up. 
Jake Sanders came pretty close to not getting off at 
all, and Proper won by a Fitzsimmons head in the 
hardesl kind a drive with Red Leaf, while Jake 
Sanders, clearly the best horse in the race, was third, 
about half a length further away. Bearcatcher needs 
a rest or a claw-sharpening, winding up a poor 
fourth. The track was deep and at about its heaviest 
stage, and Lubin ought to have made a better show- 
ing, even though he likes a lengthier journey. 

\* * * ■ - 

Up to last Monday Barney S<-hreil»*e-ly&'''W|i , 'J&50v- 
ning owners with $21,650 on the rigm 's'iff!' -of* flu- 
ledger. W. B. Jennings was second with $11,331, then 
came W. W. Elliott with $7,516, the Keene Brothers 
with $6,730. T. G. Ferguson with $6,436 and P. Ryan 
with $5,012. These were the only owners that had 
reached or gone over the $5,000 mark. 

* * • 

Jockey Herman Radtke remained over to ride Red 
Leaf in the Lissak Handicap last Saturday, and piloted 
six winners during the week, Robinson leading with 
seven winners in the six days, Bill Knapp tying with 
six. The record up to last Monday of those boys 
with ten or more wins to their record, was: 

Un- 

Jockey — Won. Second. Third, placed. 

Radtke 59 37 38 115 

Knapp 43 33 27 99 

McBride 39 27 20 99 

Fountain 30 33 32 88 

T. Clark 23 14 21 118 

L. Williams 20 19 17 77 

Robinson 20 26 24 123 

Loague 16 23 25 99 

Schade 10 4 4 53 

* * * 

The Trojan, a recent purchase by Barney Schreiber, 
broke a leg in the last race on Monda | last, and had 
to be destroyed. He was by the excellent Bend Or 
horse. Golden Garter, out of Troyene, and would prob- 
ably have been used at the stud by Mr. S., Bend Or 
blood being close to the top in both this country and 
England just now. Radtke was badly shaken. Up. by 
the fall, but proved not to have been serjottsly'l in-? 
jured. Goodchild also had a narrow esca'pt? <ih Ehel 
Thatcher. 

* * * 

C. T. Henshall's horses won twice on Monday and 
on Tuesday also, and as Mr. H. is quite a bettoT, the 
bookies had very unpleasant afternoons of it. 

* * * 

The weights for the Burns Handicap, to be run 
this afternoon, were given out last Monday -by Hancii- 
capper Egbert, and are as follows, only the ones con- 
sidered to have a chance of winning being included 
in this list: : 

Proper 122 Andrew Mack 10S 

Eugenia Burch 120 Ginette 108 

Lubin 119 Neva Lee .107 

W. R. Condon 117 D'Arkle 107 

Bearcatcher 116 Lord Badge 106 

Dr. Leggo 114 Corn Blossom 106 

San Nicolas 114 Sir Brillar 106 

Reservation Ill Beknighted 106 

Orchan 110 Lady Goodrich 106 

Dr. Gardner 110 Elie 105 

Gregor K 109 Good Luck 105 

Rubric 109 Gorgalette 105 

Graziallo 109 Red Leaf 100 

Jake Sanders 109 Geranium 100 

Soufriere 108 Memories 100 

True Wing 108 W. H. Carey 100 

Bragg 108 

Should the weather and track be fast it should 
be a great race between Eugenia Burch. Proper. Dr. 
Leggo, Rubric, Soufriere, True Wing, Ginette, Neva 
Lee, Lord Badge, Corn Blossom, Lady Goodrich. Good 
Luck and Memories. If the track is heavy Lubin, 
Jake Sanders, Orchan, Tregor K. and Red Leaf would 
have a good chance of mining, while Eugenia Burch 
is not a "mudder," neither is San Nicolas. W. R. 
Condcn has not started this season, and may cut quite 
a figure in the stake, which he won last year. Bear- 
catcher appears to have completely lost his form, and 
Graziallo's last few races were anything hut impres- 
sive. The distance seems a little far for Dr. Gardner, 
who is just about thirty-six months old now. Dr. 
Leggo an1 Soufriere can "go the route," and can be 
counted upon to give a good account of ti.^mselves. 
Neva Lee is an extremely fleet mare. Corn Blossom 
Is very speedy, Beknighted is a much improved horse, 
Lady Goodrich is fast and game, Elie was good enough 
a year ago to beat Dr. Leggo in record time, Good 
Luck won "five straights" at Los Angeles, Red Leaf 
ran a winning race last Saturday with Proper, while 
Memories, at 100 pounds, should be a keen contender, 
no matter what the condition of the track may be. 
Andrew Mack was a sweet horse over a soft track 
last season, and Sir Brillar, who has now rounded 
into hi? best form, was good enough to finish fourth 
in the Brooklyn Handicap of 1905, when he was a 
three-year-old. All in all, it looks, "on paper," to be 



an equitable handicap indeed, and as a good field is 
certain to contest for the $10,000 hung up, an inter- 
esting race is sure to result. 

* • * . '» 
Starter "Dick" Dwyer ought to be a very proud man 
over the reception accorded him upon his return to 
Emeryville. His popularity, as a man as well as 
racing official, seems to be unbounded, and I believe 
he richly merits it. Dwyer was a good jockey, and 
when he became too heavy to ride came to be" regarded 
as a clever trainer of race horses. In fact, he has 
tried to excel in any branch of the race horse business 
in which he was engaged, and has the entire confi- 
dence of the public, his employers and the riders 
that come up to the barrier. May the genial "Dick" 
live to lift the webbing for many years to come. 
< . * * 

Seattle is to have a new race track, the cost of which 
will be $500,000. 'tis said. The owners of the fine 
plant in use for the past four or five years have 
offered the principal owners of the new place a hand- 
some sum not to build, but they won't "come off the 
perch.' 1 It is claimed the new track will have unsur- 
passed transportation facilities and can be reached 
by several lines of cars in much less time than can 
the King County course. 

Elmer Laurence writes the Chronicle that there is 
no chance of holding a meeting for the gallopers only 
at Butte. It seems the driving club folks have a 
Please on the Daly track at Untie and are nut disposed 
to give up the course to the runners for any length 
of time. Butte's most successful meetings in the past 
were of the "mixed" order, so that it might be well 
to give a meeting that would suit all the factions. 
Laurence seems to believe it "no cinch" that Denver 
will have a meeting in 1906, but she generally has 
a mixed one. 

MEDIUM SIZED SADDLE HORSE IS BEST. 



. All - . S. M. Yager, one of the leading saddle horse 
breeders and experts of Paris. Missouri, recently wrote 
as follows iii regard to this breed of horses for the 
Kentucky Farmer and Breeder: 

The ideal saddle horse, the kind that has been bred 
up to the art of perfection, possessing a smooth, neat 
form' arid fine features, nice, trim set of limbs, well 
muscled, good feet, fine head and neck, mane and tail, 
fine coat of hair, pleasant, kind disposition and noble 
countenance, with the style he puts on in the show- 
ring and the pride he takes in showing his airy, 
graceful movements and his bold, dashing rack, is the 
grandest performer and the most beautiful horse that 
walks the face of the earth. The saddle horse, like 
all other breeds of horses, has its established size 
and type. The most successful show horse, as a rule, 
is the medium sized, medium boned horse. He pos- 
sesses more quality .style, action and stamina, which 
makes, him the best of show horses. The medium 
: sized saddle horse ranges in height from 15.1 to 15.3 
jj»nds high. There are very few extra show horses 
over 15.3 hands high, the large majority ranging from 
15.1 to 15.2% hands high. Though some few reach 
:.16' hands, they are overgrown saddle horses and very 
few of them ever carry the fine features and form, 
style and action with that height. On the other hand, 
they generally become big, coarse, rough, big-boned 
fellows, gross and beefy, which knocks out their action 
and unfits them for the show .ring. Other horses, 16 
hands "or over .are narrow, contracted, their front 
legs nearly together at the breast, no room for lungs, 
weak constitution; body a little larger around than a 
half bushel measure, and not a model or. a uniform 
saddle horse by any menas. 

Some may think that all of my horses are medium- 
boned horses, but I have both the medium and the 
large boned, both of which won more premiums last 
season than any other horses of their respective ages 
in the State of Missouri. Still I say there are very 
few big horses that will me;isure up to the proper 
standards of excellence. An over-grown horse is like 
an overgrown man— he generally grows all out of 
shape and loses his beauty of form and action. The 
medium sized horse is generally healthier, tougher 
and is not subject to the many ailments that the 
overgrown horse is. He is big enough to do any or- 
dinary farm work, can go over more roads in less time 
and with less fatigue, either in the harness or under 
the saddle, than the overgrown horse. He is handier 
for man, woman or child to harness or saddle, to 
mount or dismount, and the average sized than looks 
better on a medium sized horse. Imagine the looks 
of a low, chubby man on a big lfi-hand horse. 

Any breed of horses, from the Shetland pony to the 
draft horse, will lose the desired qualities after they 
reach the extreme height of their respective breds. 
The thoroughbreds, the trotters and the paci is are all 
medium sized breeds, and the most prominent horses 
of each breed scarcely ever go above the average 
height of their respective breed. These three breeds 
constitute the foundation of our American saddle 
horses, which, like their ancestors, are not extra 
largo horses. Thus it is that road mares generally 
make good crosses with the saddle horse, but the 
more good top crosses one can get combined in one 
animal from horses of show ring quality, the better 
prospects are for future success. The medium sized 
horse is plenty large, and If people would drop the 
idea that they must breed to the inferior, big-boned, 
overgrown horse, and put their best efforts forth to 
breed to the horse of show ring quality, with style, 
action and conformation, there would be hundreds of 
saddle horses of show ring Quality where there is not 
one as it is. 



The management of Charter Oak Park. Hartford, 
Conn., proposes opening a futurity for three-year-olds, 
foals of 1906', to be raced In 1909. nominating fee one 
dollar per mare. Conditions and date of closing will 
be announced later. 



A UNIFORM RACING SYSTEM. 

The disagreement of the committee appointed by 
the Grand Circuit stewards, to devise and recom- 
mend a uniform system of racing, is a great disap- 
pointment to trotting horsemen. The Grand Circuit 
programs of last season were so much at variance in 
the matter of some distinct racing plan that the 
question of forcing a uniform system on the track 
managers became absolutely necessary. Consequently 
the prominent trainers, drivers and owners affixed 
their signatures to what was known as the "Syracuse 
c "ompact." 

They are now on record as opposed to any plan 
Which calls for longer racing than best two in three 
and in conformity with that agreement will make no 
entries to long-drawn-out contests. While it was 
signed and made public during the State Fair races 
at Syracuse, yet the signers decided to make an ex- 
ception in the case of the Oakley Park meeting where 
the purses had already been annou I. H was un- 
derstood then that the agreement will be in force the 
coming season and thereafter. 

The action of the Grand Circuit stewards at their 
meeting showed that the track managers had deemed 
it advisable to notice the drivers' agreement and com- 
ply with their demands in some suitable form. 

There is some plausible reason to believe that the 
majority of the tracks will adopt the heat plan of 
racing, which was the system at Buffalo. Detroit and 
partly at Columbus. The immediate announcement of 
(he future plans of the Readville track, the secretary 
of which was a member of the committee, gives this 
idea some good foundation. The system received the 
approval of horsemen with the exception of the un- 
just method of deducting the regulation five per cent 
from winners, which was required by the Buffalo 
plan. 

Secretary Jewett's plan as formulated for Readville 
modifies this, much to the satisfaction of racing men. 
and appears to be upon a fair basis. The cry among 
trotting horsemen will from now on be either the 
Readville system of no five per cent deduction, or if 
any, then on the basis of each division of the purse. 
The "Jewett plan," which the system will hereafter be 
called, calls for a straight five per cent entrance fee 
and nothing more, while at Buffalo last year, some of 
the winners paid back to the association as high as 
thirty-seven and one-half per cent, which was a di- 
rect imposition on horsemen who raced at that track, 
but who are much wiser now. 

The important question now is wheth;: the rest of 
the Grand Circuit members will adopt this plan, giv- 
ing what horsemen have wished, asked and, as a last 
resort, demanded, namely, a uniform system of racing 
throughout the season. Even if the East did adopt 
the heat plan for their meetings, the question will still 
be, how many of them will be generous enough to 
offer the same liberal terms as the Readville man- 
agement has done. 

Each association appears to have its own favorite 
system, as was evidenced from the varied programs of 
last season when every system known to harness rac- 
ing was in vogue with the exception of the dash 
racing. The mixup was general each week. As has 
been stated, Detroit and Buffalo adhered strictly to 
the "heat system" and no race required more than 
three heats to decide the result. 

The Poughkeepsie system, which is still heartily 
endorsed, not only by Secretary Bain of that track, 
but by many other prominent horsemen, called for 
either two-in-three or three-in-five, with the provision 
that horses not standing for any portion of the purse 
at the finish of the second and third heats, respective- 
ly, were ruled out, with the result that of the fifteen 
races on the card only one was a four and another a 
five-heat event. 

Hartford had the straight best three-tn-five with 
the exception of both divisions of the futurity and 
the free-for-all trot and pace, consequently the com- 
petition of the sixteen races required sixty-two heats. 
The stakes and purses at Providence were almost 
equally divided, and the eighteen events were finished 
in fifty-eight heats. The result at Syracuse was about 
the same as that at Poughkeepsie. while at Colum- 
bus there was a general mix-up of heat racing, two- 
in-three. three-in-five and in every race three or more 
heats were trotted or paced. 
• The system at Oakley Park, Cincinnati, was straight 
three-in-five — with one exception, the free-for-all 
trot, and it took sixty-five heats to finish the eighteen 
races. It is not surprising, therefore, that this ques- 
tion is considered of vital importance. 

Whatever disagreement the circuit managers may 
have in the matter, it looks almost certain that there 
will be either none of the "1812" system of elongated 
racing, or, if any, very few in number. When the 
"Syracuse < ompact" was made public, A. J. Welc h, 
owner and manager of (he Hartford and Cincinnati 
tracks, announced his intention of doing away with 
the old-style of three'- in -five and shorten the races, it 
others did the same. It was on this declaration 
mainly that horsemen made concessions in favor of 
Oakley Park track and entered their horses in spite 
of the agreement already signed. 

The only obstacle now apparently In the way of 
shorter racing is the abolishment of the comparative- 
ly few events on other tracks, which call for the five- 
heat plan. Even if these few be allowed, under the 
distinct condition that they be raced on the Pough- 
keepsie plan, they will •?« no harm, provided horse- 
men will agree to make eniries for such events. With 
Detroit, Buffalo, Readville, Hartford and Cincinnati 
In favor of either the three-heat or shorter plan, and 
horsemen firm in their signed agreement, the old sys- 
tem looks practically doomed. — Kentucky Stock Farm. 

Chas. Marvin, who has been very 111 with pneumo- 
n a, is reported as much better, but in such a weak- 
ened condition that it Is doubtful if he will be able 
to train any horses this year. 



[January 27, 19C6 




The Kansas State Breeders' Association will offer 
a $1000 purse for two-year-old trotters and one of 
the same size for three-year-olds to be trotted at the 
Topeka Fair next September. 



It is rumored that Tom Sharkey will have a string 
of horses on the Grand Circuit this year. 



State Veterinarian Charles Keane announces that 
the season for shipping cattle on inspection from 
points below the quarantine line of the State to 
points outside will close January 31, 1906. 



Monroe Salisbury is superintending the training of 
about twenty-five head of horses at Pleasanlon track 
that are owned by James Butler of New York. Mr. 
Salisbury was confined to the house with a severe cold 
two weeks ago, but we are pleased to state that he is 
himself again, and able to be at the track every 
day. 



Bert Webster has entered the employ of Chas. De 
Ryder and has Star Pointer 1:59% and the McKinney 
stallion Greco in charge at Pleasanton. 



There will be two $2000 stakes at the Oregon State 
Fair this year — one for 2.15 pacers, the other for 2:17 
ti otters. This is good news to California owners. 



Coney 2:02 by McKinney is to be , sold at the Splan 
auction sale at Chicago. 



Stewards of the Great Western Circuit will meet 
in Chicago next month to arrange dates and an- 
nounce early closing stakes. 



Strathway 2:19 has two trotters with records bet- 
ter than 2:: 10. Every mare bred to him last year 
is said to be in foal. 



James Marchall of Dixon visited Pleasanton last 
week and made arrangements to breed his mare Trix 
by Nutwood Wilkes to Star Pointer 1:59%. Trix is 
the dam of Mona Wilkes 2:11%, winner of the three- 
year-old pacing division of the Breeders' Futurity of 
1905. Mr. Marshall has as fine a collection of young 
brood mares as there is in California. They are no* 
numerous, but they are bred in producing lines. 



The Yreka News of January 18th says: Frank 
Adams, a horse breeder of Siskiyou and Klamath 
counties, who lives just over the line, was in Yreka 
Tuesday on business, having shipped 150 head of 
horses and 30 head of mules from Montague to San 
Francisco. He was accompanied by E. Stewart, the 
San Francisco dealer, who paid him good prices for 
the animals — $104 a head for 100 of the horses, $125 
a head for 50, and $75 a head for the mules. Mr. 
Adams reports that the horse market is better for 
the breeder than it has been for years. He deals 
only in draft horses and has 500 head on his farm 
which he is breaking for the market. 



While the boom is on with the Sidney Dillons it is 
just as well to remember that Cupid 2:18, trotting, 
still owned in this State, is a full brother to the sire 
of Lou Dillon. He is owned by Mr. A. B. Spreckels 
and has been kept as a private stallion, yet he has 
sired four trotters with records below 2:17. There 
will be several of his get offered at the sale of horses 
from Aptos Farm, to be held in this city soon. 



J. G. Thomas, of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, has sent a 
string of eleven trotters and pacers to Denver to be 
trained by Al Russell. The fastest one in the string is 
Castlewood 2:09%. a pacer by Birchwood. 



H. S. Hogoboom of Woodland, Cal., has heard of 
the pacing stallion Frank Marriott 2:12%, owned by 
a Pennsylvania doctor, who claims him to be the 
largest pacing horse in the world, Frank Mariott being 
17 hands high and weighing 1200 pounds. Mr. Hogo- 
boom thinks his stallion Arthur W. beats the horse 
from the Keystone State a little, as his record is a 
full second faster and he weighs 1400 pounds. 



Information comes from Cleveland, O., that the 
well-known trainer, Vance Nuckols, has sold to 
Thomas W. Murphy of Glen Cove, L. I., the thirteen- 
year-old trotting mare Miss Brock 2:13% by Stranger, 
dam Brooch (dam of Broomal 2:15) by Jay Gould 
2.12%, at a reported price of $2500. The deal was 
closed on the 3d inst., and it is stated that Mr. Mur- 
phy's purpose in buying Miss Brock was to breed her 
to Laconda 2:02. In the four years that Vance Nuck- 
ols and "Doc" Tanner have owned the mare she has 
started in forty-eight races, finishing first twenty- 
seven times, taking second money once, and was only 
unplaced twice, a very creditable record. Miss Brock 
is bred just like Boodle 2:12%, although not a full 
sister, as she is by Stranger, dam by Jay Gould and 
grandam by Ethan Allen 43. 



A western writer, in commenting on the frequently 
made statement that carriage and other classes of 
light harness horses are too high in the country to 
admit of their being bought for eastern trade at a 
profit says: "The trouble largely rests with buyers 
of horses suitable for drivers, carriage animals, heavy 
harness horses and high actors. Prices offered in the 
country are generally lower than the same grade of 
horses are selling right at home to neighbors and local 
dealers. Horses are much higher throughout the 
agricultural portions of the west than at central 
markets, and local consumption has made a market 
right at home for a majority of the horses bred in 
the Missouri valley. At a number of places the past 
year the writer has found driving horses selling at 
$200 per head, when, from experience, it was known 
that the same horses would not bring over $150 per 
head if sold to a shipper. We have in mind several 
sales made within the past four months where horses 
brought from $500 to $1500, and we are in a po- 



One of the most admired horses at Pleasanton is 
Barney Simpson's brown stallion Arner 2:17%, own 
brother to Diablo. Arner weighs very close to 1200 
pounds and is one of the best bodied stallions in 
California, while his legs and feet are about perfec- 
tion. He is siring speed, too, as all his colts that are 
old enough to break are moving out like race horses. 
Mr. Simpson has been importuned to stand Arner at 
several points in California, but will take him back 
to Chico on the first of February. Arner served over 
forty mares there last year and all but three are in 
foal. 



The North Pacific Circuit and the Montana Circuit 
deserve big entry lists. We hope Californians will 
visit them in large numbers. 



Walter Cummings of Denver purchased the trotter 
Bonner 2:11% by Jayhawker at a recent Chicago sale. 



We are pleased to state that while the plans and 
other particulars are not ready for publication, ar- 
rangements are under way for the erection in this 
city of a large pavilion or Tattersall, where horse 
shows and sales can be conducted as they should be. 
Fred H. Chase & Co. will be the managers, and the 
new pavilion will contain a tan bark ring of such 
dimensions that horses can be shown in harness as 
they are at the leading sales in the Eastern cities, 
and spectators will be provided with all the comforts 
of a theater. The first sale to be held in this pro- 



Those who know of the horses bred by Mr. C. X. 
Larrabee at his celebrated Brook Nook Stock Ranch, 
in Montana, are aware of the fact that his mares 
and stallions carry the Morgan blood in their veins, 
combined with the best Hambletonian strains, and 
that he raises very handsome and stylish horses that 
are endowed with speed. In this issue of the Breeder 
and Sportsman Mr. Larrabee advertises three fine 
animals for sale that are now located at Pasadena. 
Particulars as to their breeding, etc., are given in the 
advertisement, which will be found on another page. 




STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY'S TRACK AT SACRAMENTO 

Secretary Al Ltndley reports tLat the day after tbe recent heaty rains 1 bis track was in fine condition to 
work horses on. Owing to its perfect drainage it bldi fair to be a very popular track for winter training. 



Both Dan Patch and Cresceus are to have an op- 
portunity next fall of making new world's records at 
Lexington, Ky. M. W. Savage, owner of this sensa- 
tional pair, has written a letter to Secretary H. W. 
Wilson, of the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' As- 
sociation, saying that he expected to give both Cres- 
ceus and Dan Patch the best of training this season 
and try to lower their present records. He said he 
believed the feat could be accomplished over the Lex- 
ington track, and Secretary Wilson has promised to 
have the track put in the best of condition, with this 
end in view. There are many horsemen here who. 
believe that Cresceus will be able to reduce his pres- 
ent mark considerably. 



Charles A. Durfee came into the office of this jour- 
nal last Tuesday, and hunting up the editor implored 
him to make an item to tfce effect that all the Mc- 
Kinney mares he advertised have been sold, and he 
has nothing left but the two young stallions, Galindo 
and Almaden 2:22%, the former by McKinney and 
the latter by Direct 2:05%. Although he has sold 
the mares, nearly every mail brings him in letters 
from persons who want to buy, and as Mr. Durfee 
does not take to letter writing with as much pleasure 
as he does driving a trotter, he wants the public 
to know that his supply of McKinney mares is ex- 
hausted. In this connection he stated, however, that 
his neighbor, Mr. R. P. M. Greeley of Oakland, has a 
threeyear-old filly by McKinney out of Winnie Wilkes 
2:17%, that is such a sweet going one he is almost 
tempted to break his resolution and get back Into 
the horse business every time he sees her. Mr. Gree- 
ley's filly is for Bale, too, and Durfee says he don't 
know what people are thinking of who want a good 
prospect for the track or the breeding ranks, in al- 
lowing Mr. Greeley, to retain possession of her. Mr. 
Durfee is confident that McKinney will be the great- 
est brood mare sire in the world, as everything out 
of his daughters that has been trained shows racing 
speed. Very few of the McKinney mares have produce 
old enough to race, yet they have produced Irish 
2:08%, Tidal Wave 2:09, Silver Coin 2:10, Sally 
Pointer 2:11 and Eagletta 2:11%, besides several oth- 
ers. 



sition to know that several buyers from eastern mar- 
kets had looked at the same horses and that their of- 
fers were far below the. prices obtained. » * * 
Dealers tell you that they cannot afford to pay more 
for horses suitable for drivers, carriage, coupe, tan- 
dem, four-in-hand or show purposes than $200 to $250 
per head. They affirm that it requires great expense 
in preparing these horses for market. The fact is, 
that it does not cost one-tenth as much to prepare 
a horse for market, as it does to educate one for 
the track. If eastern dealers are to continue buying 
western bred horses, they must jar loose from their 
old ideas and leave more of their money in the 
country." In view of this statement from a man 
who Is in position to know absolutely what he is 
talking about, it would be interesting to hear what 
some of the buyers for the eastern markets have to 
say about his observations. 



posed new pavilion will be the horses from Mr. A. 
B. Spreckels' Aptos Farm, one of the choicest col- 
lections of trotting bred horses ever offered in San 
Francisco. The date of the sale cannot be definitely 
fixed as yet, but will be very close to the first of 
March. 



Mr. J. B. Iverson of Salinas, spent a couple of days 
in the city this week. He reports fine prospects for 
the Salinas Valley, the recent rains putting a fine as- 
pect on the entire country. His good gelding North 
Star 2:13%, winner of all the principal trotting stakes 
for three-year-olds in California last year, is being 
jogged by Trainer Charles Whitehead, and is in fine 
shape. Mr. Iverson does not intend to race North Star 
this year, but will have him out in 1907 if he still 
owns him. Princess 2:13% is better and faster than 
ever, and Mr. Whitehead thinks she will beat 2:10 this 
year. Mr. Iverson's trotter Prince Gift 2:12 has been 
running out for some time and will probably be taken 
up and raced again, as his owner believes he can 
lower his record when he is in condition. Whitehead 
has eight of Mr. Iverson's horses in training, besides 
quite a number of his own. Salinas will give a good 
fair and race meeting this fall. 



Frank S. Turner of the Santa Rosa Stock Farm, 
who recently sold twenty-one head of young Sidney 
Dillons to Sterling R. Holt of Indianapolis, says he 
predicts that three of them will soon be in the 2:10 
list under Millard Sanders' instruction. The three 
he marks for this early distinction are Carlocita, that 
he thinks will pace in 2:04; Carrie Dillon that will 
shade 2:09, and Kate Dillon, that should take a mark 
of 2:07 or 2:08. He expects Sanders to mark all these 
fillies this year. Mr. Holt evidently thinks mighty 
well of Carlocita, as he has stated that he intends 
changing her name to Mary Dillon, the Mary in 
honor of his wife. 



The Breeders' meeting will probably be held in San 
Jose this year. 



Santa Rosa horsemen will organize and give a meet- 
ing this year. Dates and purses will be announced 
soon, It is said. 



EXPRESSIVE MAC AT SACRAMENTO. 

Mr. Philip C. Byrne of Grass Valley will stand the 
McKinney-Wilkes-Electioneer stallion, Expressive 
Mac 41523, at Sacramento this year. He expects to be 
located there by February 1st. Expressive Mac is 
sired by McKinney 2:11%, dam Expressive 2:12% (at 
three years old) by Electioneer 125. He is a fine in- 
dividual, stands over 16 hands high and weighs about 
1200 pounds. In color he is a dark bay. With very- 
little training he has shown that he inherits the speed 
that he is entitled to by his breeding. He is a horse 
of good disposition, and his presence in Sacramento 
will be a chance for owners of good brood mares to 
patronize one of the best young McKinneys in the 
state. Mr. Byrne has made a good selection in secur- 
ing this young stallion. It is his intention to enter him 
in this season's races and as he is perfectly sound and 
shows great speed he expects to give him a low mark. 
The well bred sons of McKinney will be in big demand 
this year and those who wish to breed mares to Ex- 
pressive Mac will do well to make arrangements with 
Mr. Byrne without delay. Address Philip C. Byrne, 
care Willard Gardiner, 418 J St., Sacramento, Cal. • 



January 27, 19(0, 



THE DEMAND FOR HARNESS HORSES. 



A TOUT STORY. 



Henry T. White of the Chicago Inter-Ocean, who is 
one of the closest observers of conditions in the 
horse breeding industry, says: 

"I cannot see where the supply is to come from to 
meet the demand of the next five or six years at least. 
No one will deny the fact that prices and demand are 
better than at any time in the past ten years, and it 
would appear as though, if the horses are in the 
country, owners would be anxious to take advantage 
of the situation and realize the high dollar on their 
holdings. 

"In conversation with the head of the leading auc- 
tion sale business in Kentucky the past week he in- 
formed me that, in spite of their best efforts, the 
number of horses consigned to their coming sale was 
far less than he had a right to expect, considering the 
favorable conditions of the market and that the low 
average of three horses to a consignor told the story. 
He also called attention to the significant fact that 
there were but three or four of the big stock farms 
left in the blue grass region, farms where they bred 
twenty-five mares or more per year, and that the 
smaller breeders had curtailed their operations in 
proportion. 

"Looking over a copy of a leading turf journal pub- 
lished the past week I find a total of thirteen pages 
of advertising, seven and three-quarters of which was 
used by individuals or firms who make a specialty of 
selling horses, and six pages of this in the interest of 
combination auction sales, events of this character 
being held at regular intervals. The list embraces at 
least one sale a week from the last of January to the 
first of May, and in some cases several sales conflict. The stallion service law of this State was amended 
These firms are scouring the country for stock, and- at the last session of the Legislature and is now as 
having a hard time to make a showing. Of course, follows: 



"Marque" of the Horse Review tells the following 
good one: 

I was in the betting ring at Columbus, last fall, 
when I saw a stylishly dressed young man tackle an 
elderly gentleman who was evidently a local horse 
admirer. Feeling certain that it was a case of tout- 
ing, I drew near, so as to catch as much of the con- 
versation as possible. Sure enough, it was the stereo- 
typed song and dance about having seen the wisest 
man on the ground stringing several thousand along 
in the various books on Wentworth for the last heat. 
The black gelding had just won his memorable sec- 
ond heat in 2:04%, Dr. Strong being a close second. 
There was a strong feeling among the talent that Dr. 
Strong would take the final and his price was 2 to 1, 
while Wentworth was quoted at 4 to 1. The tout soon 
had his man interested, and I finally saw the gentle- 
man unbelt his roll. He skinned off a couple of 
twenties and a ten, while the tout's eyes glistened 
with anticipation. However, the gentleman upon be- 
ing importuned to let the tout bet the money for him, 
refused and, advancing to the bookmaker, bet it him- 
self on Wentworth. A look of disappointment flashed 
over the tout's face, but he came back with a plea 
that he was broke and thought it only right, since he 
had given his "extra special," that he be presented 
with a five to put on for himself. The gentleman loos- 
ened and an instant later I saw the tout bet the money 
on Dr. Strong. Well, Wentworth won the heat handily 
and while I didn't see him afterwards, I'll bet that if 
ever there was a tout who felt whip-sawed and 
double-crossed it was this one who had marked the 
cards on himself. 



STALLION LAW IN CALIFORNIA. 



there are a few well established firms having their 
regular following that will continue to send their of- 
ferings, although the number of horses may be less 
than in the past. The balance, in their efforts ta se- 
cure business, will offer inducements in the way of 
cutting commissions, taking conditional entries, and 
permitting by-bidding that will lose them the sup- 
port of the buyers, and as their consignors gradually 
realize they are suffering in consequence, and these 
firms must drop by the wayside. Certain it is there 
never was a more favorable opportunity for a man 
to realize on good horses if he has any to sell than 
by consigning to a first class combination sale, and 
the man who has money to invest, who desires to en- 
gage in business for the future, would have a hard 
job to figure out a safer, surer way of realizing on 
his time, labor, and money than by purchasing foun- 
dation stock of the right kind and engaging in the 
breeding of the light harness horse." 



FROM A GREAT BROOD MARE LINE. 

James A. Smith of Vallejo, announces that his 
grandly bred and handsome McKinney stallion Con- 
structor 39,569 will make the season of 1906 at the 
above named town. Constructor is an own brother 
to that fast stallion Tom Smith 2:13%, and like him 
is a good gaited trotter. He stands 15.2% hands 
over the withers and 15:3% over the loins. He 
weighs 1100 pounds and is the model of a modern, 
high class trotting sire. There are many McKinneys 
in the stud in California, but outside of his full 
brothers there are none bred like Constructor. His 
dam, Daisy S., dam of four in the list, is by Mc- 
Donald Chief 3583, a horse that did much to improve 
the size, style and endurance of the trotting bred 
stock of Solano and adjoining counties. McDonald 
Chief was a son of Clark Chief 89, out of a mare 
by thoroughbred Berthune. The dam of Daisy S. 
was also a great brood mare — Fanny Rose by Ethan 
Allen Jr. She produced Columbus S. 2.17, and George 
Washington 2:16%, both large handsome trotters and 
the latter the sire of Stella 2:15% and several others 
in the list. Fanny Rose also- produced Fanny, dam 
of Scotty 2:19% and Trilby 2:21%, showing that on 
his dam's side Constructor inherits blood that pro- 
duces speed uniformly. With the McKinney cross 
Constructor can be said to be "as well bred as any- 
body's horse," and a prospective sire of speed from 
all classes of mares. At the low service fee of $25 
he should receive an extensive patronage, as such a 
fee is paid readily for services of the most ordinary 
stallions. A perusal of Constructor'* advertisement 
on another page is worth your time. 

1 — o 

HOW THE NEWS WAS RECEIVED AT HOME. 



Every owner or person having in charge any stal- 
lion, jack or bull used for propagating purposes has a 
lien for the agreed price of its service upon any mare 
or cow and upon the offspring of such service, unless 
some wilfully false representation concerning the 
breeding or pedigree of such stallion, jack or bull has 
been made or published by the owner or person in 
charge thereof, or by some other person, at the re- 
quest or instigation of such owner or person in charge. 

Every claimant of a lien provided for in the pre- 
ceding section must within 90 days after the service 
on account of which the lien is claimed, file in the 
office of the county recorder of the county where the 
mare or cow subject thereto is left, a verified claim 
containing a particular description of the mare or 
cow, the date and place of service, the name of the 
owner or reputed owner of such mare or cow, a de- 
scription by name, or otherwise, of the stallion, jack 
or bull performing the service, the Tiame of the owner 
or person in charge thereof, and the amount of lien 
claimed. Such claim, so filed, is notice to subsequent 
purchasers and incumbrancers of such mare or cow 
and of the offspring of such service for one year after 
such filing. 

Action to enforce this lien may be brought in any 
county wherein any property subject to the lien may 
be found. 

, o 

R. AMBUSH 2.1414 AT STUD AT REDLANDS. 



That slashing young trotter Aumbush 2:14%, whose 
name for registration purchases has been changed to 
R. Ambush, will make the season of 1906 at the ranch 
of his owner, Mr. G. W. Bonnell of Redlands, at the 
low fee of $30. R. Ambush made a two-year-old record 
of 2:20 in 1904 and last year reduced it to 2:14% 
In a winning race at San Jose. He is a royally bred 
colt, his sire being Zolock 2:05%, his dam May Kinney 
by Silkwood 2:07, and his grandam Satinette by Mc- 
Kinney 2:11%. As an individual Ambush is about all 
that one could wish, and he has a fine disposition 
and has proven himself a good race horse. He is now 
four years old and will sire early and extreme speed 
to a certainty. 

JUDGES FOR PASADENA HORSE SHOW. 



BEST RECORDS. 

The racing season of 1905 now being at an end the 
presentation of a table of the best records of the 
year is in order, and it is herewith appended. 

Trotters. 

Two-year-olds — 
Colt— Ed Custer by Baronmore 2:14% dam 

Marble 2:14 by Clay King 2:16% 

Filly— Lightsome by Constantine 2:12% dam 

Bourbonlight 2:18% by Bourbon Wilkes... 2- 14% 
Gelding— Bud Bonner by Prodigal 2:16 dam 

by Bourbon Wilkes 9 -19V 

Three-year-olds — 

Colt— Bon Voyage by Expedition 2:15%, dam 

Bon Mot by Erin 2"12y 

Filly— Susie N. by Moko, dam Gipsey Dark * 

by Wiltwood 2 09V 

Gelding— North Star by Nutwood " Wiikes * 

2:16%, dam by Eugeneer 2 '13% 

Four-year-olds — 
Colt— Fatty Felix by Constantine 2:12%, dam 

by Ponce de Leon 2:13 214 

Mare— Gramattan by Grattan 2: 13, dam Zyl- 

pha 2:13%, by Greystone 2-llVi 

Aged — ' 

Stallion— Admiral Dewey by Bingen 2.06%, 

dam Nancy Hanks 2:04 by Happy Medium .'. 2 04 % 
Mare— Sweet Marie by McKinney 2:11%, dam 

Lady Rivers by Carr's Mambrino .'. 2-04% 

Green- 
Stallion— Boreazelle by Boreal 2:15%, dam 

Luzelle 2:15% by Patron 2-09% 

Mare— Deloree by Delmarch 2:11%, dam Hin- 

dee by Allerton 2-09% 

Gelding— Albert C. by Bellini 2:13%, "dani 

Libby Sweet by Highland Gray 2:09% 

Pacers. 

Two-year-olds — 

Colt— Manager H. by Manager 2:06% 2:20 

Colt— Rocka way by Stoneway 2:23%, dam 

unknown 2 - 15% 

McFayden by Diablo 2:09%, dam Bee by < 
Gelding— Kelly by Baronmore 2:14%, dam 

Miss Van Tassell 2:29% by Don Wilkes. .. .2- 19% 
Three-year-olds— 

Filly— Bonalet by Bonnie Direct 2:05%, dam 

Roblet 2:12 by Robin 2-09% 

Matilda 2:30 by Nutwood . . ...2-\%V. 

Four-year-olds — ' 
Stallion— Echo Jr. by Echo, dam Sis Havoc 

by Havoc 2-07 1 / 

Mare— Doris B. by Grattan 2:13, dam Edith * 

Zell by Strathroy 2:07'/ 

Colt— John Kirby by Allerton 2:09%, dam 

Sterling 2:15% 

Gelding— Directwood by Direct 2:06%, dam 

Dolly Fort 2:28% by Lee Wood 2 -08 V 

Aged— ^ 
Stallion— Dan Patch by Joe Patchen 2:01%, 

dam Zelica by Wilkesberry 1:55% 

Mare— The Broncho by Stormcliffe, dam Lux- 

ora by Autocrat Jr 2 -03% 

Gelding — Nathan Straus by Director 2:17* 

dam Mary Marshall 2:12% by Billy Wilkes '.2 : 03% 
Green — 

Stallion— Walter Direct by Direct Hal 2:04%, 

dam Ella Brown 2:11% by Prince Pulaski Jr.2 ■ 05% 

Mare— Lillian by Adrian Wilkes, dam Ab- 

dallah Lightfoot by Mambrino Abdallah . . . 2 : 08 % 

Gelding— Bolivar by Wayland W. 2:12%, dam 

by Harry Wilkes 2- 06 V 



THE GRAND CIRCUIT FOR 1906. 



[Western Horseman, Jan. 12.] 
For some time The Western Horseman has been 
"next" to a proposed business venture of Hon. Ster- 
ling R. Holt, owner of Sidney Dillon. A couple of 
weeks ago Mr. Holt left for California, and the fol- 
lowing telegram received from him at Santa Rosa, 
Cal., January 6, tells a lot in a few words: "Have 
bought twenty-five Sidney Dillons, the best ones in 
California, and they will be trained at the Indian- 
apolis track by Millard Sanders." Whe-ew! Twenty- 
live Sidney Dillons, the best in the land, to be 
"trained out" by Millard Sanders! And Millard San- 
ders trained and marked Lou Dillon 1:58%, the fast- 
est trotter in the 'world, and Lou Dillon is by Sidney 
Dillon! But Mr. Holt "does things" — and the Sidney 
Dillons "do things" — and there will be "great doings" 
at the Indianapolis track the coming season, for there 
will be other great things there besides the Sidney 
Dillons. 



Officials for the Pasadena horse show, to be held 
March 18th, 19th and 20th, have been appointed and 
from now on preparations for the show will be rushed 
to completion. 

The Judges are among the best-known horsemen in 
the country. W. D. Woolwine, Los Angeles; Robert 
Lee Bettner, Riverside, and Walter S. Newhall, Los 
Angeles, will judge the saddle classes. 

Milo M. Potter of Santa Barbara, Walter S. New- 
hall and Captain J. C. Newton of South Pasadena 
will judge the roadster classes. 

Francis C. Underhill of New York has consented to 
take charge of the heavy harness classes. 

o 

Another wanderer that has come back to the fold 
is Crit Davis, who after a long time with the bang- 
tails will train for the Cecils of Danville, Ky. 
o 

BE ABLE TO CURE THESE DISEASES. 

The stock owner who has gone through an epidemic 
of distemper, epizootic, pinkeye, etc., is in position to 
know the value of a remedy that will positively cure 
these ailments. Still better is it to be able to prevent 
them. There is no question that Dr. Craft's Distem- 
per & Cough Cure, advertised in another column, is 
effective both as a preventive and a cure. It has been 
on the market many years. It Is invariably sold un- 
der a guarantee to refund the money if It fails. It has 
been used by two hundred thousand horsemen and 
stockmen. It is equally effective on horses, sheep and 
dogs. It is worth while to be familiar with the merits 
of such a remedy and we advise our readers to at 



On a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soda lemonade" 
and be refreshed. 



Detroit, Mich, July 23-Aug. 4. 
Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 6-11. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y.. Aug. 13-18. 
Readville, Mass., Aug. 20-25. 
Providence, R. I., Aug. 27-Sept. 1. 
Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 10-15. 
Columbus, O., Sept. 17-22. 
Cincinnati, O., Sept. 24-29. 

o 

An eastern exchange says: "The New England 
1 rotting Horse Breeders' Association has decided that 
the entire program for the Grand Circuit meeting at 
Readville will be made up of dash races. This is a 
surprise to the horsemen, as the association has been 
inclined to be conservative in the matter of adopting 
new ideas. It is the idea of the directors that every- 
thing possible should be done to attract the sport- 
loving public to their races. It has been claimed that 
the public demands shorter races and also racing upon 
a plan that will do away with postponed races. To 
illustrate the new Readville plan, the following sam- 
ple race is given: The Massachusetts, for 2:10 trot- 
ters. An event of three races of one mile, $3000 each 
race, divided as follows: First horse, $2000; second 
horse, $600; third horse. $300; fourth horse, $100. 
Nothing to be deducted from money winners; horses 
to be named at the time of closing of entries. Forfeits 
of $40, $65, $90, $120, $135 would be due in sequence 
on April 10th, May 10th. June 9th, July 10th. and 
August 8th. Additional horses In the same stable 
may be named and a forfeit of $9 will be due on 
each of the above-named dates. Nominators will not 
be held for forfeit after they have been declared out 
in writing. In this event horses will draw for posi- 
tions in the first heat, bu.t will start In the second 
heat as they finished In the first, and in the third as 
they finished in the second. By this plan the problem 
of long drawn out races will be solved. Any horse 
that secures a record will be recompensed by winning 
the first division of the purse, and every horse in the 
race will be called upon to race to his limit every heat. 



once send to the manufacturers, The Wells Medicine 

Co., 13 Third St., Lafayette, Ind., for a copy of their When the plan is tried some objections to It may be 
valuable pamphlet, "Veterinary Pointers." It is free, developed, but it is certainly worthy of a fair trial." 



[January 27, 1906 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



COMING EVENTS. 
Rod. 

Jan. 1-June I -Closed season for black bass. 

April l- Sept. 1j. Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season tor taking slca'.- 
baad in tidewater. 

Sept. 10-Oct. )6 -Close jeason In tidewater for steelhead. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season for catcblng salmon. 

Sept. 15-Aprll 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Oct. 18-Nov. lb - Close season for taking salmon above tide, 
water. 

Nov. 1- April I— Trout season closed. 

Nov. l -April I— Closed season for taking steelhead above the 

water. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open jeason for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
* ater. 

Gun. 

July 1-Feb. la— Dove season open. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 

age hen. 

Oct. 15-Feb. 15— Open season for quail, ducks, etc. 

Oct. 15-Aprtl 1— Open season for English snipe. 

Oct. 15-Aug 1— Deer season closed. 

Bench Shows. 

Jan. 18, 19— Lynn Kennel Club. Lynn, Mass. Tom B. Middle- 
brooke, Superintendent Entries closed Jan. 6. 

Jan. 24, 27-Southern Kennel Club. Memphis, Tenn. Harry W. 
Clapbam, Secretary. Entries closed Jan. 10. 

Feb. 12. 15— Westminster Kennel Club New York. Robt. V. 
McKIm, Secretary. Entriesclose Jan. 25. 

Feb. 20, 23— New England Kennel Club. Boston. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. Entries close Jan. 30. 

Feb. 28-Mareh 3— Washington Kennel Club. Washington, Pa. 
F. C. Thomas, Secretary. Entries close Feb. 22. 

March 1, 3-Southern Ohio Kennel Club. Hamilton, Ohio. 
Thos. Boll, Secretary. 

March 7, 10— Duquesne Kennel Club. Pittsburg, Pa. F. S. 
Steadman. Secretary. Entries close Feb. 25. 

March 8, 10-Colorado Kennel Club. Denver, Col. T. W. Bar- 
tels, Secretary. 

March 13, 16-Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N. Y. S. P White, 
Secretary. 

March 14. 17— Passaic County FNh and Game Protective Asso- 
ciation. Paterson, N. J. Jas Matthews, Secretary. 

March 21, 24- Wolverine Kennel Club. Detroit, Mich. K. G. 
Smith, Secretary. 

May San Francisco Kennel Club, luth annual bench show, 

Fred P Butler, Secretary. 

May 29, 30— Long Island Kennel Club. Jos. M. Dale, Secretary, 
Brighton Beach, L I. 

June 1 2— Ladies Kennel Association of Mass. Mrs. L. M. 
Speed, Secretary. 

June9— Wlssahlckon Kennel Club. Wlssahickon, Pa. J. Ser- 
geant Price, Secretary 

Sept. 3. 6 -Taunton Kennel Club. Taunton, Mass. A.J.Leo, 
Secretary. 

Sept. 8— Cedarhurst Kencel Club. Cedarhurst, L I. Jno G. 
Bates, fjecretary. 

Field Trials. 

Jan. 15-Unlted States Field Trial Club. 17th annual trials. 
Grand Junction, Tenn. W. B Stafford, Secretary. 

Jan National Championship Field Trial Club 10:h annual 

trials FollowlmU. S All Age Stake. W. B. Stafford, Secre- 
tary, Trenton, Tenn. 

THE DENNY PHEASANT. 



Twenty years ago the late Judge Denny imported 
from China eighteen China ring-neck or Torquatus 
pheasants and gave them their liberty in the Willam- 
ette valley some fifteen mile from Corvalis. Shortly 
after state laws were enacted protecting these birds 
and they are today the game bird of Oregon. The 
grouse and native pheasant, once so plentiful in that 
section, are a thing of the past, at least so far as the 
Willamette valley is concerned. The latter no doubt 
have been driven back to "tall timber" in the foothills 
by the pugnacious China cock birds, who are always 
on the war path against anything that wears feathers. 

A few years ago the State Legislature in recogni- 
tion of Judge Denny's generous act gave these birds 
the name of "Denny pheasants," but they are most 
commonly known as the China pheasant. They are, 
beyond a doubt, the most prolific game bird in ex- 
istence today. Thousands have been killed by "pot 
hunters" and others every year, both in and out of 
season; eggs and young destroyed by ground vermin, 
and in many seasons the late rains totally destroy the 
early broods. The pheasant hen frequently selects the 
open field or meadow for a nesting place, and will 
often stick to the nest until run over and invariably 
crippled by the mower. 

When plowing summer fallow, nests are frequently 
run into, and the farmer, not wishing to plow the eggs 
under, sets nest and all out onto the plowed ground, 
only to be devoured by the hungry crow. The crow 
is one of their worst enemies, and, strangely enough, 
they seldom molest the pheasants' nests until the eggs 
are almost ready to hatch, at which time they will 
attack a nest in great numbers. The pheasant will 
make a brave effort to protect her property, but 
while one or two crows manage to engage her in a 
combat a few feet from the nest, the others dive down 
and destroy the eggs. However, in the face of all this, 
each hen will bring off three or four broods of from 
thirteen to seventeen young in a season, and they have 
spread over the state and Increased in numbers al- 
most beyond belief. It is no uncommon thing to see 
lliom mingle with the domestic fowls around the barn- 
yard. This is true, however, more with the male birds, 
who have been "known to mate with Leghorn or Ban- 
tam hens, producing a hybrid that neither crows, 
cackles, lays eggs or takes any apparent interest in 
life whatever. When a China male and the common 
dung-hill "cock of the walk" meet in mortal com- 
bat, as they frequently do on the country farms, the 
latter invariably gets worsted. 

The great cartoonist, Homer Davenport, whose old 



home is at Silverton, Ore., is a devoted pheasant fan- 
cier and has a collection exceeding that of the largest 
zoological garden in the world. He is the authority 
for the statement that Oregon now contains more 
China pheasants than their native country, China, re- 
gardless of the fact that 50,000 were killed in one day 
last season in that state. 

The destructive forest fires that caused the dense 
smoke to hang over the Willamette Valley for so long 
a time last summer served the illegal hunters a double 
purpose. It enabled them to come nearer their game, 
and at the same time shield them from the farmers, 
who are, for the most part, trying to protect the 
game. 

As the pheasants feed principally upon insects, the 
farmer does not begrudge the little grain they eat, 
most of which would otherwise be wasted. Some 
claim that they will rid a garden of cut-worms with- 
out doing any material damage. 

It is a safe estimate to say that four-fifths of the 
farmers in the part of the valley where these birds 
were first liberated, have at some time attempted to 
rear and domesticate them. Several instances are au- 
thoritatively noted where good-sized brtjods have been 
hatched out and allowed to run around the barnyard 
with a common hen for a mother, but as soon as they 
were of any age they would disappear to the fields. 

A recent article on pheasant-rearing in an eastern 
journal says they cannot be reared in captivity unless 
fed on maggots. This is a mistake, according to Gene 
Simpson, who states: "I find that young pheasants 
do remarkably well on hard-boiled eggs chopped fine, 
and fresh ground meat, crumbled with corn meal. I keep 
them in tight, covered runs, in a dry place, with plenty 
of sunlight, and have this season lost fewer pheasants 
than young chicks, in proportion to the number hatch- 
ed. Among the poultry fanciers there are those who 
are continually striving to create new breeds, and the 
wonder is that more do not take up pheasants. There 
is certainly no bird living more beautiful than a male 
pheasant In full plumage. They can be raised at about 
the same cost as the smaller varieties of chickens, and 
a financial point in their favor is that there will be no 
culls. With proper care and close attention they are 
even hardier than young chicks and, strange to say, 
stand close confinement better." Mr. Simpson has 
been a breeder of fancy poultry for several years, but 
owing to the great demand for China pheasants for 
breeding purposes, the latter will take up his entire 
attention and be raised exclusively. The possibilities 
of the pheasant industry are unlimited and may be- 
come one of the industries of the Willamette. 

Adult China pheasants need no roosting house, for 
the lightest and most open portion of the yard will be 
selected for a roosting place, their wild nature thus 
placing them on guard against any approach of in- 
truders. One section of yards on Mr. Simpson's place 
is divided into runs, 12 by 28 feet, covered overhead 
and boarded up full (light around the entire outside 
to avoid the possibilty of the birds being disturbed 
during the laying season. Pheasants rarely ever set in 
captivity, and when they do they make very poor 
mothers. In fact, they seldom make a nest at all, 
laying their eggs promiscuously around the runs. Ban- 
tam hens make the best mothers for pheasants. Each 
run is planted with shrubbery as a protection against 
the rays of the hot sun, and at the same time affording 
a hiding place when suddenly approached by stran- 
gers. If extra male birds and separate runs are not 
available, one male may be mated with about three 
hens with good results, but where birds are liberated 
for stocking purposes an equal number of males and 
females should be liberated together. In their wild 
state these birds mate off in pairs and the male has 
been known to take the first brood, at a few weeks old, 
while the female prepares for another, and in this way 
it is claimed that a single pair of pheasants have been 
watched and known to have reared two and three 
broods, all flocking together at the end of the season. 

In the State of Washington hunters are required to 
pay a license and the money thus obtained is turned 
over to the County Commissioners of the various 
counties, who, the law states, are to expend the same 
toward protecting and propagating game birds. The 
County Commissioners of Yakima County have placed 
an order, through Game Warden S. H. Dills, for fifty- 
three Chinese pheasants, which will be liberated in the 
Yakima Valley. China pheasants were imported Into 
that valley last year and are reported greatly increased 
in number this season in some localities. Commis- 
sioners of other counties have signified their inten- 
tions of doing likewise. Of all the pheasant family 
the China is the best species for stocking this country 
for game purposes and private reserves, and is the 
game bird of them all. 

With them, the male wears all the finery, a bril- 
liant plumage, comprising all the colors of the rain- 
bow. While the plumage of the female is very dull, 
It is a graceful bird nevertheless. The general make- 
up of its color is such that when approached by the 
hunter it is enabled to apparently turn into a clod or 
rock, and one might walk within a few feet without 
observing it, but once your back is turned the bird is 
up and gone before you have time to realize what has 
happened. Another dodge is when in the open field 
to make for a dead furrow and run so close to the 
ground as to be completely obscured from sight until 
out of range. Again they will get a tree, bush or 
fence post between themselves and the hunter, get up 
and keep so accurately behind the obstruction that a 
shot will be impossible. 



The English ring-neck pheasant, a hibrid between 
the Torquatus and the old English black-neck pheas- 
ant, and the China pheasant are distinct and different, 
although they resemble each other very much. The 
English ring-neck is a short, chunky bird, while the 
China tapers off more gracefully at either extremity, 
and the latter has the distinct half-moon in gray over 
the eyes. The English ring-neck, is the standard 
sporting pheasant of England. 

Many attempts have been made to introduce this 
grand game bird in California, with the exception of 
a few favored localities each experiment has failed, 
the birds would be liberated and would rarely be seen 
again. Generally speaking, favorable environment for 
protection and propagation of the Denny pheasant, is 
not available for any great showing in introducing the 
birds throughout our State. 

o 

Noted Trap Shot a Hermit. 

Capt. John L. Brewer, who suddenly disappeared 
from public view with the honor of the world's cham- 
pion wing shot, is living a hermit's life at Hammon- 
ton, N. J. Capt. Brewer, when he was In the field, 
made some of the greatest of the world's records, and 
became especially celebrated for his record in shoot- 
ing blue rock pigeons in England. 

Brewer is now living in a small house on the Ham- 
monton and Batsto road, thirty miles from Camden, 
and is ekeing a livelihood by trapping and shooting 
game birds and animals. 

When visited recently by an old-time friend. Capt. 
Brewer was found in a modest, plainly furnished cot- 
tage enjoying a dinner of fresh fish. A dozen hounds 
and field dogs kept guard outside the cottage and 
barked with eagerness for the hunt when their master 
appeared, though the hounds had had a twelve hours' 
chase the day before. 

"The best dogs in the country, but noisy ones," the 
old-time wing shot declared. 

"Trapping pays when you know how to do it, but 
you must be an expert to make the business a suc- 
cess," he said. "Have I been successful? Well, there's 
a statement from New York for my last shipment," 
and he exhibited an account of more than a hundred 
dollars, forty of which was paid for four otter hides 
recently trapped. 

' The biggest otter ever captured in South Jersey 
and the cutest little baby otter were among those," 
he said. "That big otter was 6 feet 9 inches in length 
and as jet black as any you ever saw. I captured him 
just as he was biting off the last toe that held him in 
the trap. Fight? Well I guess he did. I had to shoot 
him in the head to prevent his escape and save the 
pelt. 

"When I got him the chain that held the trap was 
severed, and had he known this he could have easily 
escaped. I caught those four otters in three days, 
and half a dozen others escaped by leaving their toes 
in the traps. The puppy otter was so tame after I 
had scratched his back and throat that he allowed me 
to carry him under my arm, and 'snugged up' against 
my breast, but I had to kill him to get the big fellow- 
out of the trap 

'One of the escaped otters had had a fight with 
a coon that was in a trap beside it. I usually set 
two or three traps close together, so that if the game 
escapes one it is likely to be caught in another. One 
of these otters had each of its hind legs in separate 
traps when I found it. Near an old log that lay across 
«M*reek I found a great pile of brush over a spot where 
I had planted my traps. Upon investigation I found 
a coon in one of the traps. The animal was more 
dead than alive. Its ears were sliced like a shredded 
tobacco leaf, and it was cut badly about the body. 

"In a nearby trap lay half an otter's foot, and ottei 
fur covered the brush pile that had been gathered by 
th. trap chains, thus showing what a desperate strug- 
gle had been the result of the double trapping." 

Capt. Brewer said he had captured ten otters last 
winter and trapped and shot over fifty foxes, besides 
a large number of minks, raccoons, and other fur ani- 
mals. He has lost the surplus flesh that was his when 
he carried the championship belt, but he is very wiry 
and muscular, while his flesh is as hard as leather 
and his eyes are as bright and penerating as in the 
days when he wrested the belt from Dr. Carver and 
("apt. Bogardus in this country and showed shots 
across the sea that they weren't in it with a Jersey- 
man. 

1 — o 

Washington's Birthday Trap Shoot. 

Following the usual custom, the initial trap shoot 
for the local season of 1906 will take place at Ingleside 
on February ,22nd, under the combined auspices of 
the Goiden Gate and Union Gun Clubs. An attractive 
program will be arranged. 

1 — o 

Englewood Kennels' New Stud Dog. 

Glen Tana Bounder (ch. Parabold Piccolo-Braehead 
Beauty II) has been leased to Mr. W. C. Bogen by 
Glen Tana Kennels of Spokane, Wash., and is now lo- 
cated in his new home at Campbells, Santa Clara 
county. 

Bounder has a record of seventy-five prizes won and 
has been a producing sire of winners. He is a full 
litter brother to Ch. Anfield Model, who is said to be 
the greatest living Collie sire of the present day. 
o 

San Jose Show. 

At a recent meeting of the Santa Clara Kennel Club 
the proposition of holding a bench show during April 
or May received much encouragement. A sentiment 
favoring Harry Lacy for judge, should the cluh be 
able to secure the Boston gentleman's services, was 
strong with those present at the meeting. 

The officers of the club are: President, W. H. Car- 
michael: vice-president, Norman J. Stewart; secre- 
tary, Charles Harker: treasurer, M. Perry. 

1 — o 

In hot weather there is no drink like Jackson's 
Napa Soda — plain or in a lemonade. 



January 27, iai6] 



9 



GLORIES OF CALIFORNIA LAKES. 

California is justly famous for the number and ex- 
cellence of its fishing waters — lakes, streams and the 
ocean. 

Along the great Sierra Nevada mountains are scat- 
tered a number of beautiful lakes. One of the best 
known and most popular of these magnificent little 
bodies of crystal ice-cold waters is the famous Web- 
ber lake. This beautiful lake lies in Sierra county, 
California. 

In fact three lakes — Webber, Dormer and Inde- 
pendence — are all located near one another. The 
waters of these lakes are clear, cold and very deep, 
and abound in the same varieties of both native and 
introduced trout. 

During the spring, summer and autumn, Webber 
Lake is visited by great crowds who go thither to 
fish and enjoy a season of rest and recreation. 

All three of the lakes named lie in the very heart 
of the vast Sierra range — overshadowed by the tower- 
ing, brooding mountains, whose rugged sides and sum- 
mits are reflected in their transparent depths. Hid- 
den streams and snow furnish an unfailing source of 
water supply the year round. 

Sage Hen creek flows out from Webber lake, and 
pours into- Prosser creek, and so finally reaches the 
famous Truckee river, whose name is as wide as the 
American continent among the great "fishing fra- 
ternity." 

• • Fly-fishing is very fine all along the devious zig- 
j^aggjngs of Hen creek, and a great many magnificent 
trout are caught in Webber lake. 

Really, there is but small variance between the 
three named lakes as to the result of angling. 

As to Webber lake in particular: There are four 
varieties of trout found in this lake — the-Cutthroat (so 
called from a peculiar red line under the throat), the 
Loch Leven, or Scotch trout; the Von Behr, or Ger- 
man golden trout, and the Eastern red speckled trout. 

The most authentic records show that the finest lot 
of Loch Leven trout (2500 in number), each measuring 
from 6 to 8 inches long, were released in Webber lake 
in 1895. They have increased very rapidly, and speci- 
mens weighing 6% pounds have been frequently 
caught with rod and fly. 

These fish are all game— very fierce fighters — even 
to the death. They will snap at a fly very readily, 
and when fairly hooked will leap out of the water 
so long as there is a spring left in them. As a gen- 
eral rule they are harder and longer fighters than the 
famed rainbow. 

In this lake (Webber) the cut-throats have a pe- 
culiar habit. They seldom leap, but do most, if not 
all, of their fighting in and under water. When the 
temperature rises from 60 to 70 degrees they forsake 
the surface and insects, real and fraudulent, for the 
cooler water along the bottom of the lake and subsist 
on different pabulum. 

These fish will remain down until the water cools, 
say to about 50 degrees, which it does with the first of 
the frosty fall nights; then Mr. Cut-throat again feeds 
t ear, or upon the surface. 

.Royal sport is provided all anglers' in all the lakes 
mentioned during June, July and September. The 
rainbow .trout differs from the cut-throat in this re- 
spect. «The changes of temperature have no effect on 
them Not unlike the pirates of old, they are free 
rovers and free feeders, frequently remaining on the 
surface, then again resorting at various depths, but 
usually near the surface when insect life is plentiful, 
and fly-casting is possible. 

Regarding the matter of lures and tackle: The 
most eagerly taken flys in those waters are March 
brown, oak. blue wing, black and blue, red ant, black 
and bumble bee, professor, royal coachman, and even- 
ing dun. 

Nos. 10 and 12 hooks are the best to use. The 
trolling and casting spoons should be Al. Wilson's 
wobbler, copper and silver and all copper, also the 
Emeric spinner; for leaders, 9-foot light silk worm 
gut; line, enameled silk, size F. and G., reel to carry 
150 feet of line; rod from 9 to 10 feet long and weigh- 
ing from 6 to 8 ounces. 

Webber is only one of many lakes and streams in 
the wild Sierra regions. Within a comparatively 
small radius there are no less than ten lakes, in any 
and all of which very excellent sport may be found. 

Little Fordyce Lake is worthy of special mention. 
This body lies only seven miles away from Weber, 
and is reached by a narrow and winding trail, lead- 
ing well up into the frowning Sierras some 9,000 feet 
above the tide-level. The little lake fairly swarms 
with fish. 

The fishing season, proper, opens April 1 and closes 
November 1, but there is no very good Ashing in 
Webber lake, or the other lakes mentioned, much 
before the first of June. 

So lofty and hyperborean are those regions that 
t^e snow and ice do not disappear before that date. 
Fishing in these lakes is principally done with boats 
Trolling is one of the principal and favorite methods. 
But very little shore fishing is done except in the re- 
mote lakes where there are no boats. 

In these high and magnificent regions, the ardent 
fly-caster is sure of a heart's content of complete rest 
and change for work-weary eyes. These superb lakes 
— especially Webber — are among the grandest for 
scenery and "fishing qualities" to be found on the 
entire Pacific Coast. Anglers from the East and 
Middle West, who contemplate a professional trip to 
the Pacific Coast should not overlook these magni- 
ficent Sierra lake? — Webber in particular. 

• — ' — o 

Grand American Handicap. 

Secretary-Manager Elmer E. Sbaner in a recent 
letter states that the Grand American Handicap tar- 
get tournament will be held the third or fourth week 
in June — the exact dates will be shortly announced. 



NERVOUS DOGS. 



In order to appreciate properly what is meant by 
the expression nervous dogs, it is necessary to bear 
in mind that the predominant feature in canine tem- 
perament is actually nervousness, and that when we 
point to any particular members of the race as being 
nervous, we really mean ultra-nervous ones — those, in 
fact, in which the natural trait is unduly pronounced. 
The result of overlooking this important consideration 
is that nervousness in clogs is far more frequently 
regarded, as far as its results go, as a sign or in- 
stance of bad behavior, whereas it is really an exhibi- 
tion of a very natural weakness. As a rule, with this 
mistaken view of the matter, the means adopted to 
check or remedy the failure are frequently only too 
well calculated to increase and aggravate it. It thus 
follows that ultra-nervousness, but slightly promi- 
nent in a puppy, may, by incorrect handling and 
treatment, be gradually developed into what is gen- 
erally termed gun-shyness in the sporting breeds and 
extreme nervousness in others, writes "Moorman" in 
The Illustrated Kennel News 

Popular error describes gun-shyness as a hereditary 
complaint, but there is certain reason for the mis- 
take. Dogs of highly nervous nature are apt to beget 
puppies of equal or more pronounced nature in this 
respect, which quite easily, by wrong treatment or 
incorrect handling, may be developed into a singularly 
annoying weakness or fault. It is, however, possible, 
and not very rarely the case, that extreme nervous- 
ness in dogs may arise from constitutional weakness. 

This is usually the case when it is suddenly devel- 
oped in mature dogs and is then a matter to be dealt 
with by the skillful canine pathologist, and not one in 
which the average dog owner or trainer is likely to 
attain a cure. For the most part, however, nervous- 
ness is gradually developed in the dog from the time 
of puppyhood onward, and as it is only when it reaches 
a certain stage, and a particular proof of its exist- 
ence impresses itself upon the owner that the blem- 
ish becomes apparent. It is not unusual, moreover, 
for the fact that a dog is ultra-nervous to be made 
evident by a change of ownership. In the case of 
sporting dogs this occurs 1 more frequently than in 
those of other breeds not subject to close control. Its 
occurrence, however, for the reason named, is usually 
unsuspected, or overlooked. It is obvious that, from 
this cause, many of the disputes as to dogs' behavior 
may, and certainly do, arise. 

In most instances, however, nervousness in dogs is 
brought out by shock; shock acting upon nerves al- 
ready weak or highly strung, according to the point 
of view. The result is more or less collapse of the 
nervous system, exactly as in the case under corres- 
ponding circumstances in the human subject. In the 
latter the shock may be produced by a variety ol 
causes; in the dog it is usually by a sound, occasional- 
ly by an accident or unmerited and unexpected chas- 
tisement. 

Where the nervous system is unduly developed it is 
chiefly an unexplained and sudden and unexpected 
sound which causes the shock and starts the com- 
plaint. That this is termed mostly gunshyness is due 
to the fact that a sudden and unexplained sound is 
thrust upon dog, and caused by a gun, the most 
fruitful source of anything of the kind where dogs 
are concerned. 

The symptoms of ultra -nervousness are the same 
in all dogs, sporting, non-sporting, or Toys. The 
chief of them is extreme susceptibility to sound sud- 
denly uttered. It may be the mere crack of a whip, 
the slamming of a door or gate, a sharply expressed 
order or a gunshot itself. The effect is the same. 
The dog suffers a shock, and the resulting effect is the 
exhibition of fright, unnecessary and uncalled for, so 
the owner thinks, and so it actually is. There has, 
however, been a shock to the animal's nerves, ana 
therein lies the mischief. This may occur almost at 
any time in the life of the dog, in early puppyhood 
or at a more mature period. When a shock of this 
nature occurs to a dog of tender years the effect is 
frequently less lasting than in the case of an older 
one, and is consequently more easily, or rather with 
less difficulty, dealt with. There are, too, some breeds 
of dogs which may be said to be practically proof 
against anything of the kind, whilst others, such as 
gunclogs, sporting Terriers, Greyhounds and the 
majority of the Toy dogs, are much more susceptible 
to it. It will probably come as a surprise to many 
of the fair owners and others of Toy dogs, but it is 
necessary to put on record that the great majority 
of these pets are more or less affected with gun-shy- 
ness in the particular form in which it appears in 
their pets. 

We have now made it clear what constitutes and 
what causes nervousness in dogs. When not dealt 
with properly the weakness or blemish will inevitably 
steadily increase until the case of the afflicted dog 
becomes a hopeless one. On the other hand, by care- 
ful and considerate treatment, the nervousness may 
be steadily overcome. It is, however, usually' a mat- 
ter likely to occupy considerable time and involve 
much trouble nd ere. As soon as a dog shows signs 
of nervousness endeavor must be made to discover the 
cause whic h has brought about that state of affairs, 
Sometimes the primary instance which caused it may 
be known. That in itself Is a great point of assist- 
ance in combating the malady. In any case, by close 
observation of the dog. and If need be by experiment, 
the original cause must be sought out and discovered. 
Then the necessary steps must be undertaken to over- 
come the Infliction. In the ease of trained dogs, it 
is often feasible to maintain the trained state at the 
same time that it is sought to overcome the nervous- 
ness", but In the case of those not trained, but in- 
tended to be. any thought of this latter must be put 
aside until the nervousness is wholly or partly over- 
come. 

The first thing to be done is to thoroughly and en- 
tirely gain the confidence of the dog. Whatever ma> 



have been the case in the past, the nervous shock 
which the dog has suffered will have affected the con- 
fidence which it held in its master or owner. It is 
necessary to cause it to understand, as far as pos- 
sible, that the owner of the dog Is not responsible 
for the cause which originated the nervous shock, 
and by continually making much of it re-secure its 
entire confidence. The dog must also be placed under 
conditions which will prevent any repetition of that 
cause in the shape of sudden fright or alarm. The 
dog should be kennelled in company with a single and 
steady companion not likely to quarrel with it, be 
exercised with it, and kept as far as possible from 
mixing with other dogs for the time being. 

The clog when at exercise should be kept under close 
observation, and be offered every encouragement to 
enjoy itself in unrestricted freedom. Of course, any- 
thing likely to alarm or scare the dog must be avoided, 
but should it show signs of fear or nervousness, then 
every endeavor must be made to bring the dog's un- 
derstanding to the fct that there is no valid reason 
for its fearsomeness. In endeavoring to do this the 
entire confidence of the dog must be sought to be 
maintained, and should it evince any signs of ex- 
treme shyness and a tendency to slink off and bolt, 
every means must be employed to coax and encourage 
it. Any attempt to compel the dog to remain or 
return is sure to lead to failure. Peremptory orders, 
threats, or the like, are here entirely out of place and 
ineffective, and unless the dog can be coaxed into 
obedience and restraint it is useless to attempt other 
means. Extreme patience and the expenditure of a 
great deal of time and trouble are required before 
the nervousness of the dog can be overcome. 

Even then, however, it may not be possible to suc- 
ceed, and in that case the dog must be put on the 
lead, but the means in question must not be em- 
ployed in any forcible manner, but only as a means 
to restrain the dog from bolting away and retain it 
within the limits necessary for exercising influence 
over it. Under no circumstances should it be coupled 
to another dog, a supposed remedy frequently rec- 
ommended, but entirely ineffective, and usually pro- 
vocative of increased fear. 

As soon as the extreme nervousness will be partly 
overcome, and the dog's confidence thoroughly and 
effec tually regained, steps must be taken to accustom 
it to what may have been the cause of its^iervous 
breakdown, and to other happenings of a like nature. 
Amongst ordinary dogs, other than gun-dogs, there 
is no more fruitful cause of nervousness than gate- 
slamming and no more frequent cause 'for a con- 
tinuance of the weakness in dogs so afflicted. And I 
know no more easy and effective means of curing 
them of the failing than by accustoming them to the 
working and slamming of a large and loosely-con- 
structed and loosely-hung field gate. It will be easily 
ascertained from the behavior of the dog if it betrays 
fear of the subject in question, and if so, the mode ot 
overcoming its aversion and timidity would be as fol- 
lows: In the first instance, take or coax the dog up 
to the gate, induce it to follow through, and close it 
gently. Repeat the process until the dog understands 
that o far there is nothing to fear. Then take the 
dog to some little distance, fifteen yards or so, and 
get some one to open and then gently slam the gale. 
Keep on repeating the process, bringing the dog a 
little nearer each time, and increasing the force and 
consequent noise with which the gate is closed, until 
you have succeeded in bringing the dog close to the 
gate and letting it understand that there is nothing 
to fear from the noise caused. 

Then commence to : .>ass the dog to and fro, re- 
peating the performance of gently, and then roughly, 
closing the gate beh'nd you, until such time when 
the dog no longer shows signs of fear, and has be- 
come to regard the nuise made as being quite in the 
natural order of things, and devoid of (fancied) dan- 
ger to itself. It is not advisable to give the dog too 
severe a lesson upon the first occasion, and it may be 
extended, and must be repeated upon successive days. 
Then miss a day and try the dog again. If it appears 
all right, then miss two or three days, and again 
repeat the experiment Following upon this try the 
dog with other gates, and if all goes well the battle 
is won. 

From the foregoing will be learned how one must 
go to work to overcome this dreadful nervousness. 
As the slamming of a gate has been got over, so can, 
and must, other irritant causes be dealt with, until 
the dog's nerves have been once more thoroughly re- 
habilitated. It is a vexing and tiresome process, in- 
volving an unlimited amount of patience. There is, 
however, no other mode of accomplishing the end in 
view, and anything in the way of harshness or com- 
pulsion is entirely out of the question. The same 
process applied to gun-shyness or any other form of 
acute nervousness and will overcome and cure it. The 
principle is the same; It Is only the application of it 
which varies. 

The only other point necessary of note is a careful 
observance of the nervous dog's behavior In connec- 
tion with other dogs in the kennel, and, in fact, with 
dogs generally. As a rule, the ultra-nervous dog 
seems to lie aware of its weakness, and tends to dis- 
play 'he fact when in company. This may, however, 
equally well be overcome by working the dog in and 
out In the company of others by putting them to- 
gether and then withdrawing the patient, by making 
much of each and all together, and by coaxing the 
nervous subject into play and Into obedience along 
with its companions. 

It must be remembered, too, that even when you 
have cured a dog of. ultra-nervousness It will forever 
afterwards be more liable to further attacks, and that 
in handling, training, and the every-day ordering of 
the dog, an eye must always be given to such pos- 
sibility, and a more suave and equable form of control 
be meted out to it than to others of its kind and 
kennel. 

Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet. 



10 



[January 27. 19C6 



FITTING THE MAN TO THE GUN. 



SINGLE TRIGGERS IN COLD WEATHER. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



The sporting works of the day. and many of the 
more particular sportsmen who read them, are elo- 
quent on the subject of the "fit of guns and there 
is vouchsafed a continual assurance that a gun 
should fit its user as his boots his gloves or his 
coat fit him." The gunmaker catering to the desire 
of the very particular sportsman aforesaid is as anx- 
ious as his patron to emphasize the des irabil.ty, U 
not the absolute necessity, of an excellent fit. Thus, 
by constant reiteration it has come to be believed 
that a gun must fit its user or he can not shoot with 
it That in this belief there is a certain gram of 
truth cannot be gainsaid. But carry it to Its logical 
conclusion and the idea is encouraged that if the 
gun does fit, its user must be able to use it to good 
effect. As a matter of fact, there is no "must about 
it, and hence arises a vexatious misapprehension like- 
ly to cause disappointment and give a good gun a 

bid H3.TT16 

Of course, one's gun should fit, but if the shooter 
is a fair shot and has no physical deformity or ab- 
normality, he does not depend for his accuracy upon 
an exact fit. If, on the other hand, he is a poor shot, 
the best fitting available will not, alone, transform hire 
into a good one. Nothing can be more erroneous than 
the idea that it will, for the bad shot, if ever he is 
to become a good shot, must do what all good shots 
consciously or unconsciously do and adapt himself 
to the gun. If he is led to believe that gun-fitting 
will produce for him a weapon that will hold straight 
whichever way he points it, he will be grieviously 
disappointed. . 

When the shooter gets a try-gun adjusted to suit 
him to the best advantage, the gun built to the model 
so produced will not handle like the try-gun, which 
in all probability is just as well, because the try-gun 
is only a gunmaker's fitting appliance, and not a 
sportsman's weapon. In a well stocked gunstore it 
is probable that any man, who is neither abnormally 
big nor small and is free from deformity, could pick 
out a gun from stock that would suit him very well. 
With a little alteration it might suit him better, but 
the weapon being at first well chosen he will prob- 
abily be able to adapt himself to the gun quite as 
well as the gunsmith could adapt the gun to him. 

As% matter of fact, a good shot can shoot well 
with almost any gun. Trap shots have won great 
events with guns of widely different weights and 
measurements. Many professional shooters do not 
bother very much about the exact fit of the gun, 
being usually more concerned to uphold the reputa- 
tion of the name it bears, and the majority of these 
guns are used just as they are received from the 
factory. . 

An instance, in this respect, is cited in the case 
of Dr Carver. His shooting in this country was done 
with a Parker gun of the usual factory measurements. 
In England he bought a gun in the first gunshop he 
visited— again a factory made gun. In Germany he 
shot a gun made in Suhl, and in Spain he used a 
Belgian made gun; shooting up to his average with 
each change of guns. Returning to the United States 
he went back again to his former make— with a 2% 
inch drop, and alternated with the double-barreled 
12 -gauge, such widely differing weapons as a repeat- 
ing shotgun and a double 10 gauge hammerless with 
a Straight stock. 

Dr. Carver's case, like his shooting, was doubtless 
exceptional, but there are always plenty of excellent 
game and trap shots who do not depend upon the 
extreme shooting fit of their guns to produce results. 
Some of the finest shots, whose repute is international, 
are invariably fitted when buying new guns, but 
others who possibly shoot equally well, although their 
opportunities for the display of skill may be more 
limited, never use, and never have the chance to use, 
other than the guns made to factory dimensions. 



Empire Gun Club. 

In a recent communication Secretary J. B. Hauer 
gives the following most favorable report of a suc- 
cessful season and the intimation that this year is 
full of promise for the club's career during 1906. 

On account of the entire satisfaction given during 
the past year and for several years prior all the 
present officers of the Empire Gun Club have been 
re-elected. The same committees have again been 
appointed, which assures the same aggressive move- 
ment that the club has been noted for in the past and 
which has brought the club up to its present high 
standing. The officers are: President, James P. 
Sweeney; vice-president. Dr. George G. Gere; secre- 
tary-treasurer, J. B. Hauer; captain, A. J. Webb; 
lieutenant, W. O. Cullen; sergeant-at-arms, C. A. 
Bennett. The executive committee is composed of 
the following: Dr. Geo. G. Gore, J. B. Hauer, F. S. 
Judah, J. Peltier and Con Roman. 

The club's finances are in first-class shape. Much 
work has been planned for the coming season in 
the shape of more and larger ponds. The new ponds 
put in last year have proven to be exceptionally good 
this winter and duck shooting so far has been away 
ahead of last year or any previous year in the history 
of the club. Quail shooting has also been very good 
and a large number of snipe have been bagged on 
the club's extensive preserves at Elkhorn, Monterey 
county. The new clubhouse, recently built, has proven 
to be a valuable addition and the club's quarters 
throughout are now up to date In every respect and 
are excelled by none In this State. An electric light 
plane to illuminate the building and the grounds 
about the clubhouse is being seriously considered, 
likewise the acquisition of a speedy launch is being 
talked of as an addition for the near future to run 
on the waters of Monterey bay during the summer 
months when salmon fishing affords such great sport. 

A program for the club's trap-shooting section will 
soon be arranged. 

o- 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



In late season upland or blind shooting, when the 
fingers are benumbed with cold they became rather 
too stiff for the finest work in trigger-pulling, and 
to avoid this many shooters have recourse to shoot- 
ing gloves. It is here that the full benefit of the 
single trigger gun comes into play. The elimination of 
the second trigger gives more room to the gloved 
trigger-finger, and it also dispenses with the neces- 
sity of changing from one trigger to the other, as 
must be the case with double triggered guns. It be- 
comes, therefore, so much easier for the gloved finger 
to press the second time, without removal, on exactly 
the same spot, than to change triggers in the small 
space enclosed by the trigger-guard, that one can 
quite well understand the meaning of those sports- 
men who describe the single trigger mechanism as a 
shooting luxury. 

But it is more than a luxury, it is a great aid, in 
such circumstances, to good shooting with both bar- 
rels, particularly so with the left. The difficulty, with 
a gloved finger, of getting back to the second trigger, 
after the first has been pulled, is very great. That 
difficulty is only thoroughly realized after one has shot 
for a few days with a single-trigger gun. Many crack 
wing shots have followed the practice of pulling the 
left trigger first, in field or marsh, because, as It 
has been explained, it was found much easier to get 
forward to the right trigger — the jar of the discharge 
"jumping" the linger forward, for the second barrel, 
than to get back to pull the left trigger. It was also 
argued that the forward movement of the hand and 
trigger-finger for the second shot tended to set the 
gun tighter to the shoulder and consequently give in- 
creased control of it, whereas, the loosening of the 
grip in the backward movement to the left trigger, 
whether consciously or unconsciously, loosened the 
hold on the gun and also took up a fraction of valu- 
able time which could be better utilized in making 
certain the aim with the second shot. 

The abolition, however, of the double trigger, it is 
claimed, now rids the shooter of all of these troubles 
entirely, in addition to giving much more room to 
the trigger-finger, gloved or ungloved. It is just as 
easy, of course, to shoot with the right barrel as with 
the left of a single-triggered gun, and the fact makes 
a great difference in the shooting of many, who can 
shoot more accurately with the left barrel than with 
the right — a very common thing with those who use 
double-triggers. The single-trigger brings up the 
shooting of both barrels to the same level exactly, 
and the luxury of its use is doubly appreciated by 
those who feel the cold while inactive in blind or 
boat or on the hillside and prefer to wear gloves 
when shooting during chilly weather. 



Trap Shooting at Catalina. 

The Avalon Gun Club of Catalina Island, California, 
will hold several live bird shoots at Catalina Island 
during February and March. There will be team and 
individual matches. Two of the events will be of 
championship charcater. One of these will be for in- 
dividual honors and the other for team prizes. 

The cup for the individual championship will be do- 
nated by the Pilgrim Club of Catalina Island. Rules 
of the Interstate Association will govern all compe- 
titions. In addition to the championship events there 
will be several handicap shoots. 

Entries for all the events will close with L. B. 
Woods, president of the Avalon Gun Club, Catalina 
Island, California, on January 30th, 1906. The mem- 
bers of the tournament committee are L. B. Woods, 
Albert Rau, J. B. Colman and Max Blumenthal. 



New Gun Club. 

The Donahue Gun Club is the name of a new club 
recently organized. The club has erected a new cot- 
tage at Donahue and has the same comfortablly fur- 
nished. The members of the club are Joseph Rodgers, 
Frank and Joseph Joseph, and F. F. Santos. 



Excellent Scores Made by the Parker Gun. 

The following is a record of J. F. Hurt, Tazewell, 
Va., for 1905. Mr. Hurt is an amateur shooting the 
Parker gun, with which these scores were made: 
Total number of targets shot at, 7125; total number 
broken, 6621. Average for entire season over 92 per 
cent. 

In the five successive days' shoot at local grounds 
at Tazewell, Va., in August, Mr. Hurt made the 
following score: Saturday, August 26, shot at 100, 
broke 95; Monday, August 28, shot at 100, broke 97; 
Tuesday, August 29, shot at 100, broke 99; Wednes- 
day, August 30, shot at 100, broke 86; Thursday, 
August 31, shot at 100, broke 94; total shot at 500, 
broke 481. Average of over 96 per cent. 

At the shoot at Tazewell Fair, September 12, Mr. 
Hurt broke 94 out of 100, winning first prize and high 
gun. • Second day at Tazewell Fair he broke 189 out 
of 200, winning high gun and first money and first 
prize in all ten events participated in during the 
day, in which contest over thirty shooters participated. 

At the 13th annual tournament of the Arizona 
Sportsmen's Association held at Phoenix, Ariz., De- 
cember 28-31, Mr. J. M. Aitken, shooting a Parker 
gun, was high man on the first day with a score of 
170 out of 174. Mr. Aitken was also high man the 
second day and made a run of 94 straight. The entire 
program called for 550 targets, of which only 345 
counted on general average. Mr. Aitken's average for 
the 345 was 93 1-3 per cent. He also won the Copper 
Queen Trophy,, a silver cup, with a straight 25, and 
the Gwynn Trophy with 29 out of 30, which was a tie 
with another, and on shooting it off in the next two 
events, made 39 to the other's 3S out of 40. Mr. Aitken 
is an amateur, and among others at this shoot were six 
professionals. Mr. Aitken's work is certainly very 
creditable, and all of these scores speak well for the 
"Old Reliable" Parker gun. 



Duck Hunting Notes. 

The recent stormy weather has practically put an 
end to the sport of duck shooting for local sports- 
men. The birds for the time being have scattered to 
the interior puddles and overflowed sections miles 
away from the bay counties marsh shooting districts. 
Some varieties, the canvasbacks, bluebills and the 
few other deep water ducks are still with us. But the 
open water stretches afford the birds safe abiding 
places, where they pass the time leisurely resting in 
flocks, estimated in some districts, of thousands. 

There is of course a certain amount of sport to be 
had by experienced hunters, but generally speaking 
the game of duck hunting is over for the season for 
the local shooters. 

In various localities of the interior, the sportsmen 
now have an inning. To the south in various sections 
of the San Joaquin Valley, duck shooting has muchly 
improved. In the overflowed sections of the Sacra- 
mento and Yolo basins the birds may now be seen in 
countless flocks. 

Throughout the season it has been most notice- 
able that the northern birds have been in better con- 
dition than for years past. Home bred birds have 
hardly had a look in so far as table condition was 
concerned. Canvasback ducks particularly have been 
very much off in condition recently. In this respect 
Mr. Al. M. Cumming, a well known sportsman, is 
quoted: 

"The canvasback duck prefers the wide waters of 
San Pablo and San Francisco bays to the smaller 
bodies of water in the marshes. The canvasback 
would rather be in salt water, if he can, and the 
only thing that will drive him inland to fresh water 
is a storm. Usually we have two or three good blows 
from the southeast before this time of year, and when 
the ducks are driven inland shortly after their ar- 
rival from the north they remain in the same fine 
condition which characterizes them on their first ap- 
pearance here. 

"As long as the ducks stay in fresh water they keep 
their plump condition and their flesh is sweet and 
good to eat, but after they have been on the bay for 
three or four weeks, living on the food they find in 
the salt water, then they lose their fat and soon ac- 
quire the 'fishy' taste that makes them disagreeable 
to the palate, if it does not entirely unfit them for 
serving as food. The other breeds of duck are more 
easily driven from salt water, the canvasback being 
generally the last to go to fresh water and the first 
to come back when the weather gets fine again. This 
season there has been no storm violent enough to drive 
the canvasback from the bay, although the storm a 
week ago made all the other ducks take to the fresh, 
inland waters, and considerably thinned the flocks of 
canvasbacks on the bay. 

"To show you that what I say is right, I can men- 
tion the gadwell, commonly called the gray duck, 
which is very rarely found on salt water. These 
ducks are always fat and juicy, and I have shot them 
at the beginning of the season and also at the end 
of the season, and have invariably found that their 
condition was not changed a whit. From October to 
February the gadwell is always the same. The can- 
vasback and the other species would keep the condi- 
tion they bring from the north if they kept to fresh 
water, but, as I say, most of them prefer the salt 
water, especially the canvasback and the redhead, 
which is a very similar duck." 

The southerly storm last Sunday made shooting 
conditions better for hunters who were out on the 
lower sections of San Francisco bay. 

Hunters returning from the day's shoot about the 
lower bay reported that the water was alive with 
canvasbacks, bluebills and small birds. Sport was 
great, and every gunner came home with big bags of 
game, eager to again scull forth down the slough and 
float about the bay. Guns were popping from Alvlso 
to Alameda, with no interruption of the volleys. De- 
coy shooting along the bay shore was pronounced 
fine and successful sport by many San Jose hunters. 
The weather was just right for a good outing, and 
that most of the local hunters took advantage of the 
day goes without saying. 



Gun Club Takes Protective Measures. 

The Farmers' Hunting and Fishing Club of Marys- 
ville held a meeting recently and arrangements were 
made for funds, etc., to defend any suits that might 
be brought to oust the club members from the pre- 
serves. The following compose the Board of Direct- 
ors: J. A. Littlejohn, Walter Eager, M. S. Peters, W. 
R. Carpenter and Charley Best. 



A. L. Holling's Gordon Setter bitch Flora B. (Dick- 
Vic) whelped on January 23rd six puppies (4 dogs) 
to A. Stuart's Doc (Sport-Trix). 



A Fitting Finale for a Year of Triumphs. 

The amateur trap shooting championship of Amer- 
ica for the year of 1905 was won with the time tried 
and reliable Winchester "Leader" shells. Mr. J. H. 
Hendrickson of the Queens County Gun Club, Long 
Island City, N. Y., captured the Amateur Trap Shoot- 
ing Championship of America at the New York Ath- 
letic Club grounds on December 14th, breaking 94 
out of 100 targets. Mr. John W. Garrett of Colorado 
Springs was second with a score of 93. Messrs. 
Hendrickson and Garrett both shot Winchester 
"Leader" shells, thereby displaying great wisdom as 
well as great skill. If you would shoot to win, you 
must shoot the shells the winners shoot, and they are 
the Winchester make of shells. Their invariable uni- 
formity and reliability, which make them the choice 
of the greater majority of intelligent shooters, are not 
equalled by any other brand of shot gun shells. 



Strike — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 
when you ask for it 



January 27 I90G, 



11 



GLANDERS AND FARCY. 



The veterinary editor of the Breed- 
ers' Gazette of Chicago has written for 
that journal the following very com- 
plete article in regard to these dis- 
eases. 

When we speak of glanders it should 
be dearly understood that there is 
another form of this dread disease — 
farcy— affecting the skin and lym- 
phatics and always accompanied by in- 
ternal lesions indicative of glanders. 
Glanders proper affects internal or- 
gans — lungs, air passages, nostrils. 
Both forms are due to the same germ 
(Bacillus mallei), both are contagious 
to horses, mules and asses and com- 
municable and fatal to man by inoc- 
ulation of a cut or scratch. Both forms 
may either be acute or chronic, are 
more or less virulent in either form 
and recognized as incurable when thor- 
oughly established. 

The disease is spread by the dis- 
charges of the affected animal. Th« 
germs do not float about in the air of 
stables, but are found in the discharge 
which is sneezed onto woodwork, walls, 
partitions, mangers, harness, neck- 
yokes, water troughs, feeding troughs 
or hitching posts. Susceptible horses 
coming In contact with such sources of 
infection are liable to become infected, 
develop the acute form of the disease 
and in turn spread the contagion to 
other horses. 

In a typical case of chronic glanders 
the horse may be little if any reduced 
in flesh or apparently unaffected in 
health. A thin, sticky, whitish or yel- 
lowish discharge comes from his nose, 
adheres about the orifice of the nostrils 
and is blown out upon such articles 
as have already been mentioned. Be- 
tween the jaw, feeling from below, 
will be found grape-like clusters of 
little hard tumors which adhere to the 
bone and are not as a rule sensitive 
nor do they form abscesses and dis- 
charge pus. Letting the sunlight 
s'ream into the horse's nostrils, the 
lining membrane of the cavities and of 
the partition between the nostrils 
(septum nasi) will be seen of a dull, 
bluish cast and covered with ulcers, 
giving the parts a mouse-bitten ap- 
pearance. In addition to ulcers 
(chancres), having ragged, inflamed 
edges and depressed centers, healed 
ulcers will be seen in the form of scars. 
Generally one finds in addition to these 
visible lesions small tumors under the 
skin (enlarged lymphatics) in the arm 
pit and in the groin. In many in- 
stances the patient is emaciated, woe- 
begone, fevered, coughs, is lame in a 
hind leg or has a permanently en- 
larged hind leg, and harsh, staring 
coat. The latter symptoms are more 
likely to be seen In acute glanders 
which comes on suddenly, is character- 
ized by painful swelling and lameness 
of a hind leg, fever, possibly cough, 
discharge from the nostrils and finally 
by the appearance of ulcers as men- 
tioned. 

In farcy ulcers are not seen in the 
nostrils; cough may be present but no 
discharge; hind legs are swollen and 
covered with small "buttons" or 
"buds," which rupture and discharge 
yellowish, sticky matter like raw lin- 
seed oil, but sometimes streaked or dis- 
colored with blood. These character- 



WarranteU to Give Satisfaction. 

Gontbauit's 

Caustic Balsam 




■ 



Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strainea Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheric. Removes all 
Bunches from Horseo or Cattle. 

As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, 3ore Throat, etc., it 1b Invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to (rive satisfaction. Price $1 50 
per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent by ex- 

firess, charges paid, with full directions for 
ts use. faTSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address , 

•The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



istic buds may also appear upon the 
lips, sides of neck or elsewhere upon 
'the body. After bursting they form 
ulcers having ragged edges and dirty 
grey depressions. The lymphatics near 
the ulcers (chancres) become enlarged, 
hot and painful to the touch. 

Farcy may be suspected when horse 
has periodic swelling of one or both 
hind legs', at such times is lame and 
when button-like nodes (bunches) ap- 
pear upon the inside of the legs, break, 
discharge and prove wellnigh Impos- 
sible to heal. Also suspect this disease 
when a horse is thriftless, emaciated 
and shows a tendency to form boils 
or small abscesses on sides of neck, 
about hip, about face or elsewhere on 
body. 

Suspect glanders when horse has fre- 
quent attacks of nose-bleed, fails to 
thrive although fed nutritious food, 
has chronic discharge from one or both 
nostrils which does not flow from the 
nostrils but sticks about orifice, shows 
sores, scars, ulcers or little bunches 
on lining of nostrils and partition un- 
der jaws, chronic cough and tendency 
to periodic swelling of the hind legs. 
Bleeding from the nostrils, sudden 
swelling of the hind legs, and swelling 
of the testicles are often seen in ad- 
vance of a sudden acute attack of 
glanders. 

In differentiating between the dis- 
charge of glanders and that of in- 
fluenza, distemper, strangles or chronic 
catarrh, remember that in these 
troubles ulcers are absent from the 
lining membranes of the nostrils and 
small tumors are not found under the 
jaws which location may, however, 
show large swellings distended with 
pus (abscesses of strangles.) Dis- 
< harge from one nostril or both nos- 
trils characterizeu by an offensive odor 
usually indicates the presence of a 
diseased molar tooth in upper jaw ana 
is often accompanied by bulging of 
the bones of the face under the eye. 
Where distortion of the bones of the 
nose is observed in connection with 
odorless discharge, glanders is to be 
suspected and other symptoms should 
be looked for. It is not always trut. 
that glanders discharge sinks in water 
while that of other diseases floats. 

As it is possible to decide by the 
hypodermic injection of tuberculin 
whether a cow has tuberculosis or not, 
in the same way one readily can de- 
cide whether a horse has glanders or 
farcy by using mallein. which is a 
sterilized extract from a culture of 
glanders bacilli and to be obtained 
from the Bureau of Animal Industry. 
Washington, D. C, State Agricultural 
Experiment stations or any firm handl- 
ing veterinary supplies. It is best used 
by a qualified veterinarian, who at the 
same time will be able to conduct 
necessary quarantine and disinfection 
operations. 

The mode of using mallein follows. 
Temperature of horse is taken at rec- 
tum, by means of a clinical thermom- 
eter, three or four times in one day. 
By this means the average or normal 
temperature of the horse is discovered 
prior to injection of mallein. Mallein 
is injected under the skin of neck of 
horse late on the night of the day 
when the preliminary temperatures 
were taken. Early next morning the 
temperature is taken and this is re- 
peated every two hours until after- 
noon. A marked rise in temperature 
over normal, accompanied by a flat, 
painful swelling at point where needle 
of syringe was inserted in skin, ana 
which continues for several days, may 
be considered surely Indicative of the 
presence of glanders or farcy. 

According to the law of a number of 
States all reacting horses have to be 
destroyed provided there are other ap- 
parent symptoms of the disease. Some 
States pay a partial reimbursement to 
the owner of the horse destroyed. All 
necessitate thorough disinfection of the 
premises occupied by the diseased ani- 
mal, a quarantine and frequent exam- 
ination of horses that have been ex- 
posed. Instances are on record where 
horses showing no visible symptoms of 
glanders or farcy have reacted to the 
mallein test, been quarantined and 
after repeated testing with mallein 
have failed to reacc and been pro- 
nounced cured. No cases are on rec- 
ord, so far as the writer is aware, 
where horses showing typical lesion* 
of glanders or farcy have been cured 
by the use of mallein. 

Under the circumstances- we would 
urgently dissuade owners of horses 
from experimenting with mallein as an 
alleged cure for glanders. The dis- 
ease cannot safely be handled on a 
farm or ranch. The owner endangers 
his own life and surely exposes all of 



his horses to the contagion. He shouh 
at least destroy every horse showini 
plain lesions of glanders and then havi 
the exposed horses examined every tw< 
weeks by a qualified veterinarian oi 
deputy veterinarian. The latter may ' 
if they see fit, make necessary tests 
with mallein, and by this means and 
thorough disinfection of the premises 
will soon stamp out the disease at a 
minimum loss to the owner and for the 
protection of the horses of the neigh- 
borhood. 

It is doubtless a fact that annually 
hundreds of horses are destroyed as 
glandered or affected with farcy, yet 
arc free from those diseases. Glanders 
is properly feared and through ignor- 
ance of its characteristic lesions horses 
afflicted with chronic catarrh, lym- 
phangitis, skin disease or diseased 
molar teeth are sacrificed. Evidently 
the condemning of horses should be 
left to the qualified veterinarian and 
he also should be consulted in seeking 
to stay the spread of the disease in a 
center where it has appeared. 

o — i 

SEC. WILSON ON SHEEP SCAB. 
In his annual report Secretary Wil- 
son has the following on sheep scab: 
"Sheep scab has been one of the 
greatest obstacles to successful sheep 
raising and the department has ex- 
perienced a great deal of difficulty in 
fighting it. Even after the order of 
June 18, 1897, was issued diseased 
sheep continued to arrive in large 
numbers at the principal markets. In 
1898 a bulletin, entitled 'Sheep Scab; 
Its Nature and Treatment,' was issued 
giving full information upon this sub- 
ject and specifying the treatment by 
which the disease might be eradicated. 
This bulletin had remarkable influ- 
ence in educating sheep raisers in 
checking the disease and in informing 
the public as to a possibility of curing 
infected animals. In July, 1899, an 
important order was issued describing 
the manner in which affected sheep 
should be dipped, instead of leaving 
this to the discretion of the owners 
and commission merchants. This or- 
der approved of the tobacco and sul- 
phur and the lime and sulphur dips; 
formulas were given for their prepara- 
tion, and the animals had to be dipped 
in one or the other before they were 
allowed shipment in interstate com- 
merce. 

Sponges— S. Adderley, 307 Market St. 



Standing Offer 

Good always* everywhere. 
$100 Reward, for any lame- 
ness, curb, splint, founder, 
distemper, etc., (where cure 
is possible) that is not cured by 

TUTTLE'S 
ELIXIR 

Greatest horse remedy in the world. Tutlle's 
Family Elixir invaluable for human bruises, 
pains, rheumatism, etc. Send for free 100 pace 
book,"*Veterlnary Experience." The perfect 
horseman's guide. Every disease symptom and 
its treatment. 

Tuttle's Elixir Co.. 52 Beverly St., Boston, Mass. 
Mack & Co. , San Francisco and F. W. Braun, Lot 
Angeles, California Agents. 




High Glass Team For Sale 



pRIGHT BAYS; WEIGH llOO LBS. EACH; 16 
1 ' hands high; well bred; Wilkes stock; well 
broken, gentle, kind disposition; absolutely 
Bound; 6 years old, and a very desirable team In 
every respect. Can be seen at the Hulda Stables, 
1530 Fell St , San Francisco. 



WILLIAM HAROLD 2:131 FOR SALE 

rpHE MEEK ESTATE HAVING BEEN PAR- 
' tltloned, and the breeding of horses discon- 
tinued, the Btalllon WILLIAM HAROLD 2:13)4 
Is olTered for sale or lease to a responsible party. 
William Harold Is by Sidney 3:19%, and bis dam 
Is Cricket 2:10 by Steinway. Cricket Is one of 
the great producing mares of California, being 
already the dam of five in the list and has three 
more foals that will be given records. William 
Harold has had the most limited opportunities 'n 
the stud, jot Is the sire of Janice 2:08)4 trottlDg. 
Dan Hums 2:15 and Judith 2:25 and several others 
in the list He Is in excellent condition, and as 
his get are all large, well made and nicely turned 
horses he should be a good money earner In the 
stud If in good hands. Apply to or address 

H. W. MEEK, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



A GOOD MARE FOR SALE. 

By CLIPPER 2:06, dam by ANTEEO JR. 

T YEARS OLD, TROTS OR PACES; HAND- 
' some, sound and a high-class animal In every 
respect An Al roadster and will make a race 
horse or a valuable brood mare. Reason for sell- 
ing Is that I have no time to devote to handling 
her. Call or address 

Phone: GEO. C. PETERMAN, 

Oakland 6501. 779 Twelfth St., Oakland, Cal. 



Norman Stallion For Sale. 

I \ARK IRON GRAY NORMAN STALLION; 
1 weighs about 1600; 16 hands high; 4 years old. 
I Is blockily built and a sure foal getter. Colts 
can be seen at San Jose. For further particulars 
address W. H. WILLIAMS, 

1120 Alameda Ave., San Jose, Cal. 



McKINNEY'S FASTEST ENTIRE SON 



ZOLOCK 2:05 

Great Race Horse and Producing Sire. 




SIRE OF 



imhn-l, i J, 7'IA1 H » 8 10 Three-Year-Olds that worked 

UIIIUIMl \0) 4-1*4 trials In 1905 as follows: LILIAN 

n A |:igh f1\ ZOLOCK l!:H, KINNKY WOOD 2:lt, 

I'LIIIUII yO) L.l-t.j CLEOPATRA 8:16. RED LOOK 2:18, 

P\ ctmrior- 7* I AH ZOLLIE 2:18. IN AUGUR ETTA 2:23, 

IMMdIIULI A.ltJ HVLOCK 2:25, MA.JELLA 2:25, ADA - 

Chprlfirlr HnlitlPfi ?«K 1 LANTE 2:26, BOLOCK 2:27. and 3 

OllCllUlIt I1VIIIICS L.lo i Two-Tear-Olds as follows: WI N / t 

n; Y ; p c 7-77 2:24, bonme .jiine 2:27, isalco 

171 a il O L.LI 2:30, and 12 others now In training; 

Gondii ta 2*29 that can show quarters In from 33 to 

ZOLOCK S Sire is the Great McKINNEY 2:11 1-4 
His Dam is the great broodmare GAZELLE 2:11 1-2 

(by Gosslper 3:14V), dam of ZOLOCK 2:051^, Zephyr 2:07^! second dam the great broodmare 
Glpsey (by Gen. Booth 2:30H). dam of Gazelle 2:11K, Delilah (3) 2:14'/,, Ed Winshlp 2-15, 
Wl lots (mat.) 2:17, UxleS 2:27, and grandam of Col. Green (trial) 2:10!^, third dam Eoho 
Belle (grandam of Conn 2:15)4) by Echo 462; 4th dam by Lummox and 5th dam by Grey Eagle. 
ZOLOCK stands 16 hands, Is a beautiful brown and a horse of grand proportions. All his colts 
are good-beaded, and there has never been one that went lamo. 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at SAN JOSE, CAL. 

forme ir\r tin- Cpocnn %7*t Season starts February 1st and ends June 1st. 
ILIIII> 1UI IIIC OCtlSUII, <pi«J. Mares will bo cared for In any manner desired, but 
no responsibility for accidents or escapes. 

Also, the Three-Year-Old Stallion 

If* m | by ZOLOCK 2:05',; dam GIP8EY. dam of Gazelle 

g\ f (I 2:11'/,, Delilah 2:H% and three more in the list. Isalco 

1m is a full brother to Delilah (3) 2:14'/,. 

Terms for the Season $25 

HENRY DELANEY. 
Race Track. San Jose. Cal. 

I D A Kl A I T n 24586 Sire, PALO ALTO 2:08 3-4 
K H II H L I U Rec. 2:121 Dam, ELAINE (4) 2:20 

lit AN A LTO'8 sire and dam have both held champion trotting records and his dam and gran- 
dam both produced a oolt that was a world's record breaker, and Ills Krandslre has sired several 
trotters that broke world's records No other horse with a record as fast as IltAN ALTO'S oan 
claim this. At nine years he bad sired ton colts, four of them with rocords as follows: Dr Frasse 
2: ItM ■ Thonns R. 2: 15, Vendome 2:17, Dr. Frasse's Sister 2:25— all at four years old. Who can namo 
a horse whose first ten oolts oan beat that? 

Will Make the Season of 19O0 at WOODLAND, OAL. 
FEE $40 Eor further particulars address 

«20 due when mare Is bred and H. 8. HOGOHOOW. 

120 payable when mare Is known to be In foal. Woodland, C»i 



ISfi 



l January 27 iv> 6 



SPEED, GAIT, QUALITY AND BREEDING 



ATA TVT A O'Q*/' ' (^ rial quarters 33 sec); brown mare; 15.2; foaled 1900; ver> handsome and stylish, with fine action 
.ZxJLjXxJLYLXjL <C.fC / 2 and should trot in 2:15 next season. Winner of the blue ribbon and championship at Montana State 

Fair in 1934, and four blu a ribbDns, champion and grand champion prizes at the Lewis and Clark Live Stock Show. Sire, Alfonso 2:29|, 
dam a performer and producer; second and third dams great brood mares. 

jur a "KTT\r\T T1VT P*P^ p ' ( trial q. uarters 32 sec); bay gelding; 15.3; foaled 1900; a clean, easy pacer; trots up to 
JXLXjLJLM U \J LaJLIM <C.fwU a f or ty dip; e q Ua | to the best; a premium winner at the Lewis and Clark Live Stock Show. 
Sire, Alcone 2:31], 6780, sire of 20 in the list, son of Alcyone 2:27, the greatest Wilkes sire. Dam, Mistral, dam of two others with 

records better than 2:20. 

Tl/TT T3 TJ A (Trial quarters 37 sec); brown gelding; 15.2; foaled 1901; very stylish, extra action, will be very fast; wianer of a 
1VJL JL xSjLa £X blue ribbon at the Lewis and Clark Live Stock Show. Sire, Alfonso 2:29. : , ; , 9700, sire of 23 in the list, son of Baron 
Wilkes 2:18. the great sire of race winners. Dam, Mistral, above, dam of 3 in list. These horses belong to 

C. X. LABBABEE, Brook-Nook Stock Ranch, Home Park, Madison Co., Montana. 

MONTANA PRODUCES THE BEST HORSES IN THE WORLD, everything considered. The above horses have been 

jogged and kept in condition for a year and are in fine shape to train, and can be seen at 

THE PALACE LIVERY CO., 51-53 Dayton St., PASADENA, CAL. 



BUILDING THE DAIRY HERD. 



A recent bulletin from the Ithaca 
College of Agriculture is about the 
dairy hprd. with these among the in- 
troductory words: 

"We may call the milk the main 
product and the calves, beef and me.- 
j ure the by-products of the dairy cow. 
It has been asserted that the milk pro- 
duct is the only thing that should be 
taken into consideration in estimating 
the value of a dairy cow, and that the 
calves and beef should be entirely ig- 
nored by a successful dairyman; but 
in these days of strong competition it 
is not possible to ignore the by-pro- 
ducts, and in any scheme of success- 
ful dairying the calves and beef must 
at least be taken into consideration. 
This does not mean that in any case 
milk-producing qualities are to be 
sacrificed for the sake of the by-pro- 
ducts. It simply means that of two 
animals of equal value for the produc- 
tion of milk, the one that will give the 
rreater return in production of calves 
and value of carcass is more profit- 
able." 

The bulletin truthfully says that 
' there is no be=t breed of dairy cows." 
One of the first questions in the for- 
mation of a dairy herd is the choice of 
a breed and whether the herd shall be 
made up of pure bred or grade animals. 
A pure bred animal is commonly re- 
garded as one recorded in the herd 
books of the respective breeds. A 
grade animal is a pure bred sire upon 
a common or grade dam and there are 
crosses with less and less of the pure 
bred blood. 

The offspring of pure bred animals 
are more valuable then the offspring of 
grades. But by the grading-up pro- 
cess continually selecting the cows 
that are the best producers, it is not 
difficult to establish a herd of grade 
cows that will equal in the production 
of milk any herd of pure bred animals, 
although the by-products will not be 
so valuable. 

A dairy herd may be maintained in 
two ways: First, by continued pur- 
chase of mature animals to replace 
those whose period of usefulness has 
passed. There are many conditions 
under which this may be a wise prac- 
tice. If it is desirable to have the 
whole herd composed of cows in their 
full productive capacity; if there is 
abundant opportunity for selection and 
purchase near at hand: if there Is a. 
reasonably good market for cows that 
are undesirable, and if one has reason- 
able skill in selecting and good ability 
in bargaining, a herd of high produc- 
tive capacity may be more easily ana 
more cheaply maintained in this way 
than by attempting to raise young 
animals to replace those that are worn 
out. 

The other method of maintaining the 
herd is by raising calves to supply the 
place of old cows that are no longer 
profitable Such n herd will always 
contain a considerable number of 
young animals that have not yet 
reached full development and. there- 
fore such a It rd will seldom equal in 
average proBuctior. per animal a her6 
that is maintained wholly by pur- 
chase. At the snme time a greater 
degree of uniformiu • type may be 
maintained where the animals are 
raised. If land is abundant and cheap 
the cost of raising a calf, up to the 
time that she becomes a full developed 
cow, will be less than that of purchas- 



ing a similar animal outright. 

Through force of circumstances by 
far the greater number of dairymen 
must rely on raising the calves neces- 
sary to maintain the herd. This being 
the case the ordinary dairyman will 
need to provide himself with the ser- 
vice of a bull suitable to produce use- 
ful dairy cows. In most cases he will 
need to own this bull, so that the quew 
tion of the selection and care of the 
breeding bull has an important bear- 
ing upon the maintenance of the dairj 
herd. 

Such a bull should be purely bred. 
The progeny that a bull has already 
produced is by far the best index of 
his usefulness; and he should not be 
very old. He should have character- 
istics that indicate vigor of constitu- 
tion and vital activities, such as a 
loose, mellow hide, a bold, bright eye, 
an active gait and disposition. 

In all cases where it is possible it Is 
beter that the bull should run with the 
herd, lest his temper and breeding 
powers become impaired from lack of 
exercise. When this is not feasible his 
powers and temper may be safe- 
guarded by giving him exercise on a 
tread-power or hitching him by a long 
rope or chain to a wire between two 
upright posts. Occasionally he may be 
utilized upon a tread-power for cut- 
ting feed, pumping water, etc., and 
even be broken to work to harness or 
in a cart. 

In order to determine which are the 
good cows for breeding a record of the 
production of each cow must be kept; 
this is much surer than any outward 
signs; also the milk should be tested 
to ascertain the comparative amounts 
of fat. To obtain a complete record of 
a cow it is necessary that the milk be 
weighed and the fat determined at 
regular intervals. The regular use of 
scales and the Babcock test is an in- 
dispensable part of the labor of a pro- 
gressive dairyman. 

But there are certain characteristics 
of form which more or less indicate 
the capacity of a dairy cow. She 
should be wedged-shaped, that is, the 
skeleton of the hinder portion of the 
body should be distinctly more largely 
,l,.velo|'e.l than those of the forward 
portions. She should stand from half 
an inch to an inch and a half higher 
at the hips than at the shoulders. The 
width, as viewed from the front, should 
be distinctly wider behind than before, 
and the depth of the body as viewed 
from the side should be distinctly 
greater behind than before. She 
should also have vigorous powers of 
respiration and circulation. The for- 
mer are indicated by a large, deep, 
full chest, and by large, clean, open- 
air passages, and the latter by prom- 
inent exterior blood vessels, and pink 
complexion of the thinner portion of 
the skin and visible mucous mem- 
branes. She should also have large 
digestive organs. She should have a 
large udder, which is sometimes so 
close to the abdomen and hidden by 
the legs that it is larger than it ap- 
pears. But it should not be fleshy, a 
condition indicated by its appearing to 
be about the same size when empty as 
when full of milk. 



SURREY HORSE WANTED, 

A HIGH-CLASS HORSR SUITABLE FOR 
" surrey. Must bo over 16 bands high, stylish, 
thoroughly broken for city driving, have good 
anion and a good disposition. Give particulars 
where horae ean be seen, price, etc. Address 
. W . rare of Breeder and Sportsman, HU Geary 
treet, San Francisco. 



Long Shaft, Low 
Seat, Pneumatic 

Speed Cart 
especially adapted 
for track use. u 



TOOMEY TWO-WHEELERS 

Give Best Results 

For Racing and Training Purposes. 

Low Seat Racer Sulkies 

the Fastest and Best in the World 

Pneumatic Pole Carts 

for Team Work on both Road and Track 

Pneumatic and High Wheel Jog Carts 

for Road Use 

Send for latest Catalogue to 

CANAL, DOVER, 
onto. U. g. A. 



S, TOOMEY & CO., 



O'BRIEN & SONS, Coast Agents, 
Golden Gate Avenue and Folk street, 
SAN FRANCI8CO, CAL,. 



I sal He Worth Saving 3 

\ J Why trade off or sell at a beggarly price a good I 



Why trade off or sell at a beggarly price a good 
horse just because he "goes lame, "throws a 
»" curb" or develops some other blemish? There 
is nothing in the way of Spavins, Curbs. Splints, 
Windpuffs or Bunches which will not yield 
readily and permanently to treatment with 

QUINN'S 

OINTMENT. 




I)r. K. H. Pavenpnrt, a prominent physician of Sheridan , lnd., 
rrites. 1 have u>ert a number (if remedies for the removal of 
urns, uplints, thickened tendons and tissues generally, but for 
' the last two years 1 have not been without Qulnn's Ointment. I have tested It thor- 
oughly at different times, mid pay without hesitancy ttift it is the only reliable reme-- 
dy of the kind 1 have ever tried. ' r Price Si .00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or** 

I ~" - Jl " w. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall. N.Y. 



FAIRBANKS, MORSE &CO. 

STANDARD SCALES. RAILWAY SUPPLIES, 
GASOLINE ENGINES, STEAM PUMPS, ETC. 

Have Removed from 310 Market Street 

To 168-174 First Street 

CORNER NATOMA, METWEEN MISSION AND HOWARD STS., 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Be Master of These Diseases. 

Not a case of these ailments in horses, sheep or 
dogs that any one cannot promptly cure with 
Dk CRAFT S DISTEMPER & COUGH CURE. 
If yotfr druggist oan't supply It. order direct— 50c 
and tl— money back if it falls. Send a postal 
todav for our valuable booklet, " Veterinary 
Pointers " It is free. 



DISTEMPER 
COLDS 
GRIPPE 
EPIZOOTIC 
COUGHS, E(c. 

WELLS MEDICINE CO., Chemists & Germologists, 1 3 Third St., Lafayette, lnd 

D E NEWELL, General Agent for Pacific Coast, 619 Mission 8t., San Francisco, Cal 




STALLION TO LEASE 

To some oompetent horsemen that can furnish 
himself and take In charge 

EDWARD B. by STAM B. 
dam by Deiter Prince, to take the route between 
Rio Vista and Courtlaod and vicinity of D S. 
Mathews' home ranch on Grand Island. The 
horse Is in good condition and ready for work 
If the route isn't satisfactory another can be 
chosen. For further particulars write to 

D. S. MATTHEWS, Ryde, Cal. 



FOR SALE, 

\ FIVE-YEA R-OLD COLT, 14.2 hands high: 
*» weighs 900 pounds; bright sorrel In color; 
perfectly sound and can run a quarter of a mile 
In 23 seconds or better. He Is one of the most 
beautiful and best bred sprinters In the State. 
Suitable for a polo pony. Will sell at a reason- 
able price. Address 

SOL SHOCKLEY, Merced, Ca'. 




At the 
Tongues End 

STOCK GET JUST ENOUGH AT THE RIGHT TIME. 

C0MP RE55ED PURE SALT BRICK5. 
AND PATENT FEEDER! 

No waste, no neqlect.all convenience 
Your dealer hd 5 it. Write us for the booh. 

BELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

BrooKlyn, N.V. 



January 27, 19C6J 



13 



AROUND THE DAIRY. 



To go from the fresh air into the 
milk room is a good way to detect ob- 
jectionable odors. The cultivated nose 
is invaluable for sucn purposes. 

There are times when one strain ot 
cows are more popular than others. 
With the Jerseys, tne Flying Foxes, 
the Golden Lads, the Comassies anu 
the St Lamberts have each had their 
day. All were good, and there are oth- 
ers just as good, and better, to follow. 

Too much liberty is believed by 
some to make poor milkers. This is 
certainly the case where there is not 
plenty of feed. Cows with too much 
liberty are not good milkers. When 
confined in close quarters and well fed 
they often do their best. 

It still continues to be a wondei that 
men bestow more time and feed upon 
their horses than they do upon then 
cows. They curry and feed the horse 
for appearance. If the cow was treat- 
ed with the same care, not only would 
her appearance be improved, but she 
would give more milk. 

Cows seem to be naturally mischief- 
makers. They are inquisitive, prowl- 
ing around, seeking what they can 
find This leads them over the fences, 
and through the fence into the neigh- 
bor's fields. This is one of the strong- 
est arguments for good fences and 
plenty of feed in her pasture 

Many things interefere with the 
making of good butter. Buter should 
be churned at a temperature from 40 
to TO degrees according to the season 
and the nature of the food. There is 
more danger of churning at too high 
a temperature than at too low. The 
butter is often soft and the reason is 
that it is too warm. 

It is a wrong calculation that ex- 
pects the butter to be better than the 
conditions which produce them. No 
crop is better than the seed, no cow is 
better than the feed, and no butter is 
better than the milk and the manage- 
ment. He miscalculates who expects 
it to be so. 

When churning, if the cream foams 
it is too cold, and should be set into 
hot water until it is warmer. If the 
butter comes at all it will be crumbly. 
When the churn is set into the water it 
should be as high on the outside as 
the cream is on the inside. The water 
should not be poured into the churn, 
whether it be warm or cold, until aftei 
the churning is finished. 

When the butter begins to come a 
little cold water should be thrown into 
the churn. It will hasten the coming, 
and assist in its gathering. The milk 
may be poured through a strainer, 
then pour in water and wash the but- 
ter To prepare the churn properly, it 
should be rinsed first with cold water, 
then with hot water, then cooled off 
with cold water. When the butter is 
to be first class there can be no hap- 
hazzard methods; the cream should 
be weighed, so that the proper amount 
of salt and coloring matter can be put 
in without guess work— Texas Far- 



Deposit Tour 
Idle Funds 



WITH THE 



Central Trust Company 
of California 



42 Montgomery St. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Toghill Stud 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sura 
large or small. 

NTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNUALLY 

3 1-4% on Ordinary Savings 
3 6-10% on Term Savings 

Send for Booklet, 
"THE SCRE WAY TO WEALTH.' 



The Perfectly Galted Trotting Stallion 

ALTA VELA 2:11 1-4 

(Reg. No. 22449) 

81r«. ELECTIONEER, sire of 166 In 2:30 and 
grandslre of Major Delmar 1:59%. 

Dam. LOKITA 2:18'/, (dam of AUa Vela 2:ll>A 
and Palorl2:24K> by Piedmont 2:17^; jeoond 
c"am Lady Lowell (dam of Lady well 2:16^ 
and Lorlta 2:18'/,) by St. Clair; third dam, 
Laura, dam of Doe, sire of Occident 2:K%. 
Address all communications to BREEDER 

AND SPORrSMAN,36 Geary St., San Franclsoo 



FOR SALE OR LEASE, 

Two Prince Airlie Stallions. 

FOKTOLA 37413, a handsome golden bay 
years old, 16 hands, weighs 1190 lbs. 

MENLO BOY 37401, a magnificent brown with 
white points, 6} ears old, 16.1 hands, weigh: 
1200 lbs. 

These two horses are full brothers being sired 
by Prince Airlie 28045: he by Guy Wilkes 2:15* 
sire of Fred Khol 2:072£. Hulda 2:08k, Seymoui 
Wilkes 2:08^: first dam Signal by Del Sur 2:24 
seoond dam Lady Signal 2:35^ by Signal 3327 
Both of these horses are very fast for the amounl 
of worn, being only a few months last year, show 
lng quarters around :34 and 35. 

For further Information apply to 

P. H. McEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal 



McMURRAY 




McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 
■Oaf-Address for printed matter and prices 

W. J. Kenney 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



A BAD HITTER. 

His Bdnohea and Bruises can be re- 
moved quickly without stopping 
work with 

Absorbine 

This remedy cures Lameness, kills 
Pain, Removes any Soft Bunch with- 
out blisteriiiL! or removing the hair, 
a n (I pleasajit to use. $2.00 per 
bottle, delivered, or at dealer's. 
ABSORBINH, JR.. for mankind, #1.00 Bottle. 
Allays lnllammation rapidly. Cures strains. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

64 Monmouth Street. Springfield, Man 

For sale by Mack&Co Langiey &MlchaelsCo. 
ewdtngton & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. MoKerron 
an of San Franolsoo 




TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISADERO ANU FULTON STS. 
(1408 Fulton Street) 

Horses Called For, Clipped and Delivered 

AT POPULAR PRICES. 
BUSINESS HORSES FOR 1JIKK. 

I have opened a new Boarding and Training 
Stable near the above corner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving, a 
limited number of first-class horses at reasonable 
rates Have good location, brund-newstable and 
everything first-class All horses In my oare will 
receive the best of attention. 
Phone: Park 573. T. C.CABNEY 



JACK FOR SALE. 

A BLACK JACK WITH LIGHT POINTS 
A large, heavy boned, prompt and a gooo. han; 
dler Is a good foal getter and his foals are. 
excellent Individuals. Price very reasonable for 
Drompt sale. Address for further particul ars, 
S. B. WRIGHT, Santa Rosa. 



672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1HBKLI. & SON, Proprietor*. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Boarding, Training and Bundling all kinds 
Fancy Horses. A few Nloe Rigs on hand. Ta'/ 
any oar going to the Chutei. Tel.: West 259 



(Property of Stephen T. Britten) 



SQUIRE 

OF 
CHESTER 




Blue 
Roan 



THE LATEST IMPORTED ENGLISH HACKNEY 

SQUIRE OF CHESTER 

A few engagements ma.y be booked for high-class, well-bred mares. 

WILLIAM WALKER, Manager, Menlo Park, Cal. 

More Standard Performers Than Any Other SIDNEY Stallion in California. 



AlnilAAn A By SIDNEY 2:19 3=4 

m. U a ■ MB SB |J a | # . 1 U-ire of 19 in 2:15 list and 

m III flttflrB II I mM mm I m V lD " st and s|re Sidney 

111 llffl I Ffc #111 ■ Dillon, sire LOU DILLON 



Sire of 

enoch 2:131,4. general 2:141,4, teddy 

THE KOAN »:17H, LITTLE MISS 2:17y. 
MARCHIONESS 2:29. LILLIAN MDMORE 
2:241/4 and TIP OQCANDO (trial) 2:09^. 
SID ABBOTT (trial) 2:18, JAKE F, (trial 
half mile) 1:05. 



dam Mamie Harney 

by The Grand Moor; next 
dam Sarpy Mare by Echo 

462. 



SIDMOOR 2A7U is a dark bay stallion 
and a grand individual In every respect. 
He is one of the best producing sons of 
Sidney, and with the right cross will get 
Lou Dillon speed. 



Season 1906 at Concord Race TracK and at Pacheco. 

Fee $30 for Season. Addre88 

Usual Return Privileges. 



JOHN OTT, Pacheco, Cal. 



R. AMBUSH 



41840 

Rec. (3) 2:14i 



SEASON 1906. FEE $30. 

At ASSOCIATION PARK, 2 miles east 
of San Bernardino. 

Address g. W. BUNNELL, Redlands. 



*W SPAVIN CURE < 





Tuscola, Ills., Nov. 15, 1005. 
TROY CHEMICAL CO., 

Ulnghamton, N. Y. 
Dear Sirs:— Yours of Nov. 1 1 tli. asking about 
results wiih ' Save the-Horse" Spavin Cure re- 
ceived yesterday, and In reply can say that I had 
a driving horse with a bony growth on one of his 
front knees so bad that the leg was stiff and had 
to be moved sideways to go. My attention was 
called to "Save-the-Horse" Spavin Cure by my 
asking my druggist for something that would 
helpor cure It, and he called my attention to this 
remedy and guarantee. I was fearful that It had 
been too long standing to be cured, and had him 
write the company and see what they thought 
about the oase. In a short time got letter from 
the company to sell me the Cure on theguarantee. 
So I brought it out and commenced using it as 
directed and did not notice anv effeot for ten 
days— then a dlmlnishment could be seen, and 
before I had used all the medicine could not no- 
tice a particle of larnfiness and the enlargement 
had nearly all gone. Have been using the horse 
all the time since, and notice no lameness In that 
leg whatever. I would not have believed any 
medicine could havedonethe work so effectually. 
I have recommended it to several neighbors and 
think "Save-the- Horse" is unexcelled. 

Yours sincerely, P. J. GATES. 



Mamaroneok, N. Y.,Nov. 7, 1905. 
TROY CHEMICAL CO , 

Blnghamton, N. Y. 
Gentlemen:— About eighteen months ago I had 
a black horse with a bone spavin I had him fired 
and blistered several times and it did not seem 
to do one bit of good. One day a horse trainer 
told me he thought ' Save-the-Horse" might do 
him some good. I tried It and after using half a 
bottle I found my horse was perfectly sound 
again. Tberastof the bottle I used on another 
horse that had a large shoe-boll, and In a short 
time the shoe-hnll disappeared. 

Yours very truly. 

JOHN LYNCH, 
122 Wintleld Ave. 



Burlington, Iowa, Nov 14, 1905 
The case on whloh I used "Save-the-Horse" was 
a bog spavin of six months standing. I appliPd 
one-half of a bottlo and the hock isnow clean and 
sound. I think "Save-the-Horse" fills a long felt 
want 

Very respectfully, 

WALTER C. MOORE. 



"Save-the-Horse" Permanently Cures Spavin, Ringbone (except low Ring- 
bone), Curb, Thoroughpin, Splint, Shoe Boil, Wind Puff, Injured Tendons and 
all lameness without acar or loss of hair. Horse may work as usual. 

s\f\ per bottle. Written guarantee— as binding to protect you as the 
4^^«UU best legal talent could make U. Send for copy and booklet. At 
druggists and dealers or express paid. Scores of lotters to confirm and convince. 
Send for copies. Absolute and overwhelming evidence and certainties as to the 
unfailing power of "Save-the-Horse." 



TROY CHEMICAL CO. 



BINGHAMTON, N. ' 

Formerly Troy, N. Y. 

D. E. NEWELL, PacificCoast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 



14 



[January 27, m<> 



THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 *» 

will serve a limited number of Approved Mares, Season 1906 

FEE - - - $75 

Reductions made f r two or more m&res. 

Manager, WALTER SKA L Y. 



BONNIE DIRECT (4) 2:05' 




SIRE OF 



BONALET (3) 2:09',, World's Record for 3-year-old Pacing Fillies 
BONNIE ME ■ 3 . Trial (Trotting) 2:11 1 

Season of 1906 at Pleasanton-Fee $100 

WITH RETURN PRIVILEGE. Should horse die or be sold the service fee 
for mares not proving in foal will be returned. 

The facilities for care of mare or mares and foals is unsurpassed. 

C. L. GRIFFITH, 



DR. E . G. McCONNELL 

705 Sutter St.. San Francisco. 



pleasanton, cal. 



WORLD'S CHAMPION RACE HORSE 

SEASON OF 1906 AT PLEASANTON 

STAR POINTER 1:591 — 

Sire of 

Sire BROWN HAL 2:12 1-2 by Tom Hal Jr 



1897..... 

The Fastest, Gamest and Most Consistent 
Race Horse In Turf History. 

MORNING STAR 2:03, JOE POINTER 8:05;*. 
SIUNKY POINTER 2:074, SCHLEY POINTER 2:08^, etc. 



Sire of 




Star Pointer 


....1:59m 


Hal ulllard 


....2:0iH 


Star Hal 


....2:04?4 


Hal Cnaffln 


....2:05« 


Elastic Pointer 


...,2:06'/4 


New Richmond 


... 2:07« 


Hal Braden 


....2-.07H 


Storm 


....2:08K 


Brown Heels 


2:09 H 


Laurel 


....2:0»H 


Silver Hal 


2:10 



Dam SWEEPSTAKES by Snow Heels 

Dam of 

Star Pointer 1:69m 

Hal Pointer 2:04 

Elastic Pointer 2:06'/ } 

Cloud Pointer 2:24J< 

Tennessee Pointer 2:243£ 

2 producing sons 

6 producing daughters 



etc. 



6 producing sons, 2 producing daughters 



Service Fee - - - 

With Usuil Return Privilege 



$100 



GRECO 



CHAS. De RYDER. Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 

Get the Blood that Produced the Champions, SWEET MARIE 
and LOU DILLON, by Breeding to 

BLACK COLT, FOALED 
1900. Sire, McKINNKY 
8:1 I . sire of SWEET 
MARIE 2:01«, Kinney 
Lou 2:07ȣ. Charley Mac 
2:07?£, Hazel Kinney 2:094, Thi Roman 2:09! i, Dr. Hook 2:10. Coney 
2 02, China Maid 2:054. You Bet 2:07. Jennie Mao 2:09. Zolock 2:054 
Dam, AILEEN 2:26VJ (dam of Mowitza 2:20(4, Sister 2:20 and 
GRECO 2:3i, trial 2:20) by Anteeo 2:16! sire of dams of Dlreotum 
Keily 2:0»4. Grey Gem 2:09^4, W. Wood 2:07, etc 

Grandam, LOU MILTON (dam of LOU DILLON 1:58(4, Red- 
wood 2:Jl'/„ Ethel Mack 2:25 and Aileen 2:26(4) by Milton Medium 
2:25"; (sire of 2 and dams of 5) by Happy Medium 2:32'4, sire of 
Nancy Hanks 2:04, eto. 

GRECO Is a handsome black stallion and a natural and fast trotter. He won his only race as a 
colt, and has shown ml lei In 2:20 slnoe In his work, and Is a sure 2:10 trotter. He will be permitted to 
serve a limited numbar of mares tt WlOO THIS SEASON. Correspondence solicited. Address i 

CHAS. De RYOER, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 




CONSTRUCTOR 39569 

By McKINNEY 2:111. Dam and Grandam Great Brood Mares, 

Full Brother to TOM SMITH 2:13 1-4 

First dam DAISY S. (dam of Tom Smith 2:134, General Vallejo 2:20^, Little Mac 2:27^4, Sweet 
Rosle 2:28J£) by McDonald Chief 3583; second dam Fanny Rose (dam of Columbus S. 2: 17, George 
Washington 2:l6 3 i, who sired Stella2:15!4, Campaigner 2:264, etc , and Fanny, dam of Scotty 3:l9\i, 
Trilby 2:JlJi, etc.). CONSTRUCTOR Is one of the handsomest sons of the great McKinney on the 
Coast. He stands 15 hands 2(4 lnohes over the withers and 15 hands 3(4 Inches over the loins and 
weigh? 1100 pounds. He never made a regular season In the stud, but was bred to several mares 
when three years old and all of his get are of good size and good lookers. 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at Thomas Smith's Barn, Vallejo, Cal. 
Service Fee $25, with usual return privilege. 

For further particulars address 

JAS. A. SMITH, 1021 Georgia St., Vallejo, Cal. 



VICTOR VERILHAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. McGRATH 

Manager 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 2 

Oor. of Orove and Baker Streets, Just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 

(Take Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars) 

Best looated and healthiest Stable In San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand for 
saLe. Careful and experienced men to oare for and exercise park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladles oan go and return to stable d not have their horses frightened by automobiles 
•r oars. 



STALLION OWNER! 

If You Need a Stallion Card or Stock Catalogue Compiled and Printed, Stallion Poster, 
Stallion Service Hook, a Cut of Your Horse, a Horse Book of any kind or a Tabulated 
Pedigree), Get it where you can get the CHEAPEST and BEST. 

FOlt SAMPl.KS AM> PRICES ADDRESS 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO., 358 Dearborn St., CHICAGO. ILL,. 



:::: : | • • • • j 

^•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••iij.s;:. 

Pedigrees 
Tabulated 



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OF 



Standard Bred 



AND 



California Trotting Bred 



Giving: Performances of the Get 
of Sires and Dams, etc. 



Thoroughbred Pedigrees 

Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates 



BREEDER & SPORTSMAN 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

••••••••••••••••••••• »••••»•••••••••••» 9 »Z ■ 



••••••••••••••••• 

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• ••••• 

• ••••• 

• ••«.. 

• ••••• 

••«> 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 
AND TRAINERS 



75 PER CENT 

USE AND RECOMMEND 

Campbell'sHorse Foot Remedy 

SOLD BY 

W. A. SAYRE Sacramento, Cal 

R. T. FRAZIER Pueblo, Colo 

J G. READ & BRO Ogden, Utah 

JUBINVILLE & NANCE Butte, Mont 

A. A. KRAFT CO SpokaDe, Wash 

A. F. HOSKA HARNESS CO Tacoma, Wash 

McSORLEY & HENDERSON Seattle, Wash 

C. RODDER Stockton, Cal 

WM. E. DETELS Pleasanton, Cal 

W. C. TOPPING San Diego, Cal 

JEPSEN SADDLERY CO Los Angeles, Cal 

C. A. SCHWEITZER Fresno, Cal 

H. THORWALDSON..: Fresno, Cal 

JNO. A. McKERRON San Francisco, Cal 

JOS. McTIGDE San Francisco, Cal 

BRYDON BROS. HARNESS MFG CO 

Los Angeles, Cal 

JAS. B. CAHPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 4 12 W.Hadison St., CHICAGO, ILL. 




PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This spaoe of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 

WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location In the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



3 



THOMPSON'S SALE AND TRAINING STABLES 

PLEASANTON RACE TRACK 

One of the Best Equipped Training Stables in California. 

Owners desiring to have horses handled and put in condition for sale or; racing are Invited to 
correspond with the undersigned. 

JAS. THOMPSON, Pleasanton, Cal. 



January 27, 19C6] 



15 



DUCK SHOOTERS! BOOKS FOR STALLION OWNERS 

QUESTION—Why is it that so many excellent wing 

shots cripple fine birds? 
ANSWER—Because they don't use 

BALLISTITE 

which never fails to kill clean. 
REMEMBER- -One (I) dead bird in the pocket is 
worth two (2) in the tule. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES SACRAMENTO 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 




1. Hoover's Stallion Service Record. 

The most complete book for recording Stallion service ever placed before breeders. 
Not a pocket edition. No more disputing of sires. No more mixing of dams where this 
book Is used. There Is space for entering 100 mares, giving their full breeding, description, 
dates of service, dates of foaling, etc., with Index, complete, size 10x7,^. Kach book Is 
handsomely and substantially bound $2.00 

t£. The Standard Stallion Service Hook. 

The neatest Service Book published, containing space for entering 100 mares, giving 
space for full description, pedigree, date of service* and refusals, date of foaling, etc., with 
Index complete, neatly bound in leatherlne, suitable for pocket use $1.00 

Breeder's Note and Certificate Book and Stallion Service 
Book Combined. 

This book contains 75 blank certificates to be given to owners of mares, certifying 
that said mare has been bred to a certain stallion. Also 75 notes suitable for owner of mare 
giving to owDer of stallion on account of stallion service fee. This book Is well bound, and 
makes a book like No. 2, after certificates and notes have been removed $1.00 



ADDRESS 



BHHEDBR AND SPORTl 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 




NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 



Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 



We Make 16 urades, $17 75 to $300. Write for ART CATALOG to 

THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

?, r Coast Branch.JHILJ^BEKEART CO.. 114 Second St., San Francisco 

The^Hunter 

Is Absolutely 
Perfect 




One-Trigger 

BECAUSE 

The mechanism Is positive In Its 
action. Farts are large and 
strong It never bains nor 
doubles; In fact, it does just 
what wo say It will and does 
It every time. 




BALL BRAND. 



I A warded Gold Medal 
At California State 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner who 
values his a took should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand, ft 
(Improves and keeps 
'stock In the pink of 
condition. 

rianhattan Pood Co 

1 263 Folsom St., San Franolaco 
Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 



.. GAME GETTER 

doesn't allow rust on his gun — 
..jilherdocs" J-in-one." Heavy 
oils and greases cannot prevent 
rust because they simply coat 
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nks into the pores of 
he metal, forming a 
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nts rust or 
rnish on 
e barrel 
ore, a 
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zine 

triggers, etc. Our booklet tell 
— a sample proves — both free. 

G. W. COLE CO 
138 Washington Life Bldg.. New York 

J 



HUNTER ARMS CO., FULTON, NEW YORK. 

SMITH GUNS SHOOT WELL. 



THE GUN OF 
QUALITY 



Parker 

STANDS FOR 

Quality 

135,000 IN USE, 




Quality I* of paramount Importance. THE PARKER GUN Is ths 
recognized standard of the world and stands today better than 
ever. The best gun value In the world; DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR 
U cannot be equaled. We never have made cheap, trashv guns 

and the PARKER is always found cheapest In the end. The OUN for TOD. This Is a 
good time to begin to get ready for next season. Let us assist you. Write today. 



N. Y. Salesrooms: 32 Warren St. 



30 Cherry St,, Meriden, Conn, 



SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send for 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
jQorolBl school on the Paoiflo CoaBt. 30,000 gradu- 
ates; 80 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 800 students 
annually placed In positions. Send (or catalogue. 



E. P. HEALD. President. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



Photo Engraving Company 

HI OH CLASS ART 
IH 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artlstlo Designing. 
506 Mission St. oor. First, San Francisco 



COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PKJS 

rOR BALM IN LOTS TO SDIT BT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

2 OS California Street, San Franolsoo, Cal. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



-IJEAIJ8K8 IN- 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



B5-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 

Tbliphonb Maim 199 

CALIFORNIA 



O. P. KERTELL. Manager. 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points, 
Standard, Care, 
Training Etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENT8 

The instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
to other breeds as well as to Cockers, and It is a 
useful book for the dog owner. Tells how to 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE BT THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO CAL. 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertiiemenls under thit head one cent per word 
per insertion. Ca$h to accompany ordtr. 



GREAT DANES. 



HREAT DANE PUPS (BLUEBEARD-MAUD 
S.) for sale; eight weeks old. O. BERG- 
STEN, Center-street Station, Oakland. 

GORDON SETTERS. 

TfOR SALE— PUPPY AND BROKEN DOGS 
x DEO. H STONE. Box 12. Fresno. Cal. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 

"HOWARD SHORTHORNS' — QUINTO 
HERD— 77 premiums, California State Fairs 
1902-3-4. Registered oattle of beef and milking 
families for sale. Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Franoisco. 



PETER SAXE & SON, Llok House, 8. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. Hlgb- 
olass breeding stook. Correspondence soliolted. 



HOLSTEINS — BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at State and oounty fairs, 
show ring, and every butter oontest since 1885 in 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F. 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Franolsoo. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DCRHAM8. 
Dairy Stook speolally. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1878. William Niles & Co.. Ikjb Angeles 
Oil. 



VETERINARY. 



IDr*. W xxx, F*. XJsetxx. 

M. R. O. V. S., F. E. T. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg 
Veterinary Medloal Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
I nape c tor for New Zealand and Australian Colonic* 
at the port of San Franolsoo; Professor of Equina 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President ot 
the California State Veterinary Medloal Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residenoe and Office, 
San Franolsoo Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Franolsoo: 
Telephone Park 128. 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh ol the Bladder 

Cored In 48 Honrs. 



CAPS ULES 



Superior to Copaiba, Capebs or Injection 



16 



[January 27, 1906 



TELEPHONE 




VRSE BOOTS 



THE BEST 




AMMUNITION 



THERE IS FOR 

REMINGTON 




SHOOTING 

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NEVER MISSES FIRE 




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Pacific Coast Depot: 86-88 FIRST ST., S AN F RANCISCO, CAL. E. E. DRAKE, Mgr 

7flj\raiEsm 



WERK AWARDED HIE 



ONLY GRAND PRIZE 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



DU PONT SMOKELESS 



la the lead as usual. 



The Official Records show that 
High Average for the year of 1905 

THE REAL WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP 

was won by 
Mr. Fred Gilbert 
who broke 95.6 per cent of the 

17,065 targets he shot at. 
Mr. Gilbert, of course, used 

f* DU PONT SMOKELESS 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

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INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
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When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg,, 49 Second St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



LAFLIN& RAND BRANDS 
in 1905. 

HIGH AMATEUR AVERAGE 
for the Entire Season of 1905 
was won by 
Mr. J. W. Akard, Falrplay, Mo., 
who used 

"NEW SCHULTZE" 

and broke 91 psr cent of all targets 
shot at In tournaments. 

LAFLIN & RAND BRANDS 

"INFALLIBLE" 
"NEW E. C. (IMPROVED)" 



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also won THREE out of the 
FIRST FOUR HIGH AVERAGES 
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Clabrough, 

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These are the Brands of 



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SHELLS 



PACIFIC 

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SUPERIOR 

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2 



[February 3, 190« 



KLIIVTISTEY LOU I1ST THE 




HAWTHORNE 2:06 1-4 



BILLY BUCK 2:07 1-4 



KINNEY LOII 2:07 3-4 



\£ | |V I IV I C\f I I 0-/^^3 THE FASTEST TROTTING SON 

rvl IN IN EL T LUU ^.U / 4 of the champion sire 



Will make the Season of 1906, commencing February lit, ending; July 1st, at 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, SAN JOSE, CAL. 

TERMS $10O. $50 due when mare is bred and $50 payable when mare is known to be in foal, 

BUDD D0BLE, San Jose, Cal. 



For farther Information, pedigree and description address 
PHONE: JOHN 2481. 



MENDOCINO 22607 

RECORD (THREE-YEAR-OLD) 2:19!; 

Sire of Monte Carlo 2:07« (to wagon 2:08%); Idollta (2 y. o.) 2:21 (3 y. o.) 2:12, (a) 2:09*, Leonora 
2:12Vi, Polka Dot 2-. 144, etc. Bay Stallion, 15.3; i bands; weight 1190 pounds; hind feet and 
ankles white; foaled April 24, 1889. Bred at Palo Alto Stock Farm. 

Sire, ELECTIONEER 128. son of Hambletonlan 10. First dam, MANO (dam of MENDOCINO 
(3) 2:194, Electant 2:194 Morocco (3 y.o. trial 2:22) by Piedmont 904, 2:17*; second dam, Mamie 
(dam of Mamie W (3)2:17*, Hyperion 2:312*. Memento 2:25> 4 , Mithra (p) 2:14*) by Hamble- 
tonlan Jr. 1882; third dam, Ullda (thoroughbred) by imp. Mango. 
MENDOCINO la one of Electioneer's youngest and best sons With very limited opportunities 

io the stud he has proven his worth by producing such racehorses as Monte Carlo and Idollta. Three 

new additions to his 2:30 list were made last season, and he now has ten standard performers. His 

foala are good size, fine lookers, bold and pure gaited and easily developed. 
SERVICE FEE for Season of 1906, »76; usual return privilege. 

MCKENA 39460 

Brown Stallion; 18.2 hands; weight 1350 pounds; foaled April 11, 1900. Bred atPalo AltoStock Farm. 
Sire, BIoKINNEY 8818 (record 2:1 1*). First dam, HELENA 9:11k (damof Wildnutllng 2:11*; 
Dobbel 2:22, Hyita (trial 2:12) by Electioneer 125; second dam, Lady Ellen 2:294 (dam of six in 
list, Including Helena 2:11*, Ellen Wood 2:14*) by Mambrlno 1789; third dam, Ida May Jr. by 
Owen Dale; fourth dam, Ida May by Belmont (Williamson's). 
McKENA has proven a remarkably sure f Dal getter. He should make a great sire as he is a floe 
individual and bred right. His sire, McKlnney, a game and fast racehorse and sire of game and 
fast racehorses. His dam, Helena, one of the fastest and gamest daughters of Electioneer, the 
greatest sire of trotters the world has yet known. His second dam, Lady Ellen, was one of the best 
of her day, and as well as her daughter Helena is a great broodmare. 1 
SERVICE FEE for Season of 1906, S40; usual return privilege. 

MENDOCINO and McKENA will make the season at PALO ALTO STOCK FARM. Ma e, 
may run on pasture at 15 per month. No responsibility assumed by the Palo Alto Stock Farm for 
Injury or escapes. Address all communications to , 

PALO ALTO STOCK FARM, 
Stanford University, Santa Clara Co , Cal. , 



McMURRAY 




RACING! 




New California Jockey Clio 
OAKLAND TRACK 

Six or More Races Each Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE 

RACES COMMENCE AT 2 P. M. SHARP 

For Special Trains stopping at the Track take 
S. P. Ferry, foot of Market Street— leave at 12, 
thereafter every twenty minutes. No smoking in 
last two cars, which are reserved for ladies and 
their escorts 

Returning, trains leave Track after fifth and 
last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



PHENOL SODIQUE 

hoals 

SORES, CUTS 
and BITES 



McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER 

«9-Address for printed matter and prices 

W. J. KENNEY 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Man and Beast. 

Keep Handy for 
Accidents. 

Cure* 

MANCE & SCRATCHES 
on Dogs. 

For Sale 
By All Druggist*. 

Recomm naed by this 
publication. 



HANCE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA. 



Mc Kinney, 2!11% 

World's Leading Sire of Extreme Race Horse Speed. 



FEE, $500.00 

•fFees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No return privilege, 
but fee returned if mare fails to produce a foal. Keep, $2. per week. Our 
terms are rigidly adhered to in all cases, and we cannot deviate from them. 

McKinney is now located at the farm, 1 milet from Cuba. 

Mention ihU journal 
when writing. 



Eiw fonpto fllity 3FarmB, newyork. 



McKINNEY DIRECTOR NUTWOOD 

THE STAND ARO-UR ED TROTTING STALLION 

TJNIMAK 40936 

y McKinney 2:11J; dam Twenty-Third by Director 2:17; second dam Nettie 
Nutwood (dam of Hillsdale 2:15J) by Nutwood 000. 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at PALO ALTO, Cal. 

Usual return privileges or money refunded at the option of the owner of the mare. 

Terms, $40 for the Season 

To Cloae June 1st. 

Address or apply to CAPT. C. H. WILLIAMS, 

Box 151, PALO ALTO, CAL 

WAYLAND W. 225ifi L^cbrd 2:12$. 

ONE OF THE LEADING SIRES OF 2:10 PERFORMERS OF 1905. 

-Sire of Bolivar 2:06%, leading money earning pacer of season 1905. Sire of 
Morosco 2.12 highest class trotter on California circuit in 1904. Wayland W. is 
by Arthur Wilkes 2:28. dam Lettie (dam of Wavland W. 2:12»A, Welcome 2-10V& 
Maud Singleton 2:28) by Wayland Forrest. Although Wayland W has never' been 
mated with mares by Electioneer. Director, Nutwood, Sultan. Stamboul Anteeo or 
any of our great sires, he is the sire of Bolivar 2:06%, Nellie R. 210. Arthur W 
2:11%, Morosco 2:12, John A. 2.12%, Forrest W. 2:14%, Leland W. 2:16 Al Sandy 
2:19%. Maud Sears 2:21, Bonita Wilkes 2:26%. Wayland W. will make the 
Season of 1906 at SANTA ROSA, at McGregor & Hockins' Stables. 

W. C. h^lman. Owner. 

Terms $4.0 for the Season. Pasture tS.OO per month. 



Exoellent Pasturage at Reasonable Rates. No 
barbed wire. Best of care taken of Mares, in 
any manner Owners may desire. 



Bon Voyage 



Champion 2 y.o. Stallion of 1904 
Champion 3 y.o. Stallion of 1905 



.A. 



Two-year-old Record 2:15 

Three-year-old Record. . .2 :1 2J£ 
Trial In a Race 2:10% 



WINNER OF HARTFORD FUTURITY (881500) FOR 1905. 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:I22£ Is by Expedition 2:15* by Electioneer 125; dam Bon Mot by Erin 2:»4X; 
second dam Farce 2:29* by f rinceps 536: third dam Roma by Qolddust 150. For breeding, Individu- 
ality and racing qualities be is unsurpassed. 

Season of 190G at PLEAS AN TON RACE TRACK. 

where he will serve a limited number of mares. 

USUAL RETURM PRIVILEGES, or money refunded should mare 
not prove In foal. A rare chance to breed good mares to an excep- 
tionally high-class and highly bred young stallion. For further Information address 

W. A. CLARK, Owner. TEO HATES. Manager. Pleasanton, Cal. 



$50 for the Season. 



Itallion 



KENNETH C. 2:17 



, THREE ^ 
l TEAK I 

I OLD 

I RECORD ) 




Sired by McKINNEY: dam MOUNTAIN 
MAID (dam of Tom Carneal 2:08W) by 
Cresco 4908 (sire of Allle Cresco 2:13, etc ); 
next dam by Cloud. 

Will make the Season of 1906 at 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

KENNETH C. was one of the fastest of an 
exceptionally good lo' of three-year-olds that 
raoed In California in 1905. He Is a splendid 
individual, has size, style and quality, and 
the grandsons and granddaughters of McKin- 
ney throueh Kenneth C. will be equal to any 
In the land. 

Tonus j * 30 ' " r the s<a *"" 



Address 



15 for Single Service. 



S. K.|TREFRY, Pleasnnlon. 



Dp»H i iTl-i^C TahlllafAH 8td tJPe wri »e n ready for framin 
•reUlgrCCfc I dUUIdlCU Write for prices. Breeder and 
I Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



February 3, 1906J 



s 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, pROPWiroa. 



Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICE 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 447. 
Telbphonb: Black 586. 



Termi- One Year S3, Six Months SI. 75. Three Month* 91 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered 
letter addressed to F. W. Kellby, 36 Geary St., San Franclsoo, 
California. 

Communications must be aocompanted by the writer s name and 
address, not neoessarlly for publication, but as a private guar- 
antee of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, February 3, 1906 



Stallions Advertised. 



TROTTING BRED. 

BONNIE DIRECT 2:05% ■ C. L. Griffith, Pleasanton, Cal. 

BON VOYAGE 2:12% Ted Hayes, Pleasanton, Cal. 

CONSTRUCTOR 39569 James Smith, Vallejo, Cal. 

GRECO Chas. De Ryder, Pleasanton, Cal. 

IRAN ALTO 2:12% . . . .H. S. Hogoboom, Woodland, Cal. 

ISALCO H. Delaney, San Jose, Cal. 

KINNEY LOU 2:07% Budd Doble, San Jose 

KENNETH C. 2:17 S. K. Trefry, Pleasanton, Cal. 

McKINNEY 2.11% Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

MAMBRINO CHIEF JR. 11622, Thos. Smith, Vallejo, Cal. 

MENDOCINO 2:19% Palo Alto Stock Farm, Cal. 

McKENA 39460 Palo Alto Stock Farm, Cal. 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16% 

j Martin Carter, Irvington, Cal. 

NUSHAGAK 25939 C. A. Spencer, Woodland, Cal. 

PSINCE ANSEL 2:20%.. C. A. Spencer, Woodland, Cal. 
MONTEREY 2:09%... P. J. Williams, San Lorenzo, Cal. 

YOSEMITE P. J. Williams, San Lorenzo, Cal. 

R. AMBUSH 2:14%: G. W. Bonnell, Redlands, Cal. 

SIDMOOR 2:17% John Ott, Pacheco, Cal. 

STAR POINTER 1:59% 

Chas. De Ryder, Pleasanton, Cal. 

UNIMAK 40936 .. .Capt. C. H. Williams, Palo Alto, Cal. 
WAYLAND W. 2:12%.. W. C. Helman, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

ZOLOCK 2:05% H. Delaney, San Jose, Cal. 

HACKNEYS. 

GREEN'S RUFUS Baywood Stud, San Mateo, Cal. 

SQUIRE OF CHESTER. .Toghill Stud, Menlo Park, Cal. 

California Stake Payments Due in 1906. 



Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes. 

(Payments should be made to P. W. Kelley, secre- 
tary, 36 Geary street, San Francisco.) 

Stake No. 3, $6000, foals of 1903— $10 due April 1, 
1906, and starting payment of $50 on three-year-old 
trotters and $35 on three-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No. 4, $6000, foals of 1904 — $10 due March 1, 
1906, and starting payment of $35 on two-year-old 
trotters and $25 on two-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore fhje, meeting. 

Stak^No. 5, $7000, foals of 1905— $10 due February 
1, !9<kV 

Stake. No. 6, $7000, foals of 1906— $5 due May 1, 
1906, and $5 due October 1, 1906. 

Stanford Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Stanford Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— $10 due June 
1, 1906, and starting payment of $20 ten days before 
State Fair opens. 

Stanford Stake of 1907, foals of 1904— $10 due June 
1, 1906. 

Occident Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Occident Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— Starting pay- 
ment of $50 due 30 days before the race. 

o 

AN EFFORT WILL BE MADE to organize a Cali- 
fornia circuit next week. At a meeting of the execu- 
tive committee of the directors of the Breeders' As- 
sociation held Thursday of this week, Secretary 
Kelley was instructed to correspond with the man- 
agers' of the principal tracks in California to arrange 
for a conference at which a circuit of harness meet- 
ings can be arranged and dates and purses annouced. 
There is every prospect for a very prosperous year 
in California for farmers and fruit growers and a 
good circuit of harness racing should be a big suc- 
cess if properly managed. It is hoped that every 
track in the State that has held meetings in the past 
will send a representative to this meeting who will 
be auhorized to give assurance that it will be a mem- 
ber of the circuit. 

o 

FOUR BIG STAKES are advertised by the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Association to close 
April 2d. The California Stakes for 2:24 class trot- 



ters and the Pacific Slope Stakes for 2:20 class 
pacers, are renewed at $2000 each. In addition the 
Sunset Stakes of $1000 for a free for all trot, and the 
Golden Gate Stakes of $1000 for a 2:09 class pace are 
offered. This starts the ball rolling. These races 
will be held at the regular annual meeting of the 
Breeders' Association in August, the place to be an- 
nounced hereafter. 

, o 

AN EPIDEMIC OF GLANDERS which was raging 
recently among the horses of Vancouver, British 
Columbia, has been almost stamped put, but accord- 
ing to a Vancouver exchange, has spread to the in- 
terior and many valuable horses are being killed 
by the inspectors. Measures to stamp out this dread- 
ful disease should be prompt and strict to be ef- 
fective. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

ERNEST A. GAMMON, Courtland.— Lilly Stanley 
2:17% was sired by Whippleton 1883, dam Dolly Mc- 
Mann, pedigree untraced. Lilly Stanley is registered 
on page 413, vol. 8, of the American Trotting Register. 
Her daughter. Lilly S., by Direct 2:05% is registered 
on page 499, vol. 15. Mares and geldings are not 
given numbers. 



SUBSCRIBER, Phoenix, Ariz.— Prince Derby is a 
registered horse. His number is 31,828. His sire is 
Charles Derby 4907, his dam Princess (dam of Derby 
Princess 2.08%, Princess Derby 2:13%, Prince Away 
2:19% and Neva 2:27) is by Administrator 357, his 
grandam by Volunteer 55, great grandam by American 
Star 14, etc. Princess was owned by Oakwood Stock 
Farm and her foals were all bred there. We cannot 
place the mare Molly MeCarty by McKinney 2:11%. 
If you know who bred her and how old she is we may 
be able to trace her breeding for you. 



WILLIAM DUNCAN, Colusa.— Beau Monde, chest- 
nut horse, foaled 1895, is imported by De Beavior, 
dam Thundercloud by imported Thunderstorm. He 
is registered in vol. 7 of the American Stud Book. 
He ran five furlongs in 1:01%, six furlongs in 1:15, 
seven furlongs in 1:28% and was beaten a length in 
a mile in 1:43%. 



T. L. Creason, Point Richmond— Golddust 150 was 
a chestnut horse, foaled 1855 and died in 1871. He 
was by Vermont Morgan, and his dam was said to be 
by the imported Arabian Zilcaadi. He was never in 
California. McCracken's Golddust was a California 
bred horse and was by Black Hawk 767. He sired 
Artist 2:26%. Another horse called Golddust was 
owned in Contra Costa county and was sired by Emi- 
grant. 

o 

GREATEST PRICE EVER OFFERED FOR A 
HORSE. 



New York, Jan. 31.— James R. Keene has refused 
an offer of $200,000 for Sysonby. This was made by 
W. T. Robinson, the leading trainer of the English 
turf last season, who is said to represent a syndi- 
cate on the other side. Sysonby, which was bred in 
England, has a strong following over there, especially 
among the breeders who believe he should be retired 
to one of their studs. 

Mr. Keene, who turned down an offer of $100,000 
made for Sysonby last summer by John W. Gates, 
evidently believes the son of Melton-Optime will 
prove a valuable addition to his breeding establish- 
ment at Castleton. 

Trainer Robinson and C. A. Mills, a prominent 
English turf man, paid a visit last week to the Keene 
barns at Sheepshead Bay, where they inspected Sys- 
onby. Both of them declared they had never seen a 
finer specimen of the thoroughbred. They then made 
their offer of £40,000, which Sid not cause Mr. Keene 
a moment's hesitation in filing a refusal. 

THE GRAND CIRCUIT. 



The management of the meeting to be given at 
Readville, Mass., will endeavor to get along without 
pool selling at their track this year, if it should prove 
necessary, and to accomplish it have formulated a new 
plan of competition that they think will prove satis- 
factory, and it is as follows: Each day three races 
will be given, limited to three heats each, with every 
heat a race, thus following the plan at Detroit last 
season. To this end they will reduce the amount of 
fered for the big stakes, and would thus make the 
Massachusetts this season $9,000 instead of $10,000 as 
heretofore, and divided in the following manner: At 
the end of each Heat $3,000 will be distributed— the 
winner getting $2,000, the second horse $900, the 
third horse $300 and the fourth horse $100. As to the 
entrance fee, it will be made five per cent, as usual, 
for each starter, payable as follows: April 10, $40, 
when the entries close; May 10, $65; June 9. $65; 
July 10, $120, and August 8, $135. For each additional 
horse from the same stable they can be named by the 
payment of $9 on each of the dates named. In the 
settlement of the winnings there will be no deduction 
made in the amount paid, thus making the races a 
straight five per cent entrance fee. Readville Is op- 
posed to the extra five per cent, making the claim that 
under that system, and which was in use last year 
at Buffalo, that some of the money winners were 
taxed thirty-seven per cent on their winnings at that 
place. Some of the leading members of the asso- 
ciation at Readville are now convinced that in late 
years there has been considerable cheating, and there- 
fore they will make a special effort this year to stop 
It by more surveillance from the judges' stand. The 



late Grand Circuit meeting produced no results as to 
the plan of racing on that circuit, but the above 
shows the plan of the Readville people, while De- 
troit, as has been reported, will adhere to the 'three 
heats, every heat a race," as Spirit of the West stated 
last week, but with ten per cent taken from the 
money winners. It has not yet been decided whether 
the Detroit meeting will be given at the Grosst- 
Pointe track or not, but if no terms can be agreed 
upon for the use of the track, the meeting will be 
given over the track at the State Fair grounds that 
was built last season. The matter of the meeting this 
year at Cleveland is not yet fully decided upon and 
it probably will not be until it Is known what the 
Ohio Legislature does in regard to the enactment of 
a new law which is to come up for decision this ses- 
sion. It is to be hoped that Cleveland this year will 
be able to give out its program when the other mem- 
bers of the circuit announce theirs, but that city 
should also be sure that a meeting will certainly be 
given when it does so to the end that the horsemen 
may not be treated to another fiasco as last year. "Be 
sure you're right, then go ahead." If not, decide the 
question early so that Detroit may fully arrange for 
a two weeks' meeting in accordance with the two 
weeks' dates that have been assigned to her. It does 
not seem possible that the Cleveland track is to be 
closed forever, located as it is in one of the best 
trotting horse cities of the Union, and all horsemen 
are of the opinion that "wiser counsels must event- 
ually prevail." The other cities that go to make up 
the Grand Circuit are already in line as to their meet- 
ings. 

o ' 

GRANDSON OF ELECTIONEER. 



Electioneer sired two sons that beat 2:10 trotting— 
Arion 2:07% and Palo Alto 2:08%. Palp Alto was a 
great race horse, one of the sort that Senator Staiv- 
ford had in mind when he used thoroughbred blood 
to enable sons and daughters of Electioneer to sus- 
tain extreme trotting speed to the end - of the mile 
and to the end of long races. Palo Alto was out of 
Dame Winnie, a thoroughbred mare by Planet that 
produced five standard trotters. When Senator Stanr 
ford gave this stallion the name of the great fBhfl 
where he was bred, it was proof that he considered 
him about the acme of his plan of breeding. Palo 
Alto left but about fifty foals, and of these, fifteen 
had taken standard records, three are producing sires, 
and two producing daughters. The fastest of Palo 
Alto's get is Iran Alto, whose record of 2:12% was 
made in a race, and whose game racing qualities have 
often been commented upon by the horsemen of Cali- 
fornia who saw him race. Iran Alto has had very 
limited opportunities in the stud, in fact we believe 
the first regular season he ever made to public mares 
was last year when H. S. Hogoboom took him to 
Woodland and made a very successful seasort with 
him. Mr. H. will have Iran Alto in the stud again 
this year at the same place, and the son of the great 
race horse Palo Alto will be one of the most popular 
stallions in Yolo county. While his breeding on his 
sire's side is so superb, the trotting blood he gets 
through his dam is also of the richest quality. His 
dam is Elaine 2.20, who was a world's champion, and 
by Messenger Duroe out of Green Mountain Maid, 
the dam of Electioneer. Elaine has four standard per- 
formers. Iran Alto's sire and dam were both champion 
trotters and are both great producers. Iran Alto has 
sired but ten colts old enough to race. Of these four 
have records as follows: Dr. Frasse 2:12%, Thos. K. 
2:15, Vendrome 2:17 and Dr. Frasse's sister 2:25,. all 
records made at four years of age. Iran Alto's fee 
this year will be $40, which is very low considering 
the price usually asked for services of horses that 
have fast records and are producers. 

• — o 

FASTEST SON OF SIDNEY. 

* 

The fastest trotter the world has ever seen was 
sired by a son of Sidney, and the fastest trotter that 
Sidney ever produced is his son Monterey 2:09%, 
who has been seen to exhibit faster than two minute 
speed on many occasions. Monterey i« owned by the 
veteran horseman, Peter J. Williams of San Lorenzo, 
and just as sure as the horse lives, breeders will be 
willing to pay more for his services two or three years 
from now than Mr. Williams asks this year, as by that 
time a few more of Monterey's colts will be in the 
2.10 list, and then the public will want his produce. 
The very first colt of Monterey's ever raced was the 
four-year-old, Irish 2:08%, fastest of his age In 1904. 
Irish took his record at the pacing gait, but is being 
trained at the trot this season and is expected to 
trot faster than his pacing record. Monterey sired an- 
other colt that was given the name of Young Mon- 
terey and took a record of 2:21 over the slow Eureka 
track in Humboldt county. Young Monterey is only 
six years old, but has one in the list already, a three- 
year-old with a record of 2:23. Monterey is the 
youngest grandsire In the State. He is by a great sire 
and out of a great brood mare, his dam having also 
produced Montana 2:16. Mr. Williams has a very 
high class son of Monterey, called Yosemite, which 
he will train and race this year, but desires to breed 
to a half dozen mares early in the season. Yosemite 
Is out of Leap Year, an own sister to that good trotter 
Iago 2:11, well known to race goers as one of the 
gamest of trotters. These horses will stand at ■ San 
Lorenzo and at Alameda, Mr. Williams having leased 
the Sherman street stables in the latter town, where 
he has fourteen nice box stalls and will take a few 
horses to train. 

1 — o 1 

N. I. McKaughan of Anaheim has removed to Los 
Angeles, where he will turn his attention to breeding 
and training harness horses. 



4 



&hc greyer mtfc ^povi&mtxn 



[February 3, 1906 



FROM STAM B'S HOME. 



Rocklin, Cal., January 29. 1906. 

Hear Editor: 1 have been living here since last 
July and among the many things I miss are the 
visits to the office of the Breeder and Sportsman. 
As I cannot call on you here goes for a visit on paper. 

Last year was one of the lean kind to the Cali- 
fornia horsemen, but there were many experiences 
and incidents I shall not forget. Let me name a few: 

The drive Rev. Williams and I had behind Sadie 
Moore which you got wind of and wrote up. 

In 1902 Landon Hunt of Eureka showed me a 
healthy chunk of horseflesh he was breaking, which 
proved to be our famous Bolivar 2:06%. 

Ben Davis invited myself and family out to the 
old San Bernardino track to see his colt Zolock move 
In 1898 and as he came down the stretch my wife 
said: "An engine!" I expected much from him but 
did not expect him to serve 75 mares and take a 
mark of 2:05% the same year. Had he been kept 
out of the stud and been tested upon a fast track my 
impression is his mark would have been a few seconds 
lower. 

I shall always remember with pleasure the trips 
from Oakland to Pleasanton on workout days when 
Judge Green, whose face was a benediction, would 
give me descriptions of sires and dam and contests 
as we returned after a feast of fat things, before 
the famous ones went East. It makes us all sad to 
think that we shall meet that princely gentleman 
here no more. 

A special visit to San Jose to see Lou Dillon gave 
me great satisfaction, because of the courtesy of that 
bishop of horsemen, Mr. Budd Doble, who was more 
patient than a country pastor while he exercised that 
beautiful, powerful volume of sensativeness bound in 
nerves. Imagine my feelings when he said, "Stay 
a little while. Mr. Speers, and I'll step her up a little." 
He did. That was my only chance. 

You won't expect me to forget July 21st. That day 
I took my filly for a five mile drive to protect her 
box stall. When within 100 feet of the barn a boy 
shot her with an air gun. It appeared to me that 
sixteen hind feet were trying to get on the cart seat 
at the same time. I am fat and not as active as I 
was in 1875 but I dismounted rapidly after the manner 
a young man enters a plunge tank— my pants were 
on top; there seemed a smell of sulphur, and by 
the time I rolled off myself the filly was out of sight. 
I concluded she was a greater success than I in the 
breaking business. This act lasted about 15 seconds. 
The footlights were turned on at 5:05 P. M.; at 
6:30 I had a surgeon set my broken arm; at 7 I led 
the filly to Dr. Archibald's Hospital, where she re- 
mained 46 days. (His services were high class and 
his charges very moderate.) Next day I sold the 
pieces of my cart. The entire affair was a great 
surprise to me but I suppose she is not the first 
standard bred filly that has broken the owner. 

There is a good half mile track here and a great 
many choice young horses. 

Tuttle Bros, and Mr. Delano deserve great credit 
for the interest they have aroused in the fancy 
harness horse. If every town this size (2,000) in the 
State were as much alive to this pleasure as Rocklin 
there would be less unnecessary alarm among horse- 
ment who falsely believe that the destiny of the 
harness horse depends on pool selling. 

When Stam B. cause to this town April, 1895 (I am 
told) there was only one horse within ten miles of 
the town that could trot a three-minute gait. There 
are to-day perhaps twenty horses within the town 
limits that can show from three minutes to a 2:30 
gait. 

Today about one hundred people visited the track 
while seven different horses entertained the crowd for 
about two hours. 

I have not seen more promising colts anywhere 
than are owned here, except, of course, at some of 
the horse centers, such as Pleasanton or San Jose. 

This week Tuttle Bros, will send a string of beau- 
ties to Pleasanton to Dr. Boucher, namely: Bay 
pacer Hattie T. by Stam B. 2.11%, dam Klickitat Maid 
2:18 by Altamont; bay filly Ramona by Stam B., dam 
by Albert W.; bay filly by Stam B., dam by Silver 
Bow 2:16, owned by A. J. De Ryder; bay filly by 
Mendocino, dam by Electioneer; brown filly by Men- 
docino, dam by Geo. Wilkes; black filly (3) by Mc- 
Klnney, dam by Palo Alto 2:08%, second dam by 
Arlon 2:07%; bay yearling colt by Bert Logan 2:16%, 
dam by Altamont. 

I'll name some nice prospects owned here which 
show lots of speed: 

A four-year-old pacer by Falrose, owned by Mr. 
McGlnerty; a four-year-old pacer by Suomi out ol 
Klickitat Maid, owned by Jas. Petch, that Is a very 
choice colt: a handsome four-year-old by Stam B. 
owned by Mr. Hebuck; a seven-year-old by Stam B. 
owned by Ed Coe, which trotted this track this year 
to road cart in 1:14; a three-year-old by William 
Harold 2:13% out of a mare by Direct 2:05%, that 
is a fast and handsome filly, breedy looking and a 
nice steady mover; a four-year-old stallion by Stam 
B. out of a mare by Fallis. owned by J. T. Whitney; 
a bay Stam B. five-year-old that weighs 1100 pounds 
and can road a 2:40 gait, is owned by Engineer Noble; 
■a roan mare by Black Prince, owned by J. M. 
Hackett. is a beauty in form, manners and gait. Mr. 
Hackett has refused $500 for her since I came here. 

J. Pfosi drives a bay horse that is five years old 
that looks as good as his breeding; he is by Stam 
B. out of Laurels 2 13'i. Walter Benton has a five- 
year-old son of Stam B. that is a smooth, nicely 
turned horse. Engineer Jerdeau owns a three-year- 
old Zombro that is a big gaited fellow and very prom- 
ising. 

The colt that is most talked of in Rocklin today, 
however, is a four-year-old by Stam B., dam a strong 
well made mare from Oregon, whose breeding is un- 
known. This colt is called Doc Frazier. He is owned 



by Mr. Frazier, a rancher near here, and has sur- 
prised all the horsemen, even his owner. You are 
very likely to receive a report from him again, as 
Mr. Frazier is receiving propositions from different 
places. W. J. SPEERS. 



A STALLION WITH CLASS. 



FROM NORTHERN SOLANO. 



Dixon, January 2S. 1906. 

The casual observer, be he a lover of good horse- 
flesh, will readily appreciate the fact that Dixon and 
its vicinity is becoming more and more important as 
a factor in producing good horses. Not only is this 
true in regard to drivers, but equally so as affecting 
draft stock. During the last year renewed interest 
has taken hold of the horse lovers of this section and 
the farmers as well as the light harness men have 
begun to realize that draft horses are a factor of 
Solano county farms. Last year imported Percheron 
stallions were bought in Vallejo, Suisun, Rio Vista 
and Dixon, and an imported Belgian draft stallion is 
also owned in Suisun Valley. Since then Dixon has 
added a fine coach stallion at a value upward of 
$3,000 and with this infusion of new blood Dixon and 
vicinity may easily hold its rank as one of the 
foremost horse breeding sections of the State. 

Horses, thoroughbred and standard bred, have been 
raised in Solano county, since Theo. Winters estab- 
lished his famous stud on Putah Creek. Today there 
are several noted breeding farms here. The Hoy 
breeding and training farm in this county opposite 
Winter's has Bayswater Wilkes at the head of the 
stud. The Suisun Stock Farm in the Potrero Hills 
has for its premier stallion Demonio 2:11%, a full 
brother to Diablo 2:09%. At the Dixon track Mr. 
Lou Mativia has the good horse Alton by Altamont. 

On visiting the fine stock farm of Mr. Delmar 
Dudley, commencing at the limits of Dixon and ex- 
tending several miles north we find an ideal estab- 
listment consisting of 1000 acres of the finest land 
in the county. 

Mr. Dudley takes great pride in showing visitors 
his stock and well might he be for who can beat such 
promising ones as are quartered here. McFadyen, 
the game colt that paced in 2:15% last summer when 
he won the two-year-old division of the Breeders' 
Futurity at Santa Rosa, and proved the fastest colt 
of his age of the year, will be at the head of Mr. 
Dudley's breeding farm. At present he is being 
jogged by Sam Hoy at his track at Winters. 

Der Teufel is now a three-year-old and was worked 
a mile by Fred Chadbourne at Pleasanton on the 
15th of June last as a two-year-old in 2.27. Mr. 
Dudley is jogging him on the road at present and 
expects to put him in the stud by the first of Febru- 
ary. Another very promising one is Truth, a two- 
year-old by Searchlight, dam Bee by Sterling. She 
is entered in the Western Horseman Stake as a three- 
year-old. A two-year-old chestnut colt by Diablo, 
dam Babe by Dawnlight, entered in the Breeders' 
Futurity and the Western Horseman, is also a fine 
prospect. 

Lookout, a brown yearling by Searchlight, dam Bee, 
is another one of great promise, and entered in the 
Breeders' Futurity for next year. 

Mr. Dudley just traded a nice yearling by Demonio 
out of Babe to Dr. J. H. Haile of Dixon for a fine 
bred Bradtmoor mare which he has added to the list 
of brood marcs on his farm. 

Entered in the Stanford Stake is Palite. by Nut- 
wood Wilkes, dam Palita by Palo Alto, second dam 
Elsie by Gen. Benton, third dam Elaine, fourth dam 
Green Mountain Maid, dam of Electioneer. This colt 
was worked a little last year and showed very fast. 

Paprika, is still another good one; she is a chestnut 
mare by Ora Belmont 2:15%, dam Auntie by Dawn. 
The dam of this mare is dam of the sire of Mamie 
R., recently sold last year by Mannie Reams to Mr. 
Butler of New York. 

Ima Jones is a fine four-year-old bay filly by Cap- 
tain Jones out of Babe. She is a good solid color, 
has much style and quality. 

The brown filly Friskarina 2:13% won second 
money in the first Breeders' Futurity and first money 
in the three-year-old division. 

Lorna Doone is a brown filly, full sister to Frisk- 
arina. and worked a trial mile in 2:18. 

Still another good one is Miss Valentine, a full 
sister to Friskarina and Lorna Doon. She is a four- 
year-old and a big fine mare of marvelous strength, 
good bone and plenty of quality, but has never been 
worked for speed. 

To conclude this list of promising horses without 
mentioning the grand old mares Babe and Bee, aged 
respectively twelve and twenty years, would be gross 
negligence on the part of any writer. They are both 
with foal to Palite. M. 

o 

A correspondent at Visalia writes: The proposed 
new race track for Exeter is now assured. This after- 
noon articles of incorporation of the Exeter Stock 
Breeders' Association were filed, under which name 
the company has been formed with the principal place 
of business at Exeter. The directors are L. F. Brown, 
George W. Kirkman, C. E. Mackey. T. M. Dungan. 
and C. F. Balaam. The company is capitalized for 
$10,000, of which $1550 has been actually subscribed. 
A forty-acre piece southwest nf Exeter has been se- 
cured, on which a regulation half mile track will be 
constructed and all the necessary buildings constitut- 
ing a fair grounds, including pavilion, grand stand, 
exhibition sheds, etc.. will be erected. 

• — o 

Mr. T. L. Davidson. Jr.. writes from Salem, Oregon, 
that owing to the fact that he has all the mares 
hooked to Hal D. that he wishes to breed this year, 
he cannot bring this son of Brown Hal to California 
as he intended. He states that he will be with us 
next year sure, however. 



One of the best posted horsemen in California a 
gentleman who bred one of the best stake winners 
of last year, remarked to the writer recently "There 
is no doubt in my mind but Martin Carter's horse 
Nutwood Wilkes is at the present time the highest 
class troting bred stallion in California.". And if any 
one will look over the list of stallions standing rtr 
service and take into consideration breeding Indi- 
viduality, rac.ng qualities and success in the , 

wood w^° babIy C ° me 10 ,he Same inclusion S£ 
wood WUkes ,s so well known to all the readers of 
his journal that the mere announcement that he wM 

Farm h V ^ W ye " 3t ****** St«k 

farm at the usual fee of $50 is sufficient, but In this 

r a ne f c e w n f ;ct e s desire to cau the attention ° f 

Nutwood Wilkes is by Guy Wilkes 2:15% son of 
Geo Wilkes 2:22. His dam is Lida W. 2 isT by 
Nutwood 2:18%, greatest sire of brood mares that 
ever lived. Lida W. is herself a member of the Grea 
Brood Mare Table. The second dam of Nutwood 
W.Ikes is Belle by Geo. M. Patchen. Jr. *l£2 
blood has gn-en pure trotting gait and great staying 
powers to a very large number of California bred 
horses. The third dam of Nutwood Wilkes was Rebel 
Daugh er, winner^ many running races, and she was 
by W ill.amson s Belmont, the best thoroughbred strain 
ever mtroduced into the trotting strains of this co^rst. 
So much for his breeding. 

As an individual he cannot be surpassed. He is 
smooth, round, with lofty Tarriage, fine head and 
neck, good feet and legs and with great vigor 
.J**.* sire . 5* has th e distinction of siring the fastest 
trotting stallion of all the Wilkes tribe-John A 
McKerron 2:04%. In addition to this, however he 
has ten in the 2:15 list, six of which have records 
below 2:11. The get of Nutwood Wilkes have the 
racing instinct, and they seem to know the game as 
soon as they are broke to harness. They come to 
their speed early and stay with it late in life and 
have excellent road as well as track qualities The 
largest winner in California last year was North 
Star 2:13%, as a three-year-old, winner of the 
Breeders' Futurity, Occident and Stanford Trotting 
Stakes. The fastest three-year-old pacing filly on 
the California circuit last year was Mona Wilkes 
2:11%, who was out of a daughter of Nutwood 
Wilkes. 

The sons and daughters of Nutwood Wilkes breed 
on. He has two sons that have sired horses with 
records below 2:10 and five daughters that have pro- 
duced horses with record below 2.15. 

Those breeding good mares to Nutwood Wilkes can 
depend on getting foals that will have good looks, 
good size, excellent feet and legs, speed, gameness 
and race horse qualities. If the foal is a colt and is 
kept for a stallion he will be certain to produce 
speed. If it is a filly she will do the same. What 
more could one ask for the money. 



STRATHWAY FOR SALE. 



As Mr. Graham E. Babcock of San Diego is sell- 
ing all his trotting bped horses and retiring from 
breeding he advertises his good producing stallion 
Strathway 2:19 for sale. Strathway is not a young 
horse, but he is one of the most vigorous and best 
preserved stallions ih California and during the past 
two years (the first time he has had good opportu- 
nities in the stud) he has not had a mare fail to 
get in foal. Strathway was a very fast horse 
himself and comes from speedy families on both 
sides, his sire being Steinway and his dam CGuntess. 
the dam of Dawn 2:18% by Whipple's Hambftlbnian. 
Strathway with the most limited opportunities has 
sired no less than seven with records better thsrvi 2:15, 
among them John Caldwell 2:08%, Toggles' *J:08%, 
two of the best gaited trotters ever hooked to a 
sulky. Strathway also sired Homeward 2.13. sire 
of the sensational trotter George G., that sold for 
$15,000 and took a record of 2:05%. Stoneway. an- 
other son of Strathway. is producing great speed, a 
two-year-old taking a record last season of 2:15%, 
and a three-year-old one of 2:15%. Strathw-ay's 
get are all good gaited and come to their speed nat- 
urally and quickly. He will be a good investment 
for some one. Write to his owner for price asked 
and full particulars. 

o 

BON VOYAGE IS AT PLEASANTON. 



J. O. Gerrity, who trained the horses owned by Mr- 
W. A. Clark, Jr., last year, and is now located at 
Los Angeles with them, shipped the famous young 
stallion Bon Voyage 2:12% to Ted Hayes at Pleas- 
anton this week, and the fastest three-year-old trot- 
ting colt of 1905 will be in the stud at Pleasanton this 
season under Mr. Hayes' care. Bon Voyage is a 
grand individual and one of the best bred ones in 
America. He should be a great horse to breed mares 
of the Wilkes blood to. as he is by Expedition 2:15%, 
one of Electioneer's greatest sons. The cross of 
Electioneer and Wilkes blood is proving such a 
great success, and there being so many high -class 
mares of the Wilkes strain in California, great results 
should certainly follow the bringing of such a high- 
class young stallion to this State by Mr. Clark. Bon 
Voyage was a great stake winner as a two-year-old 
and took a record of 2:15 that year In a winning race, 
and reduced it to 2:12% in a winning race last season 
as a three-year-old. being the champion trotter of 
his age and sex both years. Mr. Clark has a small 
collection of high-class brood mares at Pleasanton, 
most of which will be bred to this splendid son of 
Expedition. 

I — o 

The saddle stallion Star McDonald by Rex McDon- 
ald recently c hanged hands in Kentucky, the consider- 
ation being $2500. 



February , 1906] 



THOB JGHBRED DEPARTMENT. 



t 



By Ralph H. Tozer.) 
The Burns jTandicap, the far West's most impor- 
tant stake race, was won in hollow fashion by Dr. 
Leggo last Saturday, the Puryear D. horse carrying 
114 pounds in track record time, 2:05%. Red Leaf 
(100 pounds) was second, two and one-half lengths 
away, and a neck before the favorite, Proper (122 
pounds). Sir Brillar set the pace for over a mile, 
closely attended by Red Leaf. Prior kept Leggo 
close up, and making the last turn was third. When 
he set the Doctor down he ran past the leaders as if 
they were tied and won in a big gallop. The winner 
could have gone the route iti about 2:04% if it had 
been necessary. Owner C. C. McCafferty is certainly 
a fox. Through the defeat of Dr. Leggo by mediocre 
performers at Ascot Park, Handkapper Egbert was 
fooled into allotting but 114 pounds to the horse, 
when the race proved he could have won with 125 
pounds. The lesson taught is that a horse should 
be handicapped on his very best performance, unless 
the galloper shows by a long series of bad races that 
it has gone away back, and an owner who schemes 
to "get weight off," In short, practices fraud, should 
be punished severely. The Ascot performances of Dr. 
Leggo were "bogus," in the opinion of nearly every 
one, and it is not too late for the Los Angeles officials 
to take action in the matter, if the Emeryville .stew- 
ards do not believe they have jurisdiction, for bolh 
associations are working under the same. rule's ami are 
members of the Pacific Jockey Club. 

• * * 

But forgetting the ante-post features of Dr. Leggo's 
running, he is a grand race horse, and as I wrote in 
these columns nearly a year ago, is the best colt pro- 
duced in California in many years, if, indeed, his 
equal was ever foaled within the borders of the 
Golden State. It must be a pleasant matter for A. B. 
Spreckels to contemplate — that within the first ten 
years of his breeding operations he should send from 
his Napa Stock Farm to do turf battle the champion 
race horse of his day, as far as the middle and far 
West is concerned — and I am not at all sure that Dr. 
Leggo would be very badly beaten by Sysonby should 
the pair meet on equal terms at a mile and a quarter 
just at this moment. I have seen both race, and both 
generally win their races easily. Sysonby goes out 
in front, Dr. Leggo comes from behind. Both are' 
plain-looking bay horses, Sysonby the larger of the 
duo, and a darker bay. No performance of Sysonby 
in 1905, considering the "fastness" of the various 
tracks, excels Dr. Leggo's Emeryville race very much, 
and if you want to hark back to Leggo's races of ten 
and eleven months ago they would not suffer by com- 
parison. It might not be amiss to give the best per- 
formances of each, from a time and weight stand- 
point, so that they can be compared: 

Sysonby. Dr. Leg-go. 

2% miles in 3:54, 115 lbs., 3 miles in 5:22 (.beaten 
galloping, Coney Island, about half a length), S5 
Sept. 2. Track record, lbs., Emeryville, April 
3:53 3-5. 8. World's record. 5:22. 

1% miles in 2:33 1-5, 126 1 3-16 miles in 1:59%." 108 
lbs., 3-year-olds, gallop- lbs., easily, Emeryville, 
ing, Brighton Beach, April 5. Track record 
July 29. Track record, 1:59%. 
2:32 1-5. 1% miles in 2:05%, 115 

1% miles in 2:06 2-5, 126 lbs., galloping, Emery- 
lbs.. 3-year-olds, easily, . ville, January 27, 1906. 
Brighton Beach. July 20. Track record, 2:05%. 
Track record, 2:04 4-5. 1 mile and 50 yards in 
1% miles in 2:47, 126 lbs., 1:42%, 110 lbs.,, easily, 
3-year-olds, galloping, Emeryville, April 12. 
Coney Island, July 4. Track record. 1:42. 
Track record, 2:47. (?) About 1% miles in 2:03%, 
1% miles in 2.07. Ill lbs., 122 lbs., easily, Lps An- 
easily, Coney Island. geles, Feb. 18, track 
July 1. Track record, slow. Track record, 
2:04 3-5. ' ' 2.02%. i 

1% .miles in 2:05, 126 lbs., 1 mile in 1:39, 103 lbs., 
3-year-olds, easily, Con- handily, Emeryville, 
ey Island, July 17. February 25. Then track 
Track record. 2:04 3-5. record, 1:39. 

Sysonby (111 pounds) beat Proper (114 pounds) 
by .four lengths, easily, in the Commonwealth, at 
Coney Island, mile and a quarter, July 1, 1905, time 
2:07, but Proper later on ran faster than this, as did 
Sysonby, so that it is hardly a test race. Judging r>y 
the above records, Sysonby is perhaps a six-pound 
better horse than Dr. Leggo, but not a bit better, if, 
indeed, that much superior to the Californian. Much 
better care has been taken of Sysonby, too. He was 
not raced at three miles as a three-year-old in the 
month of April, as was Dr. Leggo, neither was the 
Melton colt sent along a mile in 1:39 in a race as 
early as February, or a mile and fifty yards and a 
mile and three-sixteenths in fast time in April. Had 
the Napa colt been handled as carefully as was Sys- 
onby there would have been some question as to 
which was the superior racer, and I am not so sure 
that the verdict would have been In favor of the Eng- 
lish racer. Dr. Leggo is a racing marvel, and con- 
sidering his treatment, as much of a phenomenon as 
is Sysonby. 

The breeding of Dr. Leggo is upon the lines that I 
have been talking of for a long time past — unbroken 
links of success on both sides of the house. Puryear 
D., his sire, was not a great race horse, but he Is 
a success at the stud, as was Deceiver, his sire, then 
Wenlock, Lord Clifden, Newminster, Touchstone and 
down to the unbeaten Eclipse. On the dam's side of 
Dr. Leggo's house I find Sevens, a stake winner by 
the great sire, Imp. Watercress, then Folly (sister 
to the great race horse Sinfax, a winner herself and 
a dam of several good winners), then Folly was from 
a stake winner that threw stake winners, and thus 
the pedigree continues on the mother's side — the first 
six or seven dams by tried sires and themselves 
mothers of stake horses. It only emphasizes the truth 
of the old saying, "Nothing succeeds like success." 
Breed to good sires with no breaks In the success 
chain and If on the mother's side the first five or six 
dams have produced stake-winners, as In the case 
of Dr. Leggo, you are quite likely to breed horses of 
the stamp of the California champion and one of the 
most remarkable racers that ever saw the light. 



Manager Brooks and Starter Holtman are at log- 
gerheads at Ascot, and it was over the question of 
an assistant starter's right to hold or not to hold 
a horse at the post. I applaud Manager Brooks' stand 
in the matter and believe, with him, that if assistants 
are allowed to hold horses as their own sweet will 
dictates it will kill off all the popularity racing pos- 
sesses in shorter order than anything that could be 
devised. If a starter were unscrupulous and wanted 
to get rick quick all he would need to do would be 
to give orders to hold every well-played horse in a 
race until those not well-played were on their way 
fifty or 100 yards. A starter with this power and no 
one to say, "Hold, enough of this holding," could beat 
Sysonby or Dr. Leggo with Swagger or Bearskin. It 
is high time the governing turf body took a hand in 
the game and forbade the holding of any horse at the 
post under penalty of a heavy fine or loss of position 
for the "assistant bookmaker," or "hold-on Jimmy." 
I have not observed that Dick Dwyer's assistants 
have to take horses by the head as did Holtman's — 
no, not one-twentieth part as much. 

• * • 

To dissolve a partnership, the following horses in 
W. M. Murry's hands will be sold to-day in the pad- 
dock at Emeryville: St. Francis, Mazel, Bakersfield, 
Marie H, Edelweiss and a chestnut four-year-old 
gelding by imp. Prestonpans-Queen Kapiolani. 

POLO AND PONY RACING AT CORONADO. 



GOOD BLOOD AT LOW FEES. 



Preparations are being made for the entertainment 
of the crowds that are expected at Coronado for the 
polo tournament to be held March 3 and 5, when the 
Mackay team from England will compete with local 
teams for the Spreckels challenge cup. 

The meeting will be held under the direction of 
the Southern California Polo and Racing Association. 
All ponies will be raced under the rules of the asso- 
ciation, entries must be in before February 19, and 
only ponies of three years old and upward and not 
exceeding 14.2 in height will be admitted to the vari- 
ous events. The program for the two days' racing is: 
First Day. 

Selling pony race, one-half mile, $50. 

Galloway race, gentlemen riders only, five-eighths 
mile, $75. 

Polo pony race, gentlemen riders only, three-six- 
teenths mile, cup valued at $80. 

The Spreckels challenge cup, to be won three times 
by same owner, owner of winner on each occasion 
to receive m a duplicate of cup in miniature. Gentle- 
men riders only, one and one-half miles. 

Race for horses, three-quarters mile, $75. 

Pony hurdle race, one mile over six hurdles, three 
feet timber, six inches brush, cup, $50. 

Second Day. 

Polo pony race, gentlemen riders only, three-eighths 
mile, cup $50. 

Horse race, for horses owned in San Diego county, 
half mile and repeat, $50. 

Breeders' stakes, for ponies, three-year-olds and 
under, weight for inches; subscription of $15, second 
to save stake, three-eighths mile, cup added $50. 

Horse race, weight for age scaling down from top 
weight, one mile, $75. 

Pony race, gentlemen riders only, three-quarters 
mile, cup $600. 

Pony race for ponies, gentlemen riders only, one- 
quarter mile, cup $50. 



NUSHAGAK AND PRINCE ANSEL. 

Woodland Stock Farm presents Its advertisement 
this week of those two excellent stallions, Nushagak 
and Prince Ansel. 

The first named has already sired a trotter that Is 
known all over the country — Aristo, winner of the 
Occident Stake and Stanford Stakes of 1902, and 
earner of a race record of 2:08% the following year 
at the New York meeting of the Grand Circuit. There 
is quite a bunch of colts and fillies by Nushagak now 
in training at Woodland Stock Farm track that will 
still further add to Nushagak's reputation as a sire 
of fast trotters that have size and good looks. Nush- 
agak is a royally bred stallion. His sire is Sable 
Wilkes, whose three-year-old record was 2:18, and his 
dam is the great brood mare Fidelia by Director 2:17, 
founder of one of the greatest racing families ever 
known to the harness racing turf. The second dam 
of Nushagak was by Reavis Blackbird, and the third 
dam by McCracken's Blackhawk. Nushagak will 
make the season at a fee of $50. 

Prince Ansel, two-year-old record 2:20%, Is a son 
of Dexter Prince and the great brood mare Wood- 
flower by Electioneer. He was one of the greatest 
two-year-old trotters ever produced on the coast, and 
but for an accident would have had a much lower 
record. He has the distinction of having beaten that 
great trotter John A. McKerron In his two-year-old 
form. The Dexter Prince-Electioneer cross proved a 
speedy one at Palo Alto Farm, and Prince Ansel Is 
one of its best representatives. He Is a very fine 
individual and his colts are showing great speed. 
His fee will be $30, which Is certainly a bargain in 
stallion fees. 



DISTEMPER PREVALENT. 

There Is a great deal of distemper about Just now In 
some sections of the country. More than usual at this 
time of the year, and the cause Is perhaps to be found 
in the damp, wet weather which prevailed In most parts 
of the country during the summer and fall. This damp 
unfavorable weather predisposes horses and colts to 
lung and throat troubles, and there is always a greater 
likelihood of distemper Innoculatlng animals when suf- 
fering from a cold or chill. It will be useful for every 
horse owner to have on hand In readiness a bottle of 
Craft's Distemper and Cough Cure and give an occa- 
sional dose to prevent the possibility of any infectious 
disease, such as distemper, pinkeye, Influenza, epizootic, 
catarrhal or shipping fever taking hold of your stock. 
It Is Just as effectual for sheep and dogs as for horses. 
It Is made by the Wells Medicine Co., 13 Third St.. 
Lafayette, Ind., and is sold by druggists generally, or 
will be sent direct prepaid on receipt of price, 50c and 
$1.00. 



The veteran horseman Thos. S rri£h of Vallejo; has 
two stallions in the stud at that town this .war whose 
services have been put so low that they are within 
the reach of every breeder. We do not remember of 
ever hearing of such richly bred stallions standing 
for such low fees anywhere on this coast. 

The services of the registered horse Gen. J. B. Frls- 
bie, No. 41637, are offered for $25 for the season. 
This horse is a full brother to that handsome and 
fast trotter Tom Smith 2:13% and Is one of the most 
perfect models of a trotting stallion. He is good gaited 
and fast. His sire is McKinney 2:11%, his dam the 
great brood mare Daisy S., dam of four in the list 
by McDonald Chief 3583, second dam Fanny Rose, 
dam of Geo. Washington 2:16%, Columbus 2:17, etc., 
by Ethan Allen Jr. 2903. The McKinney, Clark Chief 
and Morgan crosses can be expected to produce 
handsome horses when united, and It has been real- 
ized in Gen. J. B. Frisbie, certainly one of the hand- 
somest stallions In California. 

The other stallion which Mr. Smith advertises is 
Mambrlno Chief Jr. 11622, the sire of Dollican 2:15%. 
Geo. "Washington 2:16%, and many others. This horse 
is by McDonald Chief 3583, out of Venus by Main- 
brino Patchen. Mambrlno Chief Jr. Is a uniform sire 
of large handsome horses of solid color and with the 
best of feet and legs. His get have generally been 
owned by persons who have not trained them, yet he 
has quite a respectable list of standard performers, 
and has sons and daughters that are producers. • His 
service fee will be but $20 for the season. Look over 
the advertisement of these two stallions. 



PALO ALTO STALLIONS AT STUD. 

The advertisement of Mendocino and McKena, the 
only two stallions remaining at Palo Alto Stock Farm 
appears in our issue this week. 

Mendocino, whose record of 2:19% was made when 
he was three years old, is a son of Electioneer, and 
a well-bred one, as his dam is the great brood mare 
Mano by Piedmont. Mendocino is most powerfully 
muscled and a grandly proportioned horse whose 
reputation as a sire of game race winners is estab- 
lished. He has sired Monte Carlo 2:07%, Idolita 
2:09%, Leonora 2:12%, Polka Dot 2:14% and many 
others with fast records. Mendocino carries the 
blood of Electioneer, Piedmont and Whipples Ham- 
bletonian backed up by the strong thoroughbred strain 
of imported Mango. His service fee this year will 
be $75. 

McKena 39460 is a son of McKinney 2:11%, that is 
out of that great race mare Helena 2:11%, dam of 
three in the list, by Electioneer, second dam Lady 
Ellen, dam of six in the list, by Carr's Mambrino, 
third dam by Owen Dale and fourth dam by William- 
son's Belmont. McKena is a magnificent large horse, 
weighing over 1300 pounds and finely formed. He was 
injured as a colt and could not be trained, but he 
is one of the surest of foal getters and one of the 
best bred McKinneys living. At a service fee of 
$35 he is one of the best horses to breed to in Cali- 
fornia. Read the advertisement of these two stallions 
in this issue. 



KINGS COUNTY FAIR. 

Down at the little town of Hanford, Kings county, 
where the Central California Fair is held every year, 
there is only a half mile track, but the progressive 
managers succeed in giving the best county fair held 
in the State. They took in nearly $6000 in gate re- 
ceipts during six days last fall, which shows that the 
people of that section turn out better than they do 
elsewhere. While a good program of racing is given, 
the managers make a special endeavor to have a 
fine stock show each year, and the exhibits of dairy 
and beef breeds, and of sheep, hogs and draft horses 
is large and meritorious. The association has recently 
prepared a financial statement from the secretary's 
books which is as follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

Advertising $ 62.70 

Concession 1770.52 

Gate receipts 5966.90 

Exhibition space 25.00 

Entrance fee 165.00 

Lease ground, Co. 1 100.00 

Rent, wood, straw 47.35 

County donation 1000. 00 

Total $9137.47 

PAID OUT. 

Taxes, two years ...$ 156.82 

Insurance 142 80 

Rent of office 27.00 

Account of 1904 965.76 

Improvements 669.06 

Labor 829.50 

Labor, clerical 424.40 

Expense 1530.43 

Premiums 1165.90 

Races 2344.30 

Band 536.50 

Acrobats 200.00 

Directors' expense 144.00 

Total $9136.47 

O : 

"ANOTHER SPAVIN CURE." 

Mr. John W. Sanner of Decatur. III., writes as fol- 
lows: "I have used QUINN'S OINTMENT to remove 
splints and reduce soreness In spavins with very satis- 
factory results. Recently I advised a friend owning a 
horse with a had spavin to use QUINN'S OINTMKNT. 
and he informed me that the horse Is going sound: 
this result being produced in two weeks, the horse 
being used dally on paved streets." This is the gen- 
eral expression of leading horsemen all over the coun- 
try who have given QUINN'S OINTMENT a trial. For 
curbs, splints, spavins, wlndpuffs and all bunches there 
Is nothing better. Price one dollar per bottle. Ad- 
dress W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y., if you can- 
not obtain from druggist. 



6 



[.February 3, 1906 



JOTTINGS. 

"Miarque," the Horse Review's representative who 
goes 'through the Grand Circuit every year and writes 
th4 accounts of the races for that journal, says: 

"I saw many mistakes made last season in placing 
horses as they finished, both on the Grand Circuit and 
the Great Western. Some of these errors were so 
glaring »« to be inexcusable, even at a county fair, 
where the officials are not always guaranteed adepts. 
On four *»r five successive occasions on the 'big ring' 
serious errors were made when there was no possible 
excuse. For Instance: At Oakley Park, Brownie 
Wilton beat Norrie by a margin of four feet in the 
final heat of a race. The judges, to the consternation 
of the crowd, gave the heat to Norrie. 

In the two-year-old division of the Review Futurity, 
at the same meeting, four horses were misplaced in 
the first heat, although they were widely separated. 
In this instance the error caused fourth money, $300, 
to be given to the wrong horse. 

At Decatur, 111., last August, a horse heavily backed 
to come second won the place handily, but another 
horse away back in the rear ranks was awarded it. 
The "books" paid according to the decision of the 
Judges, who afterwards placed the horses correctly. 
There was a howl went up from those who had 
played the originally misplaced horse to place, and 
the secretary had to cash the tickets. 

No less than five horses were misplaced at Gales- 
burg, 111., in a single heat. 

Only rank carelessness' on the part of the judges 
could make such unpardonable mistakes possible. 
In case of a really close heat no one can afford to 
gainsay their judgment, and no one does, excepting 
the ones' who hold losing tickets." 

When such errors occur at the average country 
meeting there is not much surprise manifested among 
horsemen, a good strong kick being generally regis- 
tered by the losers and a lot of loud talk indulged in 
for an hour or two, and then the races go on as 
usual, but for Grand Circuit judges to make such 
mistakes as those mentioned by Marque is inexcus- 
able. I remember acting as clerk at a meeting once 
where three "prominent citizens" were the judges. 
A purse of $1000 was being trotted for and there were 
six horses in the race. Just at the finish of a heat 
a little "disturbance" started in the crowd just back 
of the judges' stand and not one of the three judges 
saw the finish of the race. It was one of my duties 
to take down the numbers of the horses as they 
crossed the wire, and as they were called by one of the 
judges, and as from my position in the stand I could 
not see the scrap, my attention was directed to this 
race and I got the numbers of the horses as they fin- 
ished. The presiding judge took my "call" as cor- 
rect and with his usual dignity announced the result. 
I have often wondered who these judges would have 
called on for the necessary information as to the 
places earned by each horse in that heat, had the 
"little unpleasantness" been within the line of my 
vision. They might have done as the judges at a lit- 
tle country fair in this State once did. On this oc- 
casion the drivers wore no arm numbers and the 
judges were all looking at the nose and nose finish 
of the two leaders and forgot all about the other five 
in the race. They were in a quandary for a few min- 
utes as to what to do, when a happy idea struck one 
of them. The five drivers were called into the stand 
and questioned as to the possibility of a little foul 
driving in the stretch. Tht first question asked each 

one was. "Mr. , where did you finish?" The 

clerk took the claimed figure down, and when all were 
interrogated it was found that there was no contest — 
all had claimed different positions and the summary 
was made up without even the suspicion that the 
"prominent citizens" had not placed their eagle eyes 
on every man in the race. To this day those drivers 
probably believe that there was something doing by 
some one of them in the way of foul driving in that 
heat, but which one they have never been able to 
ascertain. 

o 

RECORD STALLIONS AND MARES. 



Stallions that have been trained and have made 
fast records will have the preference among breeders 
in the future. They will be more liberally patronized 
and receive a better class of mares than will those 
stallions which have not been trained or those that 
have been trained but have failed to take records. 
This is as it should be, for the fact that a horse has 
taken a fast record Is positive proof that he has in- 
herited and possesses all the qualities essential for 
speed. The horse that possesses all the elements of 
speed is sure to be more successful as a sire of speed 
than one which is lacking in any of these important 
qualities upon which speed depends. 

If a horse has inherited and does possess all these 
qualities essential to speed, however, he will surely 
transmit those- qualities, whether his speed Is de- 
veloped or not. Patronage had no record and yet 
when but seven years old he got the world's cham- 
pion trotter, Allx 2:03%. The sire of Patronage was 
Pancoast 2:21%, but Pancoast was only two years 
old and consequently had not been trained for speed 
when he got Patronage. Several sons of Pancoast 
took fast records, but none of them has ever sired a 
Irotter that has taken so fast a record as that of 
Mix 2:03%. 

Three entire sons of Baron Wilkes 2.18 have made 
records -below 2:10. They are Baron Bell 2:09, Oak- 
land Baron 2:09%, and Baron Rogers 2:09%. The 
fastest trotter by the records got by any son of Baron 
Wilkes is Fereno 2:05%. Moko, the sire of Fereno, 
has no record and was only three years old when he 
got Fereno. Sidney Dillon had no record yet when 
he was only two years old he got Dolly Dillon 2:06%, 
and was but five years old when he got the world's 
champion trotter Lou Dillon 1:58%. 



Fanella 2:13 was not trained for speed until after 
she had produced the sensational young trotter Todd 
2:14% (that trotted eighths in 15 seconds as a two- 
year-old) and the lamented Sadie Mac 2:06%), the 
most sensational trotter out last season. The rich 
speed inheritance that she derived from her ancestors 
enabled her to transmit extreme speed ability to her 
offspring before her speed was developd. 

Th dam of Alix 2.03% had a remarkably strong 
speed inheritance but had no record, yet Alix was 
not only a world's champion trotting record breaker 
in her day, but also holds the honor of winning the 
fastest nine-heat race ever trotted. Mabel, the dam 
of Cresceus 2:02%, had no record but she produced 
one of the most remarkable trotters ever foaled, the 
winner of an eight-heat race as a three-year-old 
against aged horses. After losing the first five heats 
he won the last three in 2:12%, 2:11%, 2:11%. Few 
three-year-old trotters could ever recover from the 
effects of such a race as that, yet Cresceus did not 
seem to mind it, and finally became the world's cham- 
pion trotter with a record of 2:02%, without the as- 
sistance of a runner pulling a dirt shield in front to 
lessen atmospheric resistance. 

No horse that has held the world's champion trot- 
ting stallion record has yet sired a world's champion 
trotter, hence although it is advisable for stallion 
owners to develop the speed of their horses and prove 
by giving them fast records that they do possess speed 
ability, such development is not essential to a stal- 
lion in order to insure his success as a sire of ex- 
treme speed. The success of a stallion as a sire or a 
mare as a producer undoubtedly depends upon his or 
her speed inheritance rather than development. If the 
inheritance be there with no undesirable element to 
antagonize it, success is sure to follow under favor- 
able conditions. Without an inheritance of the right 
sort, years of development will not enable a stallion 
to become a successful sire or a mare a successful 
producer of speed. 

o- — ■ ■ 

SIGNS OF A DOCILE HORSE. 



F. M. Ware in Outing gives various suggestions to 
the man who would buy a good horse, and among 
them the following. 

Once out of the stall, notice that he submits quietly 
to being wiped over, and betrays no resentment, while 
harnessing, at accepting the bit, bridle, crupper, etc., 
etc., and decorously permitting all necessary altera- 
tions and attentions. Accept no departure from ab- 
solute docility of deportment; for be sure that if the 
animal betrays either excitability, nervousness, or 
vice in the dealer's hands, he will be far worse with 
you, for you know you don't know ,and he will know 
you don't know — and those combinations spell trou- 
ble. In the same way, see him led out and put to 
the vehicle to which he is to be driven, noting each 
stage of the process, viewing him always with the 
icily critical eye of the individual who does not (yet) 
own him. Excuse nothing, and make no allowances 
for less. If he makes a move you don't fancy, say so 
frankly and look further— there are plenty of horses. 
o 

Mr. D. J. Desmond of Los Angeles is spending a 
good portion of his time in San Francisco just now, 
as the firm of which he is a member has the contract 
for building the bridges on the new Ocean Shore 
Railway now building from San Francisco to Santa 
Cruz. Mr. Desmond is an ardent horseman, and an 
enthusiastic road driver. In company with Mr. S. 
Christianson of this city he took several spins over 
our park roads and ocean drives last week, and has 
consequently decided to keep one or two of his horses 
here while his contracts are under way. Mr. Desmond 
formerly owned that whirlwind pacer by Titus out 
of Lady Waldstein that is the sensation of the Los 
Angeles track and that recently stepped a mile in 
2:07. 



The first colt by Strathway 2:19 for 1906 made his 
appearance at Mr. Whalen's Santa Rita Ranch, near 
Pleasanton, last Monday. His dam is a fine mare by 
Athadon, out of a mare by Dexter Prince. She is 
owned by Mr. O. Scribner of the Associated Oil Com- 
pany, who is now in Europe. Mr. Whalen reports 
the colt as a fine big lusty fellow, looking like his 
sire. 



Mine Host "Scotty" Burns of the Western Hotel, 
Sacramento, is the owner of a Nutwood Wilkes filly 
that he believes will be one of the race winners of 
the future in the free-for-all class, and his friends who 
have looked the little miss over are already figuring 
on having a ticket or two on her when she is old 
enough to start. She is a handsome bay, just eight 
months old and like all the Nutwood Wilkes family 
has good legs and feet and a lot of "class." She 
is out of Ollie Dew by Waldstein, son of Director. 
Abbie Carter is the name Mr. Burns has chosen for 
this filly, and the fact that $1000 would not tempt 
him to part with her shows that he thinks pretty 
well of her. 



Dan O'Keefe, an occasional correspondent of the 
Breeder and Sportsman at W r oodland, has sold his 
horseshoeing shop at that place to his brother, and 
has gone on the road for the Capewell Horse Shoe 
Nail Company. Mr. O'Keefe's decision has been in- 
fluenced by two considerations: The position he has 
accepted is a very desirable one. Strict attention to 
business has somewhat Impaired his health and an 
opportunity to travel will undoubtedly restore it. Mr. 
O'Keefe took a course in scientific horseshoeing from 
a Philadelphia expert and has since had a high class 
of patronage. His services have been much in de- 
mand by horsemen of Yolo county, and those who 
own good roadsters. 

. — o 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



COMMON SENSE TALK ABOUT THE AUTOMO- 
BILE. 



(From the Newark Advertiser.) 

The general public throughout the entire State is 
demanding a new law to regulate the speed of all 
vehicles upon the highways. Horsemen are joining 
the road drivers' associations in all sections of the 
State, and much interest is being manifested in the 
new State organization. The general demand is for 
a just and fair law for all. Suggestions are numerous 
as to the terms of such a measure and autoists and 
horsemen alike are studying in order to agree upon 
an equitable statute. W. Gould Brokaw, a millionaire 
auto owner, in a recent interview, said: 

"There have been altogether too many people killed 
in the last six months in automobile driving and I 
believe something should be done to remedy the mat- 
ter. I am an enthusiastic automobllist myself and I 
think that all chauffeurs should pass an examination 
and be licensed before they are allowed to operate 
a car. In France, where the automobile Is in the 
highest state of perfection and great pleasure is taken 
in automobile riding and racing, every chauffeur is 
licensed and has to pass a rigid examination before 
he is permitted to take anybody out in a car. 

"We should have the same law in this country. Why 
should chauffeurs be allowed to take persons' lives in 
their hands without previously having undergone some 
kind of an examination. There should be a law passed 
similar to that under which locomotive engineers are 
examined. Their eyesight is tested. Their physical 
condition is tested, and if there is. any accident in 
which any one can be blamed, the chauffeur, like the 
engineer, should be responsible. The laws relating to 
locomotive engineers and chauffeurs should be sim- 
ilar. 

"In an accident where there is neglect on the part 
of the chauffeur he should be punished by criminal 
action. I think if such an examination were had and 
such a law passed, it would do much to lower the 
automobile accidents in this country." 

The suggestion of Mr. Brokaw would seem to be a 
good one. It comes from an auto owner, and it has 
been noticed that most all of the recent fatal acci- 
dents have been caused by the great speed at which 
the machines were being driven by the chauffeur. The 
■ability of a chaffeur and the size of his salary seems 
to be based upon the speed at which he can run his 
machine. Another suggestion is to allow no higher 
than twenty-horse power machines to be run upon the 
highways, or machines which could not attain more 
speed than twenty miles an hour, the higher power 
machines being classified as racing machines and 
allowed only on tracks or beaches where racing carni- 
vals are being given. Another suggestion is that it 
be made a State prison offense for either a driver of 
a horse or machine to be found guilty of careless 
driving upon the public highways. Twenty miles an 
hour, or a three-minute gait, it is argued. Is fast 
enough for any one to ride behind a horse or in a 
machine upon the highways of this State. 

The autoists claim that the reason why the machine 
should be allowed by law to go at a much faster pace 
than the horse, is because it can be stopped more 
quickly. Just what difference it makes after an ac- 
cident has occurred how quick the stop is made is not 
stated. But this statement is disputed. A machine 
is inanimate: a horse is almost human. The animal, 
even at runaway speed, will guide itself among ve- 
hicles, and when checked in its course is easily con- 
trolled. A machine, when the brake is suddenly ap- 
plied for a quick stop, will, in many instances, when 
going at full speed, "turn turtle" or run sideways and 
overturn. Whoever heard of a road driver killing 
cows, chickens, dogs, etc., on the road? Yet the state- 
ment is made and vouched for that a South Jersey 
farmer makes his living by picking up turkeys and 
chickens killed upon the public roads by the machines. 
Both the horse and the machine enter in the business 
life of this community. 

The horse and his owner keep thousands employed 
as coachmen, blacksmiths, harness makers, grain mer- 
chants, wagon and carriage manufacturers, stablemen, 
etc., and the machines use oil, gasoline, leather and 
machinery for the manufacture of which this city Is 
celebrated. These merchants and manufacturers are 
therefore opposed to any law which would abridge 
the use of machines. But would a law regulating the 
speed lessen the use? Would there not be Just as 
many machines, if not more, sold, if the speed was so 
controlled by law as to lessen the danger of accident, 
and should not the regulation of speed by law lessen 
the danger and increase the sale? 

Another question is that of the public health. It Is 
well known that a machine going over a dusty road 
by reason of the large tires and low body causes a 
much larger amount of dust to rise than any vehicle 
to which a horse may be attached. The inhalation of 
this dust is injurious, and the faster rate of speed at 
which the machine is being driven there is necessarily 
more dust. Machine owners admit and horsemen de- 
clare that the present law is inadequate and non-en- 
forceable. Why, therefore, cannot the two interests 
get together and agree upon such a measure as will 
satisfy each and in turn merit the commendation of 
the general public? Let there be a give and take 
spirit manifested, let personal feelings and bickerings 
be left out of the discussion and when a measure is 
drafted let it receive the support of all. 



The Gilroy race track has been plowed up and will 
be closed to the public hereafter. The owner, Mrs. 
Sargent, has heretofore permitted everybody who 
desired to drive on the track, but the privilege was 
abused, valuable fruit trees were broken down, fences 
destroyed and other depredations committed. The 
Gilroy track was particularly adapted to winter train- 
ing and its loss to the trainers of that locality will be 
a serious one. 



February 3, 1906] 



We received a very pleasant call this week from 
Mr. C. E. Veeder of the International Stock Food 
Company, whose headquarters for a few months past 
have been in Pasadena. Mr. Veeder came to Califor- 
nia partly to recuperate his health, which had be- 
come somewhat impaired by a too strict attention to 
business for many years. We are pleased to know 
that the glorious climate of this State has fully re- 
stored him to health, however, and that he Is now 
traveling about over the coast looking after the inter- 
ests of the company that makes the food that Dan 
Patch, Cresceus, Directum and Arion eat. He left 
last Monday night for a week's trip to Oregon and 
Washington, and will stop in San Francisco for a few- 
days on his return. Mr. Veeder is now the coast 
agent for the International Stock Food Company. 



The Tucson Driving Association will give a pro- 
gram of races on Washington's birthday which is ex- 
pected to furnish some fine sport. Arizona Is getting 
to be quite a horse breeding section and many good 
ones are owned there. 



Martin Carter, proprietor of the Nutwood Stock 
Farm, the home of Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, has jusi 
sold to Mr. Geo. T. Algeo, of Oakland, the trotting 
stallion T. C, three-year-old record 2.30, and trial 
of 2:20*4, which is no measure of the horse's speed. 
T. C. is one of the best bred stallions in California, 
and Mr. Algeo will place him in the stud at Oakland. 
T. C. is by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%. his dam is Zeta 
Carter by Director, and his second dam Lida W. 
2:18%, the dam of Nutwood Wilkes, etc., by Nut- 
wood. As John A. McKerron 2:04%. champion trotting 
stallion of the Wilkes tribe, is by Nutwood Wilkes 
out of a Director mare, it will be seen that T. C. is 
bred in the same lines as that great performer. This 
horse should receive a liberal patronage from the 
breeders of Alameda county, and while ha has been 
bred heretofore to but very few mares, his get are 




Bakersfield horsemen will race their horses on 
Washington's Birthday. Five or six harness events 
and three or four running races will be carded and 
some good contests are certain. The track will have 
a lot of extra work done on it to make it as last as 
possible and good time may be expected: 



Mr. Henry Struve of Watsonville writes that hi-i 
mare, Hegar Wilkes, nominated in the Pacific Breed- 
ers' Futurity, foaled a nice bay filly on the 23d Inst., 
and he experts her to be in the front ranks wh^n 
she starts. Mr. Strnve recently visited Mr. A. B. 
Spreckels' Aptos Ranch and states that' he saw there' 
as nice a lot of young horses as he ever saw in his" 1 
life, and says there are several fine prospects among 
them. All have size and good looks and he says 
"Sandy" has taught them good manners. They will 
attract much attention when they are put up for sale 
in this city next month. 



NN 

Kenney, the sulky and speed cart man, whose es- 
tablishment at 531 Valencia street is the place to get 
the latest speed vehicles, has sold' to O. Taylor, the 
owner of Billy Ellsworth, a white Kenney training 
cart that is the admiration of everybody that has 
seen it. Kenney has just received some rose colored 
McMurray carts that are beauties, and he also has a 
few unpainted carts and bikes of the McMurray make. 
Buyers thus have a chance to inspect the wood and 
workmanship and order them painted in any color 
to suit. Go out to Kenney's and see them. 



Admiral Togo, the four-year-old by Iran Alto 2.12%, 
out of Aria 2:16% by Bernal, that Joe Cuicello gave a 
record of 2:29% as a two-year-old in 1904, is stepping 
like a 2:10 trotter at Pleasanton. Cuicello, worked 
"the Jap horse" a mile in 2:18 this week. 



Philip C. Byrne, who had announced that he would 
stand the stallion Expressive Mac at Sacramento this 
year, has been induced to take the horse to Hanford, 
Kings county, instead, where he has been assured 
the patronage of a large number of breeders. 



T. C. 2:30 BY NUTWOOD WILKES 
Purchased This Week by George Algeo of Oakland from Nu'.wood Stock Farm. 



1 NOTES AND NEWS. 



•Woodland claims the week prior to the California 
State Fair for its meeting this year. 



Joe Cuicello worked Charley Belden. the Lynwood 
W. gelding owned by ^Mart Rollins, a half in 1:04% 
at Pleasanton one day last week. At the end of a 
mile in 2:20 on another occasion this good trotter 
stepped a half in 1:05 and the railbirds say Joe was 
only buggy riding. 



Sol Shockley of Merced advertises a five-year-old 
sprinter for sale that should do for pony racing or 
polo, as he is 14.2 hands, perfectly sound, and can run 
a quarter in 23 seconds or better. 



It has been officially announced that the champion 
trotter, Lou Dillon 1.58%, will be bred this season to 
John A. McKerron 2:04%. 



George Hayt, of Binghamton, New York, will again 
act as presiding judge on the Grand Circuit and 
Robert Newton of Yorkville, Illinois, will again give 
the drivers the word. 



The pretty two-year-old filly by Stam B. 2:11%. 
whose picture graces our title page this week, is 
owned by Mr. S. Christianson of the Palace Hotel in 
this city and is in James Thompson's string at Pleas- 
anton. She is out of his mare Perza by Allie Wilkes 
2:15, second dam Anglia by Geo. Wilkes. Anglie is 
the dam of Anglina 2:11%, Effie Hill 2:21% and 
grandam of Kellar 2:16%, and William P. Anglin 
2:29%. This filly is well staked and is a very promis- 




wmmmmsmm 



ing potter. Mr. Christianson has a Stam B. two- 
year-jjjd colt which he turned over to Millard Saun- 
ders ' t £n the 22d of this month and just one week 
later launders drove him a mile in 3:03. This colt 
is tlje'. .picture of his sire, and puts on just as much 
style when on dress parade. He Is out of that fast 
mare Marguerite by Don Pedro, owned by Charles 
F. Kapp, who gave her a matinee record of 2:17. 



Barondale 2:11% is commanding a fee of $50 this 
season in Iowa. He is now the sire of seven trotters 
and twelve pacers in the standard list, having had 
six additions to his list in 1905. The young Baron- 
dales in California are very highly thought of, al- 
though none are old enough to race. 



M. Henry of Haywards. who is working quite a 
string of horses at Pleasanton, was in the city this 
week making payments on several colts he has en- 
tered in the Pacific Breeders Futurity. He reports 
his horses at Pleasanton as all doing well. Robert 
C, a gelding by Gossiper, worked a mile In 2:37 last 
week, with the last half in 1:10, and the last quarter 
In 34 seconds. Will Guthrie, a colt by Mr. Henry's 
stallion Educator, trotted a mile in 2:30, with a half 
In 1:13 and a quarter In 35 seconds. Both these 
youngsters can show a mile in 2:20 if necessary. A 
five-year-old McKlnney colt out of a Director mare 
trotted a quarter In 36% seconds, back in 35 and the 
third trial in 34 seconds the first time on the track. 
He looks like a high-class prospect. Frank C, a 
three-year-old pacer by Gossiper. showed a quarter 
In 34 seconds to a Toomey cart. Ed. Kiel, black stal- 
lion by Educator, Is one of the showiest animals at 
tne track. He Is quite a high stepper and has speed 
as well. Educator's colts are all showing well. Offers 
of $250 for yearlings by this son of Director were re- 
fused by two owners recently. 



Sealed bids will be received up to six o'clock this 
evening by Ira B. Kllgore of Concord, for furnishing 
the material and constructing fifty-two (52) box 
stalls for horses at the race track near Concord, 
according to plans and specifications on file in Mr. 
Kilgore's office. 



uniformly good lookers and will be speedy. A three- 
year-old filly by him which Mr. Carter has placed in 
Fred Chadbourne's charge at Pleasanton is a very 
promising young mare that has all the earmarks of 
a high class trotter. 



Recent additions to Budjl Doble's stable are Ed. 
McGary, three-year-old trotting colt by Zombro 2:11, 
dam Dlavolo by Diablo 2:09%, second dam Lilly 
Langtry, dam of Ed. B. Young 2:11%, Dudley 2:14, 
and several others in 2:30. This Is a handsome, good 
gaited colt and very promising. Lilly Dillon, four- 
year-old trotting filly by Sidney Dillon, dam the noted 
old trotting mare Lilly Stanley 2.17%, by Whlppleton, 
sire of the dams of Robeby 2:13%, Clay S. 2:13%, 
and many others. This filly was trained last year 
as a three-year-old by the unfortunate Wlllard Zibble, 
until he met with that sad accident at Fresno. She 
has got some of the famous 'Dillon speed" and gives 
promise of adding another to the list of fast trotters 
by the sire of the trotting queen. Another is also by 
Sidney Dillon, dam Palo Belle 2:24%, by the old war 
horse Palo Alto 2:08%, second dam Belle Isle by Pied- 
mont 2:17%, third dam Ida Belle, dam of Carlisle 
2:22%, by Hambletonian 10, fourth dam Godfrey Star 
by American Star 14. This Is a two-year-old filly 
and while never trained, Is a trotting youngster that 
gives every indication of being as good &s> her royal 
breeding. Her dam is one of the best mares in breed- 
ing and other qualities ever bred to Sidney Dillon In 
California. 



Among the good mares that are being booked to 
Kinney Lou Is Electress Wilkes 2.28%, dam of that 
fast and good trotting filly, Lady Mowry 2:12%, by 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, dam Electress by Richard 
Elector. She is now in foal to the great son of Mc- 
Klnney and her owner, J. C. Mowry, of Newark. Cal., 
believes If one Kinney Lou is good to have, it Is better 
still to have two. 



Hanford Medium 2:11%, one of the fast pacers of 
the California circuit of years ago, is to be raffled 
for $1 a throw at Santa Maria soon, where he Is 
now owned by G. L. Bloaser. 



Mr. T. W. Barstow, owner of that high class pro- 
ducing stallion Nearest 2:22%, own brother to John 
A. McKerron 2.04 %. writes us that he will not move to 
Colorado this season, but will stand his horse and 
train at the San Jose track as usual. More definite 
announcement later. 

Ambush 2:14% will make the season of 1906 at 
Association Park, San Bernardino instead of at the 
farm of his owner, G. W. Bonnell at Redlands. 



Secretary W. H. Gocher has officially promulgated 
the call for the biennial congress of the members of 
the National Trotting Association, to be held at the 
Murray Hill Hotel, New York City, on Wednesday, 
February 14. This will be the twenty-third congress 
of the Association, and in accordance with a resolu- 
tion by a former congress the committee on creden- 
tials will meet at 9 o'clock a. m.. of the above date, 
to receive the credentials of delegates. Any pro- 
posed changes in the rules should be sent to the >sec-i 
retary, to be submitted to the rules committees. Twc 
of the members selected for that committee are W. 
J. Carer, of Richmond, Va., and Chas. Marvin, of Lex-» 
ington, Ky. The other position on the committee 
has been tendered to Col. Robert Hough, the veteran 
starting judge and track manager of Baltimore, who 
has accepted. The rules committee will meet two days 
prior to the congress, to go over the rulea and receive 
any suggestions as to their improvement that • ex- 
perience has demonstrated would be advisable. 



At the meeting of the Kentucky Association of 
Trotting Horse Breeders held in Lexington, Jan. 16, 
R. C. Estill was re-elected president, James E. Clay 
vice-president, and Horace W. Wilson. Lexington, Ky., 
secretary. The treasury was shown to be In a pleth- 
oric condition. 



The good old trotting mare Flora M. 2:16 by Rich- 
ards Elector, who gave the talent such a tremendous 
dump at Sacramento a dozen years ago when the 
Palo Alto horse Truman 2:12 was an overwhelming 
favorite, was shipped to San Jose this week to be 
bred to Mr. Doble's great trotting, stallion. She is 
owned by Mr. Wi J. Dlngee. 

o — 

THE GRAND CIRCUIT FOR 1906. 

Detroit, Mich, July 23-Aug. 4. 
Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 6-11. 
Poughkeepsle, N. Y., Aug. 13-18. 
Readville, Mass., Aug. 20-25. 
Providence, R. I., Aug. 27-Sept. 1. 
Syracuse, N. Y.', Sept. 10-15. 
Columbus, O., Sept. 17-22. 
Cincinnati, O., Sept. 24-29. 

o 

FAIR DATES CLAIMED. 
At the meeting of the North Pacific Fair Associa- 
tion held last week at Portland the following dates 
were agreed upon: 

Seattle Sept. 3 to 8 

Salem Sept. 10 to IB 

North Yakima Sept. 17 to 22 

Spokafcie Sept, 24 to 29 

Walla Walla Oct. J to 6 

Lewlston ........Oct. 8, to 13 

Everett was given the privilege to select such dates 
as they may decide on. 

o 

Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the fest. 



8 



[February 3, 1906 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. I>e WITT. 



THE REVOLVER— HINTS FOR THE NOVICE. 



Technical literature on the revolver is available to 
a certain degree, but it is to be regretted that there 
is practically nothing extant treating on this im- 
portant topic in the style and manner suited to the 
needs of a beginner. The comparatively few publi- 
cations on the subject cater to the experienced marks- 
man and. in consequence, presuppose an Intimacy 
with the art of using what has been called "the her- 
aldic American weapon," the proteceor of the citizen 
-and the equalizer of men; which places the giant 
within the punishing power of the dwarf. 

The prevailing belief of what may be accomplished 
with the revolver Is rather uncomplimentary to a 
very reliable and effective firearm. Many assume 
that the revolver is useless, particularly on a human 
target, at a distance of ten paces or more. Generally 
speaking it is true. There is, however, a good reason 
for this, fur the erroneous impression is the growth 
of opinion prompted by instances in which the prin- 
cipals are both inexperienced and excited when in- 
dulging In gun fire — at bipeds or quadrupeds, as the 
cases may have been. This belief, however, does great 
injustice to the sovereign merits of the six shooter. A 

■ well known revolver expert writing on this subject 
among other statements, says: "But let it be under- 
stood briefly In the revolver's defense, that if somi 
one would place dollar pieces at 50 yards, and allow 
a club of experts to keep what they hit, that some 
one would lose a lot of money before the day was 
over. And if there is a man in America who cannot 

' hit the ace of spades at ten long strides it is his 
own fault." 

The revolver is a type of pistol, differing primarily 
in having a revolving cylinder, hence the name. A 
pistol is a sort of rifle, classified as such. t,o there 
is the relation between both weapons, the gist of 
which is a rifled firearm. Rifling consists of alternate 
grooves and lands throughout the barrel. A revolver 
therefore, is practically a short rifle having a revolv- 
ing cylinder or magazine in which are placed the 
cartridges or ammunition. 

In the selection of a revolver it is equally essential 
to know what to avoid and what to value. Selection 
very often depends upon intelligence, rejection and 
elimination. And, primarily, in choosing a weapon, 
look for defects even in a brand new gun. At the 
outset never buy a weapon of cheap manufacture. 
There are many revolvers catchily advertised as 
"don't pay for reputation," "an honest weapon at an 
honest price," whose chief virtues exist only in ink. 
Shun these as evil, for danger lurks in every inch 
of them. If you would enjoy your sport, enjoy it 
safely. A first-class revolver is the only kind you 
are justified in using. No weapon can be too good; 
a high-grade weapon is never cheap. Then, again, 
allowing a cheap revolver to be safe, they are cer- 
tainly inaccurate. Where lies the use of having 
an inaccurate weapon when accuracy is the thing 
striven for? It has been said that experts use high- 
priced weapons because they are fancy. Nonsense. 
Safety and accuracy are what they pursue. If, per- 
chance, you cannot feel justified in affording a high- 
grade gun new, by all means select a second-hand 
weapon of merit. Because of its utmost importance, 
reject all cheap revolvers. There are but two high- 
grade brands of revolvers made In America; these are 
well established and need not be named here. 

Use a hammer gun only; hammerless, automatic 
pistols and double-action revolvers are delusions and 
snares. The hammerless Is a covered double-action, 
and double-actions are accurate impossibilities. The 
hammer must be raised to full cock, leaving nothing to 
do but aim and pull the trigger. In a double-action 
the trigger lifts the hammer while sighting, the re- 
volver trembles and twitches and this absolutely pre- 
cludes an aim. Many good revolvers are made with 
double-action devices; but these are used entirely as 
single actions; many shooters remove the double- 
action part. An automatic is fairly reliable, but is 
cumbersome and unwieldy. The first shot is slow to 
fire. Afterward it becomes a matter of unnecessary 
danger and is far from satisfactory. Automatics are 
now in the most embryo of development, and the fu- 
ture may produce a perfected weapon which will un- 
doubtedly be a very Interesting production. 

Do not use a barrel less than four inches long, ex- 
clusive of cylinder. Otherwise the sights will be too 
close together to insure an aim and the barrel too 
short to properly shape the bullet. Further, a short- 
barrelled "gun" does not balance nicely, which bal- 
ance should be as near the trigger as possible. 

Picking up the revolver, for the first time at the 
gun dealers, or anywhere else for that matter, open it 
and be absolutely sure it is not loaded. If you do not 
know how to open it, get the salesman to show you, 
or have him do it himself. He will, for one thing, 
think a great deal better of you, than if you took a 
chance of putting the pistol out of commission, for 
nothing so annoys a dealer as inexperienced handling 
and possible damaging of his wares. In this, fire- 
arms dealers are somewhat peculiar; further, an old 
shooter is never backward about asking questions; 
the dealer or clerk knows this. The opposite pre- 
vails with the novice; this is also understood. So it 
is better to pose as an old shooter and be respected, 
instead of being regarded with apprehension. 

Having the weapon open in your hand, carefully 
inspect all the exposed parts for rust and corrosion. 
Don't take the salesman's word for it— not that he 13 



at all mendacious, but to be your own judge. Then, 
carrying the weapon to the sunlight, hold a piece of 
white paper or card at the lower end of the barrel 
at an angle reflecting the light up through it, so 
that by looking through the other end you can see 
the entire inside of the barrel with great distinctness. 
Don't look through the barrel directly at the light, for 
the intense glare will preclude a careful inspection, 
but use the piece of paper as suggested. Notice care- 
fully the "grooves" and the "lands" between them, 
which pursue the barrel spirally. This constitutes the 
•'rifling." See that the edges and corners are cut 
squarely and sharp, for it is the rilling which prepares 
the bullet for its rotating flight to the target. In an 
old gun the rifling is worn; sometimes it is eaten 
away by corrosion, and the resuLt is termed "pitting." 
A pitted barrel scrapes the bullet and fills the "pits" 
with lead, and the barrel then becomes what is called 
"leaded." A bullet from a leaded barrel flies off from 
its course in any indescribable direction. These er- 
ratic flights are termed "fliers" or "unaccountables." 
These will, at times, miss a target clean. Occasion- 
ally, and very often from an inferior f^jift. the buUet 
will turn sideways in its flight, producing "keyholes" 
i — a descriptive name of the puncture In the target. 
These defects militate irredeemably against accuracy. 
So in selecting the weapon beware of "pits." 

It is next in the order of choosing a weapon to 
look to the "chamber alignment." The chamber is 
the place in the cylinder which holds the cartridge, 
liach chamber in the cylinder should lock directly 
behind the lower end of the barrel. To examine this 
close the breech, cock the hammer, and, pointing the 
gun to the light, look through the firing-pin orifice. 
Through this you can readily see whether the cham- 
ber is in collimation with the barrel when the cyl- 
inder is locked and to all intents and purposes the 
weapon is ready for firing. Should you detect a cres- 
cent of metal at either side, or at the top or bot- 
trin, just where the chamber butts up to the barrel, 
he alignment is undesirable. An improper chamber 
alignment, like pittings, will strip the bullet, lead the 
barrel and develop the same results. The stripping of 
the bullet spoils its roundness, and in so doing allows 
an uneven escape of gas when the bullet emerges from 
the barrel. This uneven escape of gas throws the 
bullet out of plumb, and consequently out of its 
course. One may suggest that the bullet is at the 
muzzle scarcely long enough for this. The bullet may 
be quick, but the gas is quicker, the bullet depending 
upon the gas for its speed; and the result is with us 
just the same. 

These defects already described may presuppose a 
new gun as well as an old one. If the purchaser is 
selecting a second-hand weapon numerous other de- 
fects are to be guarded against. At the upper end of 
the cartridge chamber is a thickening or "collar," and 
a careless shooter will allow the crease in front of 
it to become filled and corroded, thereby weakening 
the cylinder; and ,a weak cylinder is always a source 
of danger. In the second-hand weapon "bulgings" 
are to be looked for. Then, again, an unscrupulous 
or ignorant dealer will remove the pits from a barrel, 
and to an unsophisticated purchaser this barrel will 
appear fine and smooth. A very careful inspection 
is necessary to avoid being hoodwinked by this ruse. 
So if you come upon an old gun, scarred and rusted, 
but with an apparently smooth and shining barrel, 
the chances are this barrel has been tampered with; 
that this barrel has been "cleaned," say with flour 
of emery. Reject this gun forthwith. Better buy an 
honest gun with a pitted barrel, relying upon get- 
ting a new barrel from the factory. But in this event 
make sure the old gun will not cost more in the end 
than if you bought a new gun outright. 

Another defect, but one which can be readily . reme- 
died, is a poor trigger pull. A slow, rasping trigger 
which grates along is very disconcerting to the aim 
An otherwise good aim is often spoiled by this alone. 
This defect is termed a "creep," and a good trigger 
pull goes crisp and sharp. The trigger should hold 
fast till just the right pressure is brought and then 
be up and away quick and with a snap. As any 
first-class gunsmith can readily correct a bad trigger, 
this defect is scarcely sufficient to warrant a rejection 
of the weapon. , 

Your gunsmith can also regulate the weight of the 
trigger pull. Three pounds makes a nice, reliable 
trigger which does not operate prematurely. "Hair- 
triggers" are abominations. Somewhat "finer", shoot- 
ing may be done at times with a hair-trigger, but 
for general purposes they are unsatisfactory and dan- 
gerous. Official shooting is done with a 2% -pound 
pull, which is weighted by placing a dead weight on 
the trigger three-eighths of an inch from its end. 

The chief difficulty met in aiming and firing the 
revolver lies in the proper execution of the trigger 
pull. The novice grasps the handle and undertakes 
to "pull" the trigger by merely increasing the crook- 
edness of his finger. A miss, and he blames the 
weapon: hence, the universal condemnation that the 
arm is impractical; or he says he cannot hold it 
steady. Practice, of course, develops the nvuscles of 
the arm and perfects steady holding, which is a fac- 
tor in favor of a good shot. But the best "hold" is 
entirely useless when the weapon is "pulled" way out 
of alignment with the target. A shot from a good 
weapon goes straight to where it Is pointed, and it is 
the shooter, not the weapon, who misses. 

Standing nearly erect, but with the shoulders tilted 
slightly back, the feet separated comfortably about 



fourteen inches, without straddling, with the arm ex- 
tended free from the body, the shooter is in the cor- 
rect position for revolver practice. This puts the 
body at an even balance, and no unsteadying muscular 
effort is necessary, which would disconcert the aim. 
Stand freely and comfortably with the body at ease. 

Load the weapon with but one cartridge at a time, 
and, upon firing, leave the empty shell in the chamber, 
loading the next and firing until the cylinder is filled 
with empty shells. This distributes the work evenly 
among the chambers, and there is no perceptible 
change in the weight of the gun, as would be the case 
if the chambers were all loaded at first and then 
fired till empty. This system minimizes danger. No 
one is lounging about with a loaded weapon; then, 
again, ammunition in the other chambers is not 
spoiled by loosened bullets or primers. There being 
no occasion for rapid shooting, this system may be 
readily followed, and the shooter gains thereby a 
beneficial rest between shots. 

This system would not be practical in actual serv- 
ice; but in this instancet he bullets are fixed firmly 
by heavy "crimping." the shell being tightly closed 
around the bullet. For hunting or personal protec- 
tion the service ammunition should be used. As 
crimping is slightly injurious to the bullet, target 
shooters fire from uncrimped shells, loading one at a 
time. But at the target, even with crimped shells, it 
is safer to follow the target system. Most clubs 
make a rule of this which is enforced very strictly. 

The manner or trick of "pulling" the trigger is the 
msyterious key to successful revolver shooting. Aim- 
•' ing and firing being done with but one hand, the best 
aim possible is invariably frustrated by an improper 
pull. It is not so much to hold steady as it is to 
pull steady. A revolver may be grasped and pointed 
well, but the convulsive jerk of a pulling finger undoes 
everything. The trigger should be "squeezed." The 
stock, the trigger, and the space between, must be 
regarded as one entire solid object which Is to be 
squeezed or pressed evenly, gradually and steadily 
from all sides at once. This pressure being exerted 
from each direction contemporaneously, keeps the 
weapon pointed steadily according to the aim and does 
not detract from it. This gradual, even "squeeze," 
coming from all sides at once, ultimately releases the 
hammer without deflecting the aim. The weapon at 
the time of discharge thus retains its aim and the 
bullet flies to its intended mark. This is the great 
and only secret of success with the revolver. Having 
acquired the necessary dexterity in squeezing, the 
shooter is the master of any weapon and can always 
rely upon himself In any emergency. 

As a question might be interjected here of "how 
about the 'kick?'" a word or two. This so-called 
"kick" is a mere bugbear and nothing more. It suf- 
fices to say the bullet is a long ways from the gun 
before the "kick" scarcely begins. So, standing in 
the position described, grasp the weapon as indicated, 
firmly but without tension or strain, confine your at- 
tention to the aligning of the sights upon the target 
and of properly executing the squeeze. Keep your 
mind off the anticipated discharge of the cartridge. 
That will take care of itself, and the anticipation of 
the report can serve only to unnerve the shooter. If. 
upon making an attempt to shoot, you find your 
"holding" is poor, or that your aim is tiring, lay the 
weapon down and take a short rest. Concentrate your 
migd upon conscientiously executing each shot and 
never fire at random. One properly fired shot is of 
value, while all the random shots you could blaze 
away would be of no benefit. Then pick up your 
weapon and try again, grasping it correctly, aligning 
the sights and starting the gradual, even squeeze. Do 
this and your bullet will land there or thereabouts, 
and the result will be worth while. 

At first this "squeeze" may appear to be a. slow 
and unsatisfactory way of shooting; that th* other 
man could have emptied his gun at you while you 
were firing once. But here, this "squeeze"- Is per- 
fected with practice, and in a short time develops 
into certain and rapid matter. And then, again, what 
damage has an Incompetently emptied revolver done? 
The hit is the thing, though it -were slow in starting. 

Now provide yourself with sufficient ammunition of 
reputable manufacture, betake yourself to some con- 
venient range, and, with but one shell in the gun, 
which must at all times be kept pointed toward the 
target, practice— and practice continuously. 

o 

Cleaning Guns. 

Running oiled cloths through a gun or rifle barrel 
will not always soften and remove the fouling, though 
to the eye the interior may appear perfectly clean and 
bright. Wood alcohol is a better dissolvent of the 
residue, but a rifleman who has made the subject a 
study claims that ammonia is the best of all. The 
final operation in all cases is to wipe the interior 
thoroughly dry and then apply a good coating of oil. 

The Late F. S. Stedman. 

Frederick S. Stedman, secretary of the Du Quesne 
Kennel Club and of the American Pomeranian Club, 
a prominent and esteemed Pittsburg fancier, passed 
away in Pittsburg on January 22. 



Walter Parrish of Stockton recently lost by death 
his good Cocker 'Paddy," for that was the kennel 
name of Mr. Longers, a winner at several shows. .. 



The Second Annual Produce Stakes' of the Bull 
Terrier Breeders' Association will be held at the 
Hotel Irlington, New York, on February 12, 1906, at 
10:30 p. m. Mr. Bellin, who will also pass upon this 
breed at the New York Show, will be , the judge. 
A number of very promising puppies are entered and 
the competition promises to be very interesting. 



On a hot day drink Jackson's Napa Soda lemonadu 
and be refreshed. 



February. 3, i»i 6] 



9 

C- 1 



COLORS IN GREAT DANES. 



The Great Dane Club has adopted the_ standard of 
the German Doggen-Klub for colors, and I think it 
will interest the Dane fanciers to know what these 
colors are. According to the description of dogs de 
luxe, edited by the "Kennel Association of Breeders 
of Dogs de Luxe and Fox Terriers" in Germany, 
which contains the standard of the "Deutsche Dogge," 
standard mentioned also by the Stud Book, vol. 2, 
published by the Deutscher Doggen-Club, in con- 
junction with the Nationaler Doggen-Club, there are 
three divisions of colors— (a) brindle Danes, (b) uni- 
colored Danes, and (c) harlequins. 

(a) Brindle Danes — The ground color from the 
lightest yellow to the darkest fawn, always with ob- 
lique (transversal) black stripes. (b) ITnicolored 
Danes — Yellow or grey (blue) in the most various 
shades, either of one color or with darker shades on 
the muzzle and round the eyes and streak on the 
back. The nose in brindles a.nd unicolored Dunes 
must always be black, the eye.s and nails dark, white 
markings allowed only on the chest, between the 
front legs, and exceptionally on the paws (toes). In 
blue Danes lighter eyes are permissible, but in no 
case "glassy" eyes, (c) Harlequin Danes — The grounu 
color white, with irregularly broken, but possibly sym- 
metrically dsitributed all over the body black patches 
(a few gray spots are allowed). In Harlequin Danes 
"glassy" eyes, fiesh-colored and spotted nose, as well 
as light-colored nails, are not faulty. 

It will probably interest the Dane fanciers in this 
country to know that the Dalmatians are called 
"Petits Danois" (little Danes) in Belgium and France, 
probably on account of their markings. 

Now that the date is fast approaching when the 
new rule as to colors of the Great Dane Club wil\ 
"be in force, it will be very interesting to mention 
what our German "cousins," the pioneers of the 
"Deutsche Dogge" in the world, do in order to obtain 
the clean colors. The Germans say that they like all 
colors when the latter are clean. The same applies 
to Austria, Holland and Belgium, but it is otherwise 
in France. Not that the French have not an "entente 
cordiale" in clean colors with the other countries, 
but they, for instance, do not like at all the brindle- 
and-fawn Danes. On the contrary, the French, es- 
pecially the Parisians, are fond of blue Danes and 
black-and-white Harlequins. Every Dane breeder In 
German knows how to mate the colors in order to 
obtain clean ones. Badly colored Danes are very 
seldom seen in their country, and their owners have 
simply no courage to exhibit these dogs. Before 
going any further into the subject, I wish it to be 
understood that I do not presume teaching the old, 
experienced breeder, who knows his "business" well, 
but I do want to help the inexperienced one — the nov- 
ice. I think that now is just the time for taking the 
question of colors in Danes into serious considera- 
tion, as the result of the end of this month's mating 
will just fall at the beginning of January, 1906, when 
the new rule of the Great Dane Club comes into 
force. In Germany they mate, in the first instance, 
brindles with brindles, because they (the Germans) 
possess a sufficient "material" of dark brindles and 
light brindles. In the second instance they mate 
brindles with fawns. Then they mate in the first in- 
stance fawns with fawns, and in the second instance 
fawns with brindles. It is risky to match a blue 
bitch to a blue dog with Harlequin blood in him; in 
this case it is preferable to mate her to a black dog. 
Black-and-white Harlequins must always be mated 
with black-and-white Harlequins. If the bitch has 
much white she must be put to a dog with much black, 
, and vice versa; or a Harlequin bitch with much white 
can be put to a pure bred black dog — i. e., a black dog 
bred from Harlequins. 

By mating fawns with blues one may get biscuit 
fawns; by mating blues with brindles one may obtain 
inferior brindles. These latter are most dangerous 
for breeding, as it does not take a few generations, 
but many, many generations to get rid of the wrong 
blood, which an experienced eye can see at a glance on 
the progeny.— English Stock Keeper. 

o ■ 

DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 

Portland Kennel Club. 

A communication from a Portland subscriber, dated 
January 23d. among other things states: 

"The' following officers were elected by the Port- 
land Kennel Club at the annual meeting last night: 
President, J. Wesley Ladd; vice-president, Dr. Er- 
nest F. Tucker; treasurer, Henry Ladd Corbett; mem- 
bers of the board of directors, W. B. Fechelmer, 
Frank E. Watkins, Dr. J. C. %an and Henry Berger, 
Jr! The meeting was not very largely attended, for 
there were just enough members present to form 
.a quorum, but these were the most enthusiastic 
among the dog fanciers in this city. 

"The meeting was called to order with Vice-Presi- 
dent F. A. Fleming In the chair, and aside from the 
election the principal item transacted was the chang- 
ing of the date of the annual meeting from the last 
week In December to the last Wednesday In the 
month following the holding of the annual bench 
sho^y ' This move was made In order to secure a bet- 
ter attendance among the members of the club, many 
of whom find It Inconvenient to be present at this 
time of the year. 

"It /was also decided upon motion of J. A. Taylor 
that the club should be incorporated as soon as the 
new officials take office and a secretary is> chosen by 
them. This office was left open In order to enable 
the new board of directors to make a selection for 
the office, as F. F. Wamsley, the retiring secretary, 
declined the place on account of business and no one 
present desired to assume the responsibility. 

"According to the members of the club the coming 



bench show will eclipse anything of the kind ever 
held by the club in the past. The affairs of the club 
are in a flourishing condition, the report of the secre- 
tary showing a balance of $605.54 in the treasury. 
The treasurer's report was not presented at the meet- 
ing for the reason that Mr. Goldman is out of the 
city on business and promised to turn over his ac- 
counts as soon as he returned. 

"Frank E. Watkins was made custodian of the sec- 
retary's books until a man for the office shall be 
chosen." 

Requisites of a Good Field Dog. 

The first requisite to a good field dog is his ability 
to find and point game, and upon his method of find- 
ing, and the snap and vim with which he goes at n, 
will depend the place he will occupy when the judges 
get through with him; he may run fast enough and 
cover a large amount of ground, as far as distance is 
concerned, but this question always conies into con- 
sideration in placing the winners in a field trial; an 
the contestants being found good bird dogs, as far as 
pointing and nose goes, then arises the question: 
Which has the most style, which has the best face, 
the snappiest way of going, the most style in point- 
ing birds, and the best range and hunting ability. 
There are a great many fast, wide-ranging dogs that 
never win a place at a field trial, and their owners 
wonder why, but it is the combination of all of these 
good and desirable qualities that the winner may 
possess in order to make him valuable to the kennol 
world. Some breeders think a field trial nothing 
more than a race and exhibition of speed, but the "all- 
heels" quality is not thee predominating one; yet this 
fact remains and forces itself to the front in every 
contest, that out of several competitors for honors at 
any trial, the dog which has the widest range, fastest 
pace, coupled with style, pointing ability used to ad- 
vantage, usually wins, and it is this dog that is 
known as the high-class field-trial dog, and whoso 
services are eagerly sought by the prominent breeders 
throughout the country. We frequently hear men 
say: "Oh, my dog is no field-trial dog; he is only a 
good shooting dog, and the best one I ever saw." 
True; but what makes him the "best you ever saw?" 
The simple fact that this same shooting dog may be 
the son or daughter of one of the high-class field- 
trial dogs that has had good qualities developed and 
proven, and who would probably range a quarter of 
a mile away. Your puppy possibly would not range 
fifty yards away, but, if he has been properly bred 
and you have the record of his sire and dam to back 
him up, it is safe to say he will take after them in 
many respects, and it devolves upon the trainer to 
bring out his natural qualities. 



Size of Fox Terriers. 

The question of size in Fox Terriers is one which 
will never be settled; it is too much a question of in- 
dividual liking. A show Fox Terrier, however, is one 
thing and the "working man" is another. The former 
is a dog combing style with substance and quality, 
with soundness of conformation. The "workman" 
generally shows all the characteristics of his profes- 
sion — a wide chest, a strong head, and a general lack 
of race or quality. His performances above or under 
ground count for nothing in the show ring, in fact, his 
very prowess with fox or badger implies that his 
development has not been in accordance with the 
exacting demand of the show ring. 

No one who has a valuable dog cares to risk letting 
him "go to earth," except in a very half-hearted man- 
ner, for the purpose of advertising the gameness of 
his strain. An eye is too easily lost or an ear dis- 
figured for life to make such diversion profitable. In 
these days of keen competition the show dog's career 
is necessarily a very limited one. * Youth will be 
served," and to win the highest honors a dog must 
have all youth's freshness, activity and beauty of out- 
line. Hence the modern show Fox Terrier is in a 
class far removed from the "workingstamp." Many- 
years of intelligent breeding have produced in him 
a beautiful type of animal, the natural outcome of all 
the thought and study that have been devoted to his 
development. 



He Is Still With Us. 

In response to numerous inquiries we will state 
that the J. E. Lucas whose name appears in the 
roster of lost passengers of the ill-fated Valencia, 
is not the well known handler, John E. Lucas of 
Mount View Kennels. "Munzie" informed us during 
the trials at Bakersfield that he would stay in that 
locality until probably the first of April. At last ac- 
counts he was still in Kern county with his string 
of dogs. 



Denver Show. 

The Colorado Kennel Club have decided to hold 
their show on March 8, 9 and 10, 1906, at Denver. 
The early work is progressing nicely, and there are 
indications thai. I lie show will be the greatest that 
was ever held in the State. 



Coast Judges. 

We notice In the American Stock-Keeper comment 
on Coast judges and an extract from an obscure 
publication criticising the Pasadena show. 

The excerpt was purely a case of sour grapes. The 
Pasadena people did very well for an Initial show. 
The Inuendo that comment was made In the hearing 
of the Judge — "Of course we know that this talk 
didn't interfere with the Judges or some decisions 
wouldn't have gone the way they did." Sour grapes 
and a reflex of a mind that is facile with all tricks 
and shady Innovations of dogdom. 

Probably the writer fancied to have seen In the 
Pasadena ring a certain Individual whose reputation 
In dogdom is tersely expressed by nine people out of 



ten when referring to him. Coast dogdom nnd Coast 
judges would be all right and everything lovely could 
there be eliminated from the fancy certain miasmatic, 
blackguard influences that have done more to retard 
advancement than anything else. 

This influence has been clever enough to tempor- 
arily divert the finger of suspicion and consequent 
deserved ostracism. 

Diarrhoea and Dysentery in Puppies. 

There is a great deal of mortality among puppies 
of all breeds which is due to diarrhoe or dysentery, 
which is simply an aggravated form of diarrhoeea. 
The causes of this are several, and perhaps in the 
majority of cases the presence of worms is respon- 
sible for it. When that is so, of course the proper 
course of treatment is to give a vermifuge and get 
rid of these pests. We need not enter further upon 
that, for it is a subject which has been very fre- 
quently dealt with in this column. There are, how- 
ever, other causes, and most common of all is the 
giving of sour or unwholesome food. Soft or semi- 
jiquld foods will very quickly become sour, and care 
should be taken that no such food is allowed in re- 
main from one feeding time to another. 

Only prepare as much as is required for one meal 
at a time, and if any remains, get rid of it before it 
sets up fermentation or becomes unwholesome. It 
must be borne in mind that young puppies when they 
are weaned are very liable to disturbance of the di- 
gestive organs, because hitherto they have been sub- 
sisting mainly upon milk, and when you begin to give 
them solid food of course nature is called upon to 
perform a different digestive task. Care, therefore, 
should be taken that puppies are weaned very grad- 
ually, for it Is useless to expect a puppy to survive 
a sudden change of food from an entire milk diet on 
to an entire diet of patent foods. The first result of 
indigestion in a puppy will be an attack of diarrhoea. 
Should this come on, pay attention at once to the 
food, returning to a milk or milk and barley water 
diet for a day or two, first giving the puppy a good 
dose of castor oil to clear and soothe the intestines. 



Diet All Important. 

When a dog is ailing one of the most important 
considerations is his diet. In ordinary health a sturdy 
dog can make quite light of swallowing all sorts of 
indigestible things; he will even be able to digest 
bones, but if he is ill it is surprising how speedily the 
digestive functions become deranged, so that in a 
serious case the dog may not even be able to keep a 
simple thing like milk down. Everything, of course, 
depends upon the nature of the ailment from which he 
is suffering, and the seriousness of it or otherwise: 
and it may not be desirable to give any solid food at 
all, particularly if the dog be feverish. By the aid of 
a clinical thermometer, which has been so frequently 
advocated in this column, it is always possible to tell 
at once whether the dog is feverish. 

When the clinical thermometer shows a degree of 
fever, it means that there is inflammation in the 
system somewhere, and that is a warning which must 
not be neglected. The meaning of it is, so far as diet 
is concerned, that the dog must not have any solid 
food whatever until the symptom abates. In any 
case, when a dog is not well, it is always safe to 
give liquid or semi-liquid food. Good sheep's head 
broth, barley water, and oatmeal gruel, milk, gravy 
and such like, are the proper foods for a dog which 
is either seriously ill or is convalescent; and it may be 
remarked that when a dog is convalescent it is most 
important that too great a strain should not be put 
suddenly upon his digestive powers until they have 
had time to recuperate. A return to solid food, there- 
fore, should only be made gradually. 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Bob Whites and Pheasants Thrive. 

Game Warden George Neale of Sacramento county 
is meeting with success of the most pronounced char- 
acter in the propagation of two species of game 
birds imported in an attempt to restock the depleted 
game supply of this section of the State, says the 
Union. A few pair of bob white quail, liberated last 
season by Mr. Neale on the Rancho Del Paso, have 
multiplied to such an extent that there are now 
hundreds of birds of that variety in the brush and 
thickets of the grant, 

By arrangement with the management of the ranch 
the birds will be protected for a period of two years 
by which time, it is believed, they will be so numerous 
as to admit of a brief open season. A curious feature 
of their development Is due to the absence of polygamy 
among the bob white quail. Unmated members of 
the flock have taken up homes at some distance from 
their feathered relatives, and some of them are found 
with chickens and pigeons in barnyards at the edge 
of town, where their visits are encouraged by people 
who were at a loss to account for their appearance. 

Native or "valley" quail are also doing well on the 
Raffgin grant, and in other localities where land- 
owners and sportsmen have agreed upon their pro- 
tection. These birds, at one time so scarce that their 
extinction was threatened, are expected to furnish 
splendid sport within a couple of years if not relent- 
lessly pursued with dog and gun prior to that time. 
On the grant shooting at any species of quail Is pro- 
hibited, because there ale few hunters able to dis- 
tinguish between bob white and native quail In the 
brief Interval before pulling the trigger. 

Game Warden Neale has also received satisfactory 
reports regarding the English pheasants liberated 
some time ago. He Is satisfied that this variety will 
thrive and multiply rapidly after this season and Is 
giving considerably attention to their program. 

T. S. Palmer, who has charge of the government 
commission devoted to fish and game Interests, Is 
manifesting considerable Interest In Mr. Ncale's at- 



10 



[February 3. 1906 



tempt to populate the country with imported birds. 
He has wTitten to find out what they eat and In 
what localities they esablish homes, with a view ^ to 
fuHure introduction of birds in favorable localities 

(ft is because of the interest shown by Sacramento 
,-ountv in the protection of game that the State Com- 
mission has favored Mr. Neale with the choice of 
several imported varieties of game. 

To Protect Striped Bass. . ... 

Members of the California Anglers Association 
are considering two measures designed to protect 

striped bass, one of which will be presented at the 
next session of the Legislature. One of these con- 
template a close season of two years, while the other 
would provide for a close season hereafter during 
February and March of each year. 

The marked decrease in the supply of striped bass 
in the waters of the bay has stirred the members of 
the association to action. They felt some radical 
measures must be taken or else this great game and 
food fish will be completely wiped out here, sharing 
the fate of the sturgeon. 

Jabez Swan, one of the directors of the associa- 
tion, makes the following statement: 

"The enormous catches of striped bass made by 
professional fishermen has reduced the supply to a 
remarkable extent. Five years ago many bass were 
caught in the Oakland estauary. San Leandro bay, San 
Pablo bay, the tributaries of Petaluma creek and in 
all the small streams up to the mouth of the Sacra- 
mento river. 

"The waters of the bay have been depleted to such 
an extent thnt sportsmen trolling in Raccoon straits 
get no fish, while in other places not 10 per cent of the 
fish are taken by anglers which were caught some 
years ago. From various causes the fish have be- 
come scarce and will become extinct in a few years 
like the sturgeon, of which not one is seen here now. 

"Bass go in schools and their presence is indicated 
by the seagulls and by other signs known to the mar- 
ket fishermen. When a school is located a haul is 
made running Into tons in weight. Most of these fish 
range from one-half to three pounds in weight, the 
latter being the smallest supposed to be taken under 
the law. These under-sized fish may be obtained at 
almost any restaurant in this city. The little fish 
markets in the suburbs also have these under-sized 
fish for sale at all times. Tons may be seen being 
packed for the country or sold for consumption here 
almost every day in the year. 

"Another, and, if anything, a more deadly enemy 
than the market fishermen, is the refuse oil which is 
discharged from ships and refineries about the bay. 
This drifts onto the marsh grasses and tules and then 
settles down upon the roe of the bass, destroying 
millions of the embryo bass. The officials charged 
with the prevention of this seem powerless to cope 
with the evil. 

"This city supplies today about one-third of the 
fish consumed in this State. If the supply is to be 
maintained a decided stand must be taken by the 
officials in the protection of the food fishes. Set-nets, 
which are against the law, are reported at the mouths 
of sloughs all over the bay. Seizure or prosecution 
by the officials are heard of only occasionally. The 
people should rise up and protect this most valuable 
of food fishes in the bays and rivers. 

"The California Anglers' Association is setting on 
foot a scheme whereby something may be done ef- 
fectually in this direction. While the bass are pro- 
lific, they cannot stand everything, and some radical 
measures must be taken for their preservation. Our 
association has under consideration two measures, one 
of which will be presented at the next session of the 
Legislature. One of these contemplates a close season 
of two years to give the bass an opportunity to mul- 
tiply and replenish the waters completely. The other 
provides for a two-month close season each year in- 
stead of one month, as at present. 

"There has been a noticeable falling off in the sup- 
ply since last year, and severe measures must be 
taken at once or else the fish will be wiped out." 

American Bred Dogs. 

This vexed question has, for the time being, been 
settled by the Ladies' Kennel Association of Massa- 
chusetts in a most thoroughly sportsmanlike manner, 
according to the Boston Herald, which says: 

There is no topic in dogdom being more universally- 
discussed by breeders, fanciers and exhibitors than the 
restrictions that have been placed on Canadian dogs 
at shows held in the United States. Heretofore there 
has been no distinction between Canadian-bred and 
American-bred dogs, and while many believe that it 
is all very well for the American Kennel Club to put 
up the bars against dogs bred in Great Britain or any 
other foreign country, the term American as applied 
to dogs should, it is claimed, include dogs bred In 
Canada. This action of the American Kennel flub 
was not favorably received by the Ladies' Kennel 
Association of Massachusetts, which believes in reci- 
procity in kennel matters, as well as in commercial 
life. The Ladies' Kennel Club now announces that 
in all of the valuable special prizes, which it has 
given for the annual bench show of the New England 
Kennel Club to be held in Boston next month, in 
which Amerlcm-bred dogs are mentioned, the asso- 
ciation stands by the old definition. In other words, 
the specials donated by the association are open equal- 
ly to Canadian-bred and American bred dogs. 

Illegal Meshed Net Seized. 

Deputy Game Warden R. McDonald of Stockton 
recently seized" a 600-foot net, the meshes of which 
were less than the legal size. Two men, for whom 
warrants have been issued, were using the net in 
Disappointment slough. 



Many quail limits have recently been shot in the 
vicinity of Milton, San Joaquin county. 



Shooting Hints for Beginners. 

It is not altogether surprising, when one comes to 
think of it, that every' youth sooner or later, should 
evince a desire to become the possessor of a gun. 
From his earliest days he is, wisely or unwisely, en- 
couraged to take an interest In popguns and toy pis- 
tols, and his parents, no doubt, forget that the day 
will come when the young hopeful of the family is no 
longer satisfied with these, comparatively harmless 
weapons, but must needs become the owner o£ some- 
thing more like the real article. At such times the 
fond parents begin to ask themselves whether it Is' 
wise to encourage in their child that natural Instinct 
of affection for something that makes a noise, which 
instinct in time develops into that stronger desire for 
"killing something." But it is then too late to consider 
such things. The average boy is a self-willed young 
person, and, the more you try to keep things out of his 
reach, the more he will endeavor to obtain them. 
Nor is there really any reason, why his desire to 
possess dangerous weapons should be checked writes 
a contributor to the English Shooting Times. Your 
warlike boy is worth a dozen of his more peacefully 
inclined brethren, and he who shows the sporting in- 
stinct when young is far more likely to turn out a 
good fellow later on than the youth of the molly- 
coddle type, who has no venturesome spirit in his com- 
position. 

There is, one may assert, without fear of contra- 
diction, no harm whatever in allowing the youngster 
to follow his own natural inclinations in the matter 
of catapults, slings, airguns and such like weapons of 
early youth, nor need one hesitate to encourage him in 
their use, provided that — and here lies the gist of the 
whole matter — the beginner is properly schooled in 
the use of these early emblems of warfare. 

Even the toy pistol which shoots a small shot, and, 
of course, the airgun, are capable of doing a good deal 
of damage and serious injury if carelessly used, and 
those who have charge of the youngster with his ju- 
venile weapons of danger cannot be too careful to 
inculcate into his naturally retentive mind the first 
principle of safety. Youth, as we all know, is easily- 
impressed, and bad habits, as we all know, learned 
when young, are not easily forgotten. Nor can a 
youth of 18 or 20 learn so readily as one half his age 
the elementary portion of any particular training. 
Carelessness with firearms is a thing Which we often 
see in the field; but it will be noted that offenders in 
this respect are more usually to be found among those 
who have taken up shooting late in life, than in those 
who begin to learn the game at the beginning of their 
'teens. The older man, and, indeed, sometimes the 
youth, only too often thinks that, because he knows 
a good many things, he knows all — that which per- 
tains to the use of firearms included. Perhaps he is a 
fair shot or on the road to become one, and he there- 
fore imagines, very erroneously, that his behavior is 
all that can be desired. But a man may be a good 
shot, and yet be very careless with his gun. One sees 
instances of this almost every day, and ninety-nine 
out of every hundred shooting "'acidents" are due to 
the arrant carelessness of someone. Boys are not the 
most common offenders in this respect; but, unless 
they are properly schooled, they are more than likely 
to cause some terror among their companions in the 
field. There are many men who, if they but knew it, 
ought never to be allowed to handle a gun; and their 
ignorance of their own carelessness costs them dear. 
How many men are there who find that they do not 
get asked to shoot so often as they would like or 
expect? But they generally search for all kinds of 
reasons for this, rather than attribute it to the real 
cause — carelessness on their own part. Unfortunately, 
it is always difficult to tell anyone that he is careless 
with firearms. A host is the only man who can do it, 
ajtd even he, especially if he be a younger man than 
his guest always finds it a disagreeable task. He 
naturally hesitates to offend a man who may be one 
of his best friends, and few people care to have their 
errors pointed out to them even in the most friendly 
and quiet way. For all that, it is sometimes neces- 
sary to call out to a dangerous man to be more care- 
ful, even in the presence of the rest of the party, and 
it is far better to run the risk of mortally offending 
one member, rather than allow the lives of the rest to 
be endangered. 

The first lesson, therefore, of the beginner is that 
which concerns safety, and in this respect matters are 
far more easy for him nowadays than they were in 
the days of his grandfather. The up-to-date breech- 
loader is a very different thing to the old-fashioned 
muzzle-loader, with its "hang-fires," unexploded 
charges, and other dangerous features, and the tyro 
of to-day has to observe but a few simple rules to 
ensure the safety of himself and his fellows. . There 
are any number of ways of carrying a gun, but only 
three of these at the most can be considered safe, 
and then only according to circumstances. The safest 
and best way of all is over the shoulder, holding the 
stock by the thin part behind the trigger-guard or at 
the butt, but always with the trigger-guard upper- 
most and not, as so many people still persist in doing, 
with the trigger-guard underneath. Under the arm 
is a good way of carrying a gun if going through 
covert, or when on a long tramp, and an occasional 
change from this to the shoulder position and back 
again will be found to add greatly to one's comfort. 
When one is walking in line, the gun is best carried 
across one arm at an angle of not less 1 than 45 de- 
grees, the barrels pointing forward and downwards. 
Thus carried, the gun is always ready for a shot, and 
one's companions' to the left are always safe. The 
over-shoulder position, with the small part of the 
stock grasped in one's right hand, as referred to above. 
Is also a good position when walking in line. It will 
be found that, while the gun is in the safest position 
possible, especially in the case of a stumble over a 
root or other obstacle, it can be brought to the "pre- 
sent" in an Instant. 



COMING EVENTS. 
Rod. 

Jan 1 -June l-Closed season for black basa. 

aetri n , Ud?wa I ter.°' ,t lft " Feb - , ~ 0pen " eM00 for taklng 8teoJ - 

Sept. 10-Oot. 18-Close aeason in tidewater for steelhead. 

Sept. 10-Oot. 18— Close season for catching salmon. 

Sept. 15-April 1-Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 
wateV. 16 " 1 * 07 ' 1!> " cl0!W 8eason f ° r Uklng salmon abore tide. 

Nov. l-Aprll 1— Trout season closed, 
w^ier' '" Apr11 1 - c,ose(J season for taking steelhead above the 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs, 
water' I5 ~ 8ept - I0 -Se»«» open for taking salmon above tide 
Gun. 

July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

Sept. l-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 

&£6 D6Q. 

Oot. 15-Feb. 15— Open season for quail, ducks, etc. 

Oct. 15-Aprll 1— Open season for English snipe. 

Oct. 15-Aug 1— Deer season closed. 

Bench Shows. 

i/S 3 ,- 13 t 15 -westmtnster Kennel Club. New York. Robt V 
McKlm, Seoretary. Entries olose Jan. 25. 

f™™ c' ^T 1 * 8 " England Kennel Club. Boston. Wm. B 
Emery, Seoretary. Entries close Jan. 30. 

F F p^m„ a / o 3_ y il8hll l? ton Kennel clUD - Washington, Pa. 
*. C. Thomas, Secretary. Entries olose Feb. 2» 

T^iiVsSer!?"?. 6 ™ ° hl ° Kenn81 ° 1Ub - H8mUt ° n ' ° h, °- 
March 7, 10-Duquesne Kennel Club. PIttsburi,, Pa F S 
Steadman. Secretary. Entries close Feb. 25. 

te" a SeoretBry? 0l0rSd0 KeDDel C ' Ub - Denver ' Co1 ' T - W - ■ Uar ' 



TRADE NOTES. 



Averages Reported. 

Chicago, 111., Jan. 1.— W. D. Stannard, first, gen- 
eral average, 96 out of 100, shooting "DuPont;" J. S. 
Boa. second, general average, 91 out of 100, shooting 
"DuPont;" Dr. Lovell and E. B. Shogren, both of 
Chicago, and booth shooting "DuPont," tied for first 
amateur and third general average, 90 out of 100; W. 
Einfeldt, Oak Park, 111., third amateur, average, 87 
out of 100. 

Holmesburg, Junction, Pa., Jan. 1.— L. J. Squier, 
first, general average, 160 out of 189, shooting "Du- 
Pont;" C. H. Newcomb. Philadelphia, Pa., first ama- 
teur and second general average, 154 out of 180, 
shooting "Infallible." F. M. Eames, Philadelphia, Pa- 
second amateur and third general average, 151 out of 
180, shooting 'DuPont." A. L. Anmack, Vineland, N. 
J., third amateur, average, 146 out of 180, shooting 
"DuPont." 

Landsdale, Pa., Jan. 4.— L. J. Squier, first general 
average, 170 out of 180, shooting "DuPont;" W. H. 
Heer, second general average, 168 out of 180, shooting 
"New E. C. (Improved);" J. A. R. Elliott, third gen- 
eral average. 166 out of 180, shooting "New Schultze;" 
L. L. Swartz, Landsdale, Pa., first amateur, average, 
163 out of 180, shooting "New Schultze;" E. M. Lud- 
wick, Honeybrook, Pa., second amateur, average. 145 
out of 180, shooting "DuPont;" J. E. Pratt, Philadel- 
phia, third amateur, average, 144 out of 180, shooting 
"Infallible." 

Volo. 111., Jan. 9. — J. R. Graham. Ingleside, Vj, 
shooting "New E. C. (Improved)," first amateur and. 
tied for first general average with J. Boa, shooting 
"DuPont," 166 out of 190; F. C. Riehl, second general 
average, 165 out of 190, shooting "New E. C. (Im- 
proved);" L R. Barkley, Chicago, 111., second amateur 
and third general average, 162 out of 190, shooting 
'DuPont;" Mr. Ben Sterling, McHenry, 111., third ama- 
teur average, 159 out of 190, shooting "New E. C. 
(Improved)." 

Milton, Pa., Jan. 10. — H. C. Hirschy. first general 
average, 147 out of 150. shooting "DuPont;" W. H. 
Heer, second general average, 143 out of 150, shoot- 
ing 'New E. C. (Improved);" L. J. Squier, "third 
general average, 138 out of 150, shooting "DuPont;" 
C. H. Newcomb, Philadelphia, Pa., first amateur, aver- 
age, 131 out of 150, shooting "Infallible;" Fred. God- 
Pontchaiies, Milton, Pa., second amateur average, 
shooting "DuPont;" A. B. Longshore, Shamokin, Pa., 
third amateur average, shooting "Infallible." 



They Did it With a Parker. 

At the Grand Canadian Handicap held at Hamilton, 
Ont., Jan. 16 to 19, the "Old Reliable" Parker gun was 
much in evidence. 

Thos. Upton, winner of the live bird event, with a 
score of 34 out of 35, is an exceptional record at live 
birdss, and reflects credit upon the Parker gun. Live 
bird shooting is the most severe test of a shotgun, 
and this record Is particularly flattering to Parker 
Bros. 

The first, second and third amateur averages at 
inanimate targets were carried off by Parker guns 
in the hands of C. E. Doolittle, of Cleveland; Jay D. 
Green, Avon, N. Y., and H. D. Kirkover, Jr., of Buf- 
falo, respectively, showing that the Parker gun Is a 
winner in the hands of amateurs no matter where 
used. 



A Prominent New Yorker. 

J. Noah H. Slee, head of the manufacturing concern 
that manufactures and markets "3 In One" oil, has 
just been elected a member of the New York Cham- 
ber of Commerce. While Mr. Slee is a very busy man 
manufacturing "3 in One" oil. he still has time enough 
to be public spirited and progressive in the Interests 
of the community in which he lives and works, and 
the whole country as well. The sales of "3 In One" 
are Increasing every day at a faster rate than ever 
before. That Mr. Slee is in earnest in his desire to 
place ' 3 In One" in the hands of every sportsman and 
gun owner in the country Is certainly evidenced by 
the fact that they offer In all their advertising to 
send generous samples free of cost to anyone who 
asks. 



FEBRUARY 3, 1906 J 



11 




GUARANTEED STAKES! 



I EARLY 
J* CLOSING I 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

MEETING TO BE HELD IN AUGUST. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE MONDAY, APRIL 2, 06 

Only T-wo For Cent to Buter. 

CALIFORNIA STAKES $2000 For Trotters Eligible to 2:24 Class 

PACIFIC SLOPE STAKES 2000 For Pacers Eligible to 2:20 Class 

SUNSET STAKES 1000 For Free-for-All Trotters 

GOLDEN GATE STAKES 1000 For Pacers Eligible to 2:09 Class 

ENTRANCE DUE AS FOLLOWS: 2 per cent April 2, 1906; 1 per cent additional if not declared out by May 1, 1906; 1 percent additional if not declared 
out by June 1, 1906, <ind 1 per cent additional if not declared by July 2, 1906. 

Liberal Stakes for other classes will be announced later. Entry Blanks will be issued March 1st. 

F. W. KELLEY. Secretary, 36 Geary St., S. F. 



E. P. HEALD President. 



CUTTING AND CURING PORK. 



After killing and dressing, the hog 
should hang until thoroughly cooled. 
Operations are usually begun early in 
the morning, so as to have ample time 
to cool before night. 

There is a greater demand for bacon 
in this country than for salt pork, 
hence the sides of all hogs which are 
not overfat should be converted into 
bacon, says New York Farmer. For 
salt pork and fresh roasts the hog is 
first split along the back, the cuts of 
meat being removed from the loin and 
shoulder portions and the belly strips 
used for bacon. 

When bacon only is desired, the 
hams and shoulders are first removed 
after which the spare ribs are cut 
away. Bacon strips about three inches 
wide are cut around the body and 
these are cut in two. 

The hams and shoulders are cut 
short of the leg joint, well rounded and 
trimmed. Lean trimmings are made 
into sausage or head cheese. 

Choice lard is made from leaf lard 
and trimmings only, second-grade lard 
from gut fat, leaf lard and trimmings. 

The hams, shoulders and bacon are 
rubbed with salt and placed on edge 
in layers in a barret, which should 
have a layer of salt sprinkled over the 
bottom, 

For each 100 pounds of meat make 
a pickle of ten pounds of salt, two 
pounds of brown sugar, two ounces of 
saltpeter, one ounce of red pepper and 
from four to four and one-half gal- 
lons of water. 

Put these ingredients in an iron or 
tin vessel, place it over the fire and 
boil 10 or 15 minutes. Stir while boil- 
ing and remove the scum. After the 
hrine has cooled, pour it over the meat 
and let it remain from five to six 
weeks, then remove, drain and wipe 
the pieces, after which they are ready 
tor the smoke, which should last two 
or three weeks. 

The patent liquid smoke produces 
meat of a very good flavor. If cured 
in the old-fashioned way, the smoke 
should be kept up constantly, but the 
meat should not hang near enough to 
the flre to become heated. 

The smokehouse must be tight, and 
it Is safer to have a ground floor. The 
fire should be built In an iron pan near 
the middle of the building. If a red- 
hot iron is placed In the pan and the 
corncobs and chips placed over this, 
the smudge will start easily. An oc- 
casional piece of green wood adds to 
the smoke. 

After smoking, the hams shoulders 
and bacon pieces can be sewed up in 
muslin bags, which are whitewashed 
with lime and hung up In a dark, cool 
place. 

The salt pork is left in brine until 
used. It Is usually salted more than 
the hams, and should be placed in a 
separate barrel made from well sea- 
soned oak. A stone Is placed over the 
meat to keep It under the brine. 

In the spring the meat is removed 
and rinsed in clean water, and the 
barrel scalded. The brine Is boiled 
and the Impurities skimmed off. 

The pork is then put In the clean 
barrel and the brine poured over it. 
If this- precaution Is not taken, when 
warm weather approaches, the grease 
at the top of the brine will putrlfy and 



taint the meat. 



MOST COMMON DISEASE. 



Indigestion is the most common of 
all diseases among horses and mules. 
It is so often not visible, however, that 
the victim is termed sluggish or lazy 
without the real trouble being known, 
and the diseases progresses until the 
animal becomes worthless. The char- 
acteristics of the disease are much the 
same with all live stock, so the sug- 
gestion made here may be applied in 
a general way to any animal on the 
farm. 

The symptom are variable. The ap- 
petite may not be impaired. Sometimes 
it is capricious and perverted and 
again it continues good. In either case 
the victim is likely to lose flesh slowly 
but steadily. 

The bowels are generally irregular, 
the faces often coated with mucus and 
there may be great thirst and acid 
eructions. Abdominal pain is not in- 
frequent, especially, when the appetite 
remains unimpaired. The appetite is 
not only irregular, but in some cases 
is depressed. There is a disposition to 
eat unusual substances, such as wood, 
soiled bedding or other filthy matter. 

A healthy horse is the cleanest feed- 
er of all animals, but if affected with 
indigestion he may eat food that a hog 
would refuse. A common symptom is 
the passing of grain through the body 
whole and entirely undigested. The 
victim continues to lose flesh, the skin 
presents a hard, dry appearance and 
seems tight, or ' hide bound." 

As to treatment — 'the cause of the 
disease should be looked after care- 
fully and the diet promptly arranged. 
Commence with the food and regulate 
its quality, quantity and the intervals 
between feeding. 

See that the water supply is fresh 
and above all that it is given before 
feeding, for if taken after a meal it 
washes the contents of the stomach 
Into the bowels before they have been 
thoroughly prepared for their recep- 
tion. 

Endeavor to locate the trouble — 
whether it is in the stomach, intestines 
or annexed organs of digestion, as the 
liver, pancreas, etc. If the teeth are 
bad, attend to them. If sharp and Ir- 
regular, dress them and smooth them 
with a tooth rasp. If indigestion Is due 
to bolting the food, correct this by 
f eding In a large manger where the 
food can be spread out so that the 
animal must eat slowly. 

The bowels should be kept open by 
feeding soft foods, and when necessary, 
give such vegetable tonics as pulver- 
ized gentian In one or two teaspoonful 
doses mixed with pulverized quassia 
and bicarbonate of soda In the same 
sized doses. When acidity of the 
stomach is a marked symptom, such 
anticldes as pulverized chalk of sub- 
nitrate of bismuth may be administer- 
ed In half to tablespoonful doses. 



p 

To have careless milkers decreases 
the flow of milk. He who milks with 
thumb and finger Is a poor milker. 
The udder is very tender and needs 
gentle treatment. It should not be 
pulled hard nor Jerked. Firm, gentle 
manipulation will obtain the best re- 
sults. 



DAIRY NOTES. 

Statistics show that only one and 
one-half per cent of the cattle in Amer- 
ica have had the benefit of a reg- 
istered sire. 

A cow that shows she is a good 
milker or a good breeder when young, 
will probably continue to be such 
throughout her career. 

It is sometimes the case that cows 
that give the most milk xire the worst 
kickers. If they are really good it pays 
to work with them. 

Anyone contemplating the dairy bus- 
iness needs to consider well his loca- 
tion and his market, and get that 
breed which is best adapted to both. 

Salt should not be fed as a ration at 
stated times, as too much or too little 
will be given. They should have free, 
access to it whenever they want it. 

The calf that is not vigorous is not 
worth raising, and no time should be 
spent, nor food wasted, intrying to 
coax him along. He will be unsatis- 
factory when he is grown. 

First-class cows are money makers 
at almost any price. The $20 cow is 
almost sure to be a rapid money loser. 
She would be, even if she did not cost 
anything, but was a present. 

The modern process of selecting the 
best for breeding purposes, is a repeti- 
tion of the old law of the survival of 
the fittest being worked by man, in- 
stead of letting nature work it out her- 
self. 

As soon as a heifer calf is dropped 
it should be fed and trained with a 
view to making the very best cow pos- 
sible from the material that is in its 
little hide. That is, the object aimed 
ability for her to convert the largest 
amount of food into milk, richest with 
butter fat. It should not develop the 
predisposition to put on fat. Fat is 
antagonistic to making milk. 

A college professor is quoted as say- 
ing that a boy can be taught more 
good sound butter and cheese practice 
and doctrine in three months, at a 
good dairy school, than can be learned 
in ten months at regutar work. After 
a few years of experience as a dairy- 
man, many things will be understood 
which now seem strange. But then 
there will be other problems to handle 
which are unseen at first. It is an 
endless interesting study. 

There Is such a thing as a milking 
habit with cows. These are made by 
the one who trains them. The future 
value of the cow depends largely upon 
how she Is treated during her young 
COWhood. If at the time' she is so 
treated that she will give milk 10 to 
12 months or more, she will probably 
keep it up all her life. Carelessness 
along this line should be watched to 
avoid trouble and loss In the future. 

The stingy feeder cheats himself as 
well as hlsi cows; but, on the other 
hand, the dairy cow that will not re- 
pay generous feeding should be dls- 
p'aced at once. 

The best results come from heifers 
who come fresh at from 24 to 28 
months old. Some which are small 
and undeveloped may wait until older. 
To wait longer Is to lose time. 

When training calves they should be 
fed at regular Intervals. Not too much 
at a time. When we observe the course 
of nature — a little at a time and often 



— we are not far from the right 
method. 

Calves that are to become cows 
should not be fed much corn, as that 
has a tendency to put on fat. Wheat 
bran and oats are better, as these 
have a tendency to produce bone and 
muscle. 

Dairymen who try to be good to their 
calves often make them too fat by- 
overfeeding. They will not make the 
best cows. The milking qualities are 
impaired by developing a predisposi- 
tion to put on fat, before the time for 
milking comes. 

The term "pure bred" is thought to 
be deserved by the Island of Jersey, or 
Guernsey, because no outside breed 
has been used there for more than 250 
years except for beef. All registered 
cattle in these lines are imported di- 
rectly from their native islands. 

One of the best ways to develop the 
feeding capacity of the calf is to teach 
it to eat hay as soon as it will, and 
increase the amount as rapidly as pos- 
sible. Well cured hay Is a good ration 
by itself. But the calf should have 
some oats and bran besides. 



POULTRY POINTS. 

The only hens that it will pay to 
keep through the winter are the lay- 
ers. 

Pay little attention to' curing sick 
fowls, but study how to prevent dis- 
eases. 

Poultry droppings make the best fer- 
tilizer for the flower and vegetable 
ga rden. 

Meal fed to poultry should always be 
mixed with boiling- water, which par- 
tially cooks the food. 

The shape of the eggs has nothing to 
do with the life germ, unless the egg 
is deformed. 

'Eggs from fat hens do not hatch 
well and should there be any chicks 
they will be weak. 

The farm is the proper place to 
raise poultry profitably. Fowls, like 
sheep, will eat much waste grain and 
rid the farm of weed seed and will de- 
stroy millions of insect enemies. 

The feeding of a little charred corn 
twice a week will heip to brighten the 
combs and gloss the plumage. 

While giving egg-making constitu- 
ents, the farmer must not forget . to 
furnish material for shell-making as 
well. 

The three great factors In the winter 
production of eggs are cut bone or 
meat, green food In some shape, clover 
or roots, and exercise. 

Give the hens a variety of food in 
the winter for they soon begin to show 
the effects of the sameness of diet if 
they are fed on grain exclusively. 

Grit Is quite as necessary for the 
ducks as It is for the chickens, and 
the best way to supply them with It Is 
to put It in the drinking water. They 
like to "go fishing" for It. 



If OR SALK— O'Brien & Sons, side bar Pneu- 
1 matlo Buggy, In tine condition. Address, 
Buggy, Breeder and Sportsman. 



TfOR SALE — Bay mare, standard and regls- 
1 tered, good prospect for raco mare and One on 
the road. Address C, Breeder and Sportsman. 



(.February 3 IW6 



KENDALL'S SPAVIN CURE 



GREATEST MEAT SURPLUS 
COUNTRY, 



(Burea of Statistics, U. S. D. A.) 
' No other country produces so great 
a surplus of meat as the United States. 
During ihe year ending June 30, 1904, 
the exports of live meat animals and 
packing house products were valued at 
$217,000,000. No other country, except 
nearby Ireland, sends so many cattle 
to the English market. The exports of 
United States cattle to British ports 
during 1904 amounted to 387,000 head, 
valued at $36,000,000, and along with 
them were exported 223 000 sheep, 
worth nearly $2,000,000. 

Belgium has become an important 
'destination for United States cattle,.- 
and more than 18,000 were exported 
there during 1904. The cattle ship- 
ments to Cuba, which prior to 1898 
seldom reached ten head a year, 
amounted in 1904 to 135.000 head, val- 
ued at $2,000,000. 

Beef is exported from the United 
States chiefly in the form of fresh 
meat, and this is nearly all sent to 
British markets. This trade has in- 
creased while the exports of other 
kinds of beef have become less during 
the 15 years 1890-1904. The United 
States exported to the United King- 
dom 171,000,000 pounds of fresh beef 
in 1890 and 298,000.000 pounds in 1904. 
Trade in Eacon, Hams and Pickled 
Pork. 

The exports of bacon have declined 
since 1890. In that year 450,000,000 
pounds were shipped to the United 
Kingdom, 37,000,000 to Belgium, and 
12,000,000 to the Netherlands; while in 
1904 the quantity exported to the 
United Kingdom was only 197,000,000 
pounds, to Belgium 12,000,000, and to 
the Netherlands 2,000,0000 pounds. 

On the other hand, the exports of 
hams increased. In 1890 there were 
exported 65,000,000 pounds to the 
United Kingdom, and in 1904 the 
amount was 170,000 000 pounds. With 
some counties, however, there has been 
a recent decline. Shipments of hams 
to Germany increased from 1890 to 
1898, after which they declined greatly 
on account of restrictive legislation. 

Similarly, the exports of hams to 
Belgium, which in 1898 reached 16,- 
000,000 pounds, sdffered a decline after 
that year. Exports of salted and pickl- 
ed pork to the United Kingdom in- 
creased from 1890 to 1S98 and declined 
from 1899 to 1904. 

Extensive Market for Lard. 

Lard is not only the most valuable 
of the packing house products export- 
ed from the United States and worth 
even more than the cattle exported, 
but it reaches more markets in large 
quantities than do most other products 
of its class. Exports of this article to 
the United Kingdom increased from 
351 000,000 pounds in 1890 to 199,000,000 
in 1904; and the exports to Germany 
increased from 117,000,000 to 178,000,- 
000 pounds in the same time. 

Lard compounds have gained in im- 
portance among the exports until the 
quantity shipped in 1904 to Cuba 
reached 21,000,000 pounds, United 
Kingdom 11,000,000, Germany 7.000,000, 
and Belgium 5,000,000 pounds. Oleo- 
margarine is exported chiefly to Ger- 
many and the Netherlands, with 
smaller quantities to Norway, Cuba, 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, ana all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone u id otber bony tumors. 
Cures all ski.i diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria, Removes all 
Bunches from H rae a or Cattle, 

As a Human Remedy lor Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., It Is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balsam sold le 
Warranted to (rive Batlalartion. Price $1 60 
per bottle. Sold by drujrirlsts. or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for 
Its use. rSTSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. address 

•The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



British West Indies, Sweden and Bel- 
gium. The chlt.f markets for oleo t oil 
are the Netherlands and Germany, 4 he 
exports to those countries in 1901 !>>■- 
jng 99*000,000 .and '27,000,000 pouorvda, 
respectively. -. »%."' • s l> 



VITALITY OF THE COW. 



The "Australasian" is published 'a 
long way off, but the foKowing practi- 
cal suggestions which It puts forth re- 
garding the feeding of the dairy cow 
are as good for America as Australia: 

Boes the production of butter ex- 
haust the vitality of the cow and ren- 
der her less valuable for breeding pur- 
eposes, is a question which is exciting 
a gooil ilea! of attention In ^.various 
parts of the world. The assertion has 
been made that the extraordinary 
yields of butter "which certain dairy 
cows have produced are so extremely 
exhausting to the animals, that there 
is a loss of vigor both in the cow and 
her progeny. It is very questionable, 
however, if this assertion can be sup- 
ported by any well authenticated 
acts. • "it" 

It is commonly supposed that ani- 
mals can be forced to go beyond na- 
ture's limit by a system of high feed- 
ing; that hens can be -forced to lay 
large quantities of eggs, and cows to 
produce immense yields of milk. But 
unless drugs are used to cause abnor- 
mal activity of the organs of secre- 
tion, animals never exceed their nat- 
ural capacity. As a matter of fact 
very few come up to It, owing to the 
lack of intelligent feeding. So far from 
the vitality of cows being exhausted by 
a system of feeding which causes them 
to produce the largest amount of but- 
ter fat in a given period, it is the 
very animals which have most dis- 
tinguished themselves in the dairy 
that have produced the famous butter 
cows and bulls of succeeding genera- 
tions. The American cows which have 
yielded such enormous quantities of 
butter are also descended from ances- 
tors that have also been famous. A 
dairy cow is a very complex machine 
for converting food into milk, and, not- 
withstanding all that may be asserted 
to the contrary, the weight of evidence 
goes to show that in order to maintain 
the milk or butter producing powers for 
the greatest length of time and to ob- 
tain the most profit, the machine 
should be run at its fullest capacity. 
No farmer in this State need be afraid 
of injuring his cows, or impairing their 
constitutional vitality by feeding with 
a view to obtain the largest possible 
returns. 

Individual butter yields are of spec- 
ial interest to every owner of a dairy- 
herd, since they show the value of 
breeding on lines that are undoubtedly 
hereditary, and also emphasize the ne- 
cessity of feeding upon proper foods in 
suitable quantities so that the cows 
may be as productive and profitable as 
nature will permit. 



EXAS A. AND M. COLLEGE STU- 
DENTS AT CHICAGO. 



At the sixth International Live Stock 
Exposition, held in Chicago, Dec. 16 th 
to 23d, 1905, unusual interest was cen- 
tered in competition for the trophies 
awarded to the Agricultural College 
whose students proved themselves the 
best judges of stock. 

Thirty-five individuals took part In 
the contest, five each from the States 
of Iowa» Ohio, Michigan, Kansas, Mis- 
souri, Texas, and five from Ontario. 
Canada. 

When the results were published It 
was found that the students from 
Texas had drawn first honors in swine 
judging, out of 1500 points obtaining a 
score of 1229, while the Canadians were 
in second place with 12 points less. 

Ontario was first in sheep judging, 
Ohio in cattle and also in horses, with 
Ontario second and Texas third. 

The highest total score by any one 
individual from the seven colleges rep- 
resented was made by Mr. John Ash- 
ton of Texas, who obtained 831 out of 
a possible 1100 points, Bracken, an 
| Ontario student, being second with 12 
points less than Ashton. Two of the 
1904 stock judging team are now In 
lucrative positions 1 . Of the 1905 team 
three members who will graduate In 
June, will be in demand by some of 
the other Southern colleges which are 
giving particular attention to live stock 
matters. 

o 

Size and condition count for more In 
market than any particular shade or 

color. 

o — i 

Sponges— S. Adderley, 307 Market St. 



WORTH 
$900.00 TO THIS MAN. 

Newark, N. J., 12» 8th St. June 24, 1905."" 

DR. B. J. KENDALL CO., 
Dear SirB:— Please send me your horee book. I used yonr Kendall's Spavin Cur 
on a running colt with great success. He had a Ten small Jack spavin coming o u , 
but the party 1 bought him of could not see 1C I knew this was a good coll, also If I 
^ot lilrn that 1 could keep him on his pins by using Kendall's Spavin Cure. 1 bought him 
from that party for $100.00. lie used to be a trifle dickey on that one leg but just as soon as 
I began to apply the Spavin Cure he started to go Bound for me 1 started nimin a maiden race 
three weeksal'leraudhe just walked home with the purye. 1 started him five times after that 
and he. won all live races easy. I knew well what was ke.-plng the colt going sound butl never 
told anyone until I sold him. I sold him back to the same party again for one thousand dollars 
In a short while after as he kept trying to get him back. I then told him just what he must use 
on the colt if be wanted to win races with him. This party could hardly believe me, but he now 
knows the difference and thinks the world of your spavin Cure. THOttAS A. CASTLES. 
-Owner and trainer of thoroughbred race horses. 

Cures Curb. Spavin. Ringbone, Splint, 
And All Lameness. 



KENDALLS 
SPAVIN CURE 



Price $1; e lor $5. Greatest known liniment for 
family use. All d racists sell it. Accept no sub- 
stitute. Our prt-ftt book, "A Treatise on Ihe 
Horse.'* free from druggists or 

Dr. B. J. Kendall Co., 

Enosburg Falls, Vermont. 





5^ 



\TakeittM 

I , If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
act promptly, you will And that there is nothing in 
I the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, Windpuffs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 

I It has saved thousands of good horses from the peddler's 
- cart and the broken-down norse market. Mr. C. H. Dick- 
ens, of Minneapolis, Minn., who conducts one of the largest livery stables in the Northwest, 
I writes a? follows: I have been using Qulnn's Ointment Tor some time and with the greatest 
success. I take pleasure in recommending it to my friends. No horseman should be with- 
out it in his stable. For curbs, splints, spavins, windpuffs and all bunches it has no equal." 
Price $ 1 .00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mail. Write us for circulars, 

rrleTor the 'a-kf;g 8ent W. Bm Eddy & Co., Whitehall, M. Y. 




FIRST PRIZE BUTTER. 



Mrs. L. A. Sweet, of Fairmount, 
Minn., secured first prize on dairy but- 
ter at the recent convention of the 
Minnesota State Dairymen. The fol- 
lowing description of the methods of 
handling milk on the farm and the 
way in which the butter is made is of 
interest: 

All the cans, milk pails, strainers, 
separator, and every utensil used in 
the manufacture of butter is kept 
thoroughly cleansed by the use of a 
brush and Wyandotte's cleansing 
powder. First, having throughly 
rinsed the utensils with warm water, 
they are washed with luke-warm wa- 
ter, useing the brush and cleansing 
powder, and are finally thoroughly 
scalded with boiling water — at a tem- 
perature of 212 degrees. Then they 
are placed in the sunlight so that the 
d'rect rays can reach the inside of each 
utensil. 

The cows are fed a good quality of 
ensilage and corn fodder, about 28 to 
32 pounds of the former and seven 
pounds of the latter daily, together 
with a mixture of five quarts of wheat 
bran, four parts fine ground corn meal 
and one part oil cake meal. Each cow 
is fed two-fifths the number of pounds 
of this concentrated feed that she gives 
pounds of milk. The cow stables are 
aired, the cows are carefully brushed 
before milking and are -kept In a 
cleanly condition at all times. 

The milk is strained through a 
strainer consisting of a wire gauze and 
one thickness of muslin. As soon as 
milked it is taken from the barn to 
the milk room, which is wholly separ- 
ated from the barn and run through 
the separator at once, the cream being 
placed in a shotgun can. This can is 
immediately set in ice cold water. As 
soon as it is thoroughly cooled It is 
poured into the storage can and tightly 
covered. 

When two days' cream is obtained, 
twenty-four hours before churning it, 
five gallons of 35 per cent cream is 
heated to a temperature of 70 degrees, 
to which is added two quarts of good 
c mmercial starter. (Butter-milk was 
used with the State Convention butter 
because the commercial starter made 
was not as good as had been expect- 
ed.) The cream and starter are mixed 
thoroughly and then, allowed to stand 
for twelve hours at about the same 
temperature, cooled to about sixty de- 
grees and let stand for twelve hours, 
churning at about 60 degrees. 

O 

Dry-picking is always to be prefer- 
red when preparing turkeys for mar- 
ket. When in fine condition, nicely 
picked, and sent to market without 
having been packed in ice, a turkey is 
at its best and commands the highest 
price. 



High Class Team For Sale 

T) RIGHT BAYS; WEIGH 1100 LBS. EACH; 16 
" hands high; well bred; Wilkes stock; well 
broken, gentle, kind deposition; absolutely 
soun J; 6 years old, and a very desirable team In 
every respect. Can be seen at the Hulda Stables, 
1530 Fell St , San Franoisco. 



WILLIAM HAROLD 2:131 FOR SALE 

THE MEEK ESTATE HAVING BEEN PA R- 
J tltioned, and the breeding of horses discon- 
tinued, the stallion WILLIAM HAROLD 2: 13'^ 
is ottered for sale or lease to a responsible party. 
William Harold is by Sidney 3:19%, and his dam 
is Cricket 2:10 by Steiuway. Cricket Is one of 
the great producing mares of California, being 
already the dam of fife In the Hst and has three 
more foals that will be given records. William 
Harold has had the most limited opportunities 'n 
the stud, yet is the sire of Janice 2:08x trotting, 
Dan Hums 2:15 and Judith 2:25 and several others 
in the list. He Is In excellent condition, and as 
his get are all large, well made and nicely turned 
horses he should be a good money earner In the 
stud if in good hands. Apply to or address 

H. W. MBEK, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



STALLION TO LEASE 

To some competent horsemen that can furnish 
himself and take in charge 

EDWARD B. by STAM B. 

dam by Dexter Prince, to take the route between 
Rio Vista and Courtland and vicinity of D S. 
Mathews' home ranch on Grand Island. The 
horse Is In good condition and ready for work. 
It the route Isn't satisfactory another can be 
chosen. For further particular* write to 

D. S. MATTHEWS, Ryde, Cal. 



A GOOD MARE FOR SALE. 

By CLIPPER 2:06, dam by AMEKO JR. 

- YEARS OLD, TROTS OR PACES; HAND- 
' some, sound and a high-class animal In every 
respect An Al roadster and will make a race 
horse or a valuable brood mare. Reason for sell- 
ing is that I have no time to devote to handling 
her. Call or address 

Phone: GEO. C. PETERMAN, 

Oakland 6501. 779 Twelfth St., Oakland, Cal. 



Norman Stallion For Sale. 

1AARK IRON GRAY NORMAN STALLION; 
J- 7 weighs about 1600; 16 hands high; 4 years old. 
Is blocklly built and a sure foal getter. Colts 
can be seen at San Jose. For further particulars 
address W. H. WILLIAMS, 

1120 Alameda Ave., San Jose, Cal. 



TheyLicKlim 

As they wi\nt it 

COMPRESSED 

PURE-SALT BRICKS 
in PATENT FEEDERS. 

The sane, economical, handy 
way of salting animals. 

AsH Dealers. 
Write un for Book. 

BflMONlME5lMY(0 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS ■ BROOKLYN. N.Y 




February 3, 19t6J 



13 



*CJ^ Registered U S. Patent Ottice 

SPAVIN CURE 




THOftOUCMPIN 
CAPPCO "OCX 



tf/MO Purr 



CfffASf Mffl 



The fire iron Is unoertain; blistering is less 
fffective and both necessitate laying up the 
horse trom weeks to many months; mercurial and 
polsonoas compounds produce irreparable injury. 
"Save-the-Horse" eliminates all these factors. 

Scores of letter* to 1 „ d f<Jr cop | 
coBflrm and convince) 

Absolute and overwhelming evidenoe and cer- 
tainties as to the unfailing power of "Save-the- 

H °"ave-the-Horse" Permanently Cares 
Spavin, Ringbone (except low Ringbone), Curb, 
Thoroughpin, Splint, Shoe Boil, Wind Puff, In- 
jured Tendons and all lameness without scar or 
loss of hair. Horse may work as usual. 
*r nn per bottle. Written guarantee— as 
JO iUU binding to protect you as the best legal 
talent oould make it. Send for copy and booklet. 
At Druggist* and Dealers or Express Paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL CO. 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y., Formerly Troy, N- Y. 

D. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 
619 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Strathway 2:19 For Sale. 

gIRE OF 



Toggles 


2:08/, 


John Caldwell 


2:08'/ 2 


Getaway 


.., 2:12* 


HOMEWARD 


. ..2:13', 


(sire of Geo. G. 


2:05*) 




....2:12'/, 




2:13 




....»:14M 



etc., etc. 

STRATH WAY is by that great sire, Steinway, 
and out of the great broodmare Countess (dam of 
Dawn 2:18*0 by Whipple's Hambletonian. 

He is a strong, vigorous horse, and out of all 
the mares bred to him during the past two years 
every one proved to be in foal. He will be sold 
very reasonable, as his owner is selling all his 
trottlng-bred stock and retiring from breeding. 

For price and further particulars address 
GRAHAM E. BABCOCK, 
San Diego, Cal. 

BROOD MARES FOR SALE. 



EVELINE by Nutwood 600 
NELLIE FAIRMONT 



j All safe 
by ra.r ra „nt f Ly ^oaUO w 

ALAMEDA MAID by Eros j 

EVELINE (registered) is dam of Ole2:10!4, Tie 
tarn 2:19, Maud Fowler 2:21% and Roblet 2:12, 
the dam of Bonalet 2:09H, champion three- 
year-old pacing filly. 

NELLIE FAIRMONT, dam of Zambra, world's 
champion for 5 miles, 12:24 

ALAMEDA MAID (registered) is out of Oakland 
Maid 2:22 by Speculation. 
For prices and particulars address 

S. B. WRIGHT, Santa Rosa, Cal. 



The Perfectly Galted Trotting Stallion 

ALTA VELA 2:11 14 

(Reg. No. 22449) 

Sir., ELECTIONEER, sire of 166 in 2:30 and 
grandsire of Major Delmar 1:59%. 

Dam. LOKITA 2:18V, (dam of Alta Vela 2:11* 
and Palorl2:24*> by Piedmont 2:1?*; second 
rim, Lady Lowell (dam of Lady well 2:16V4 
and Lorlta 2:l8'/i) by St. Clair; third dam, 
Laura, dam of Doe, sire of Occident 2:16%. 
Address all communications to BREEDER 

AND SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary St., San Franoisoo. 



Deposit Tour 
Idle Funds 



FOB SALE. 

A FIVE-YEAR-OLD COLT, 14.2 hands high; 

weighs 1060 pounds; bright sorrel In color; 
perfectly sound and can run a quarter of a mile 
In 23 seconds or better. He Is one of the most 
beautiful and best bred sprinters In the State. 
Suitable for a polo pony. Will sell at a reason- 
able price. Address 

SOL SHOCKLEY, Merced, 



674-680 Uth Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1BBELL & SON, Proprietor!. 

San Francisco, Cax. 

Boarding, Training and Handling all kinds 
Fanoy Horses. A few Nice Rigs on hand. Ti r ; 
any oar going to the Chute*. Tel.: West 269 



WITH THE 



Central Trust Company 
of California 

42 Montgomery St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



You can open a Savings Account 
by mail with any sum 
large or small. 

INTEREST PAID SEMI-ANNUALLY 

3 1-4% on Ordinary Savings 
3 6-10% on Term Savings 

■end for Booklet, 
"THE SURE WAY TO WEALTH." 



FOR SALE OR LEASE, 

Two Prince Airlie Stallions. 

PORTOLA 37413, a handsome golden bay. 7 
years old, 16 hands, weighs 1190 lbs. 

MENLO BOY 37401, a magnificent brown with 
white points, 6jearsold, 16.1 hands, weighs 
1200 lbs. 

These t«vo horses are full brothers being sired 
by Prince Airlie 28045; he by Guy Wilkes 2:15^, 
sire of Fred Khol 2:07%. Hulrta 2:08!4, Seymour 
Wilkes 2:08^: first dam Signal by Del Sur 2:24; 
seoond dam Lady Signal 2:35'/4 by Signal 3327. 
Both of these horses are very fast for the amount 
of worn, being only a few months last year, show- 
ing quarters around :34 and :35. 

For further information apply to 

P. H. McEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St., San Francisco. 



ABSORBINE 

Removes the inflammation and 
Bunch. Restores the. Circulation 
in any Bruise oxTliirkencd Tissue, 
without Mistering, removing the 
hair or laving horse up. Pleasantto 
n>e. clean and odorless. S2 110 per 
bottle delivered. Book No. 1 free. 

ABSORBINE, JR., for mankind, 

Sl.lKr Bottle. Cures Bunions, 
Corns, Chilblains, Sprains, Etc.. 
quickly. Genuine manufactured 
only by 



W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

54 Monmouth Street. Springfield, Mass. 

For sale by Mack&Co Langiey &MlchaelsCo. 
aldington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Franoisoo 




TRAINING AND BOARDING STABLES 

DEVISADEKO AND FULTON 8T8. 
(1408 Fulton 8ireet) 

Horses Called For, Clipped and Delivered 

AT POPULAR PRICES. 

BUSINESS HOKSES FOB DIRK. 

I have opened a new Boarding aDd Training 
Stable naarthe above corner, and will board and 
train for racing, road use or matinee driving, a 
limited number of first class horses at reasonable 
rates Have good location. brand-Dew stable and 
everything first-class All horses In my oare will 
receive the best of attention. 

Phone: Park 573. T. C. CABNEY. 



JACK FOR SALE. 

A BLACK JACK WITH LIGHT POINTS 
- ' large, heavy booed, prompt and a gooa han 
dler. Is a good foal getter and bis foals are 
excellent Individuals. Price very reasonable for 
prompt sale. Address for further particulars, 
8. B. WRIGHT, Santa Rosa. 



Toghill Stud 



(Property; of Stephen' T. Britten) 



SQUIRE 

OF 
CHESTER 




Blue 
Roan 



THE LATEST IMPORTED ENGLISH HACKNEY 

SQUIRE OF CHESTER 

A few engagements m&y be booked{for high-class, well-bred mares. 

WILLIAM WALKER. Manager, Menlo Park, Cal. 



Reg. No 
31706 



MONTEREY 2:09 1-4 

(Sire of IRISH »:«*',, Fattest Four- Year-Old Pacer of 1904). 

By SIDNEY (grandsire of Lou Dillon l:58'/i); dam, HATTIE (also dam of Montana 2:16) by 
Commodore Be mont 4340 MONTEREY 2:09>j stands 15 3 hands, weighs 1200 lbs. and Is one of the 
finest individuals on this Coast. FEE, S50 for the Season. 

\# f\ O C RJI I 1" C »y MONTEREY 3:09^ 

TV/WU IVI I I EL Dam, LEAF YEAR 2:V5(i (full sister to Iago 2:11) by Tempest 1881, 

son of Almont 33. 

YOSEMITE is a very high-class young trottor, and as he will be trained this year he will be 
allowed to serve only six choice bred mares FEE, B'tB for the Season. 

Will make the Season at SAN LORENZO and ALAMEDA. 

I have leased a flue, roomy barn with 14 large box stalls on Sherman street, four blocks from the 
racetrack, Alameda, and am prepared to do public tra'ning. Would like to get two good trotters 
and a promising three-year-old to pr pare for the races this season. 

For particulars call or address 

PETER J. WILLIAMS, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



R. AMBUSH 



41840 

Rec. (3) 2:14 j 



SEASON 1906. 



FEE $30. 



At ASSOCIATION PARK, 2 miles east 

of San Bernardino. 
Address g. W. BONNELL, Redlands. 



Crabbet Arabian Stud 



SUSSEX, ENGLAND. 



CRABBET PARK. THREE BRIDGES,] 
and 

NEW BUILDINGS, SOUTH WATER. 

The largest breeding stud of Arabian horses in the world. The conditions under which these 
horses are bred at Newbuildings produce a type unrivalled for quality and hardiness The unique 
knowledge of the breed gained by the owners in Arabia enables them to guarantee purity of blood of 
the choicest strains, some of which are now extinct in the East. Stallions and mares constantly 
supplied to breeders throughout the Colonies and on the Continent. A few mares suitable for polo, 
hacks and quiet in harness generally for sale. For further particulars address 

GUY CARLETON, Man ger, Carpenters, Southwater, Sussex, England. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



3 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty reoognlze the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, ohandellers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING BOOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Looation in the City— all add much to the ever Increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



VICTOR VERILHAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. McGRATII 

Manager 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Oor. of Grove and Baker Streets, Just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 

(Tako Hayos, McAllister or Uovlsadero Street Cars) 

Best looated and healthiest Stable In San Franclsoo. Always a good roadster on hand for 
sal/i. Careful and experienced mon to oare for and exerolso park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track uso. Ladles oan go and return to stablo d not have their horses frlghtenod by automobiles 
^r cars 

Distemper Losses Stopped. 

Distemper, epizootic etc., always Involves Immediate and often permanent 
loss. 

Why not bo prepared to euro every case promptly? 

Dn CRAFT'S DISTEMPER & COUGH CURE will do it- no cost if it 
falls. Used by 200,010 stock owners. If your druggist hasn't It, orderdlreot. 
Prlco 50c and $1 Let us send you our Instructive booklet, "Veterinary 
Pointers." Free. 

WELLS MEDICINE CO, , Chemists & Germologists, 1 3 Third St., Lafayette, Ind 

D E NEWELL. General Agent for Pacific Coast ft 1 9 Mission St., Han Franrlsco. Cal 

THOMPSON'S SALE AND TRAINING STABLES 

PLEASANTON RACE TRACK 

One of the Best Equipped Training Stables in California. 

Owners desiring to have horses handled and put In condition for sale or racing are invited to 
correspond with the undersigned. 

JAS. THOMPSON, Pleasanton, Cal. 




l February :j, ]£06 




THE BAYWOOD STU VLtfiTSSu Anci™ S ° N 

THE BUNGALOW.SAN MATEO, CAL. j #111 If V I I I *| 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) # I, B ^ % | M - H 1 14 

Imp. Hackney Stallion r WfcWW " blVW 

„„_„_ „. Great Race Horse and Producing Sire, 

GREEN'S RUFUS 63 <" 9 » 

will serve a limited number of Approved Mares, Season 1906 

FEE - - - $75 

Reductions made f r two or more mares. 

Manager, WALTER SHALT. - 



THE CHAMPION SIRE OF EARLY AND EXTREME SPEED 

r Sire GUY WILKES 3:16* 



NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16 



21 



Dam LI DA W «:1»5< 

by NDTWOOD.........SS:18* 

N D TWOOD WILKES 23116 is the only stallion 
that ever produced two three-year-olds in ore season 
with recordsol 8:13 and 3:13^ respectively. Who 
Is It 3: 13, ez-ohamplon three-year-old gelding of the 
world, reduced h's record to 2:10*. John A Me 
Kerron Mil : -.mv, as a three-year-old) Is the fast 
est trotter of all the famous tribe of George Wilkes 

NUTWOOD WILKES Is the sire of John A Mo 
Kerron 2:044 (sire 3 two-year-olds In 2:30 list), Tidal 
Wave 2:09, Miss Idaho 2:09*. Who Is It 2:10M, Stanton 
Wilkes 2:104, Cresoo Wilkes (4) 2: 10*, Georgle B 
2:12!*, Claudius (4) 2:13'/,, North Star (3) 2:134, Bob 
Ingersoll (4) 2:14%, and 32 in 2:30 list. 

His sons Nearest and Stanton Wilkes have sired 
Alone (4) 2:09* and Cavallero 2:09*. 

His daughters produced Miss Georgle 1:W Z X Mona 
Wilkes (3) 2:114, Lady Mowry (4) 2:12*, Caroline L. 
2:14* Hollo 2:15. 

NUTWOOD WILKES will make the Season of 
1906 at the 

NUTWOOD STOCK FARM, from Feb. 1st to July 1st. 

Fpp (^0 for the SEASON, with the usual return privileges If horse remain! my property, 
rcc $o\t Good pasturage at $.1 per month. Bills payable before removal of mare. Stock well 
cared for, but no responsibility assumed for accidents or escapes. 

Young Stock by NUTWOOD WILKES for sale. 

Send for Tabulated Pedigree For further particulars apply or address 

MARTIN CARTER, Nutwood Stock Farm, Irvinjlon, Alameda Co., Cal. 




Ambush (3) 


2:I4i 


Delilah (3) 


2:14| 


Bystander 


2:I4| 


Sherlock Holmes 


2:15] 


Dixie S 


2:27 


Conchita 


2:29 



Has 10 Three-Year-Olda that worked 
trials In 1900 »• follows: LILIAN 
ZOLOCK 3:14, KINNKT WOOD 3:15 
CLKOPATRA 8:10. RED LOOK 8:18 
ZOLLIE 8:18. IN AUGUR ETTA 3:38' 
HYLOCK 3:86, MAJELLA 3:26, ADA ' 
L ANTE 3:36. KOLOCK 8:37. and 3 
Two-Year-Olds a> follows: WENZA 
3:24, BONNIE JUNE 3:27. ISALCO 
2:30, and 13 others now In training 
that ean show quarters In from 33 to 
36 seconds 




NUSHAGAK 25939 

Sire of ARISTO 2:08*, winner of Occident and Stanford Stakes of 1903. 

Sired by SABLE WILKES 2:18. sire of 42 In 2:30; dam. FIDELIA (dam of Fldette 2:284, dam of 
Mary Celeste 2:17*1 bv Director 2:17; second dam by Reavls Blackbird 2:22; grandam by Lancet, son 
of McCracken's Blackhawk. 

Fee 860, limited to forty outside mares. 

2-Yea.r-Old Record 
21201 

Sired by DEXTER PRINCE (sire of Eleata 2:08*, Lisoi jero 2:08*, James L. 2:09*, Edith 2:10, 
etc); dam, WOODFLOWER (dam of Seyles2:l5*) by Ansel 2:20, son of Electioneer; second dam, 
Mayflower 2:304 (dam of Manzanita 2:16, Wildfiower (2) 2:21, and eight producing daughters) by 
St Clair 18675. Fee »30. 

Both Stallions will make the Seaeon or 1906 at Race Track, Woodland, Cal 

C. A SPENCER, Manager, Woodland, Cal. 

ALEX BROWN, Owner, Walnut Grove, Cal. 



Prince Ansel 



J\. High- Glass Young MoKinney 

GENERAL J. B. FRISBIE 41637 

A handsome son of McKlnney. Sired by the great McKlnney 2:11*, greatest sire of the age; 
dam, the great broodmare Daisy S (dam of Tom Smith 2:18*. General Vallejo 2:224 Little Mao (3) 
2:27, and Sweet Roste 2:28* I by McDonald Chief 3583. son of Clark Chief 89; second dam, Fanny Rose, 
great broodmare (dam of George Washington 2:16*, Columbus S. 2:17) by Ethan Allen Jr 2993 
GENERAL J. B FRISBIE Is a handsome, good-gal ted blaok, Ave years old. He Is a full brother 
to Tom Smith 2:13*; shows McKlnney speed and will be trained for the races this season. 

Terms, S36 for the Season; usual return privileges. 

MAMBRINO CHIEF JR. 11622 

Sire of Doli'cau 2:154, George Washington 2:10* (sire of Stella 2:154, Campaigner 2:28* and 
Prlnoess W 2:29*), Trilby 2:21 * and Sweet Rosle2:28*. By McDonald Chief 3583 (sire of 4 and sire 
of dams of 7 in 2:30); dam. Venus by Mambrlno Patcben 58. 

Terms, S30 for the Season: nsual return privileges, 
Good pasturage $3 per month. 
Both of the above THOMAS SMITH, 

Horses at my barn. 1031 Georgia St., Vallejo, Cal, 



More Standard Performers Than Any Other SIDNEY Stallion in California. 

By SIDNEY 2:19 3-4 

(sire of 19 In 2: is list and 106 
In 2:30 list and sire Sidney 
Dillon, sire LOU DILLON 
1:584, World's Champion); 

dam Mamie Harney 

by The Grand Moor; next 
dam Sarpy Mare by Echo 

462. 



SIDMOOR 2:17 



3 
4 



SlHE OF 

ENOCH i . 1 2 GENERAL .Ml, TEDDY 
THE KOAN 2:174, LITTLE MISS 2:17*. 
MARCHIONESS 2:89. LILLIAN MDMORE 
2:244 and TIP OODANDO (trial) 2:09>/,. 
SID ABBOTT (trial) 2:18, JAKE F, (trial 
half mile) l:OS. 



Season 1906 at Concord 

Fee $30 for Season. 

Usual Return Privileges. 



SIDMOOR 2:17* Is a dark bay stallion 
and a grand individual in every respeot. 
He is one of the best produoing sons of 
Sidney, and with the right cross will get 
Lou Dillon speed, 



Race TracK and at Pacheco. 

Address 

JOHN OH, Pacheco, Cal. 



CONSTRUCTOR 39569 

By McKINNEY 2:111, Dam and Grandam Great Brood Mares. 

full Brother to tom smith 2.131-4 

„ F'fflSSiP^X S ' , ( „ d o m . of . T,?™ Smlth 2:13 *' General Vallejo 2:20*. Little Mac 2:27*. Sweet 
Roste 2:28*) by McDonald Chief 3o83; second dam Fanny Rose (dam of Columbus S. 2- 17 George 
Washington 2:16*, who sired Stella 2: 15*, Campaigner 2:26*, etc , and Fanny, dam of Scotty 2:iaS[. 
Trilby 2:21*, etc.). CONSTRUCTOR is one of the handsomest sons of the great McKlnney on the 
Cjast. He stands 15 hands 2* inches over the witheraand 15 hands 3* inches over the loins and 
weigh' ' 1 100 pounds. He never made a regular season in the stud, but was bred to several mares 
when three years old and all of his get are of good size and good lookers. 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at Thomas Smith's Barn, Vallejo, Cal. 
Service Fee $25, with usuaj return privilege. 

For further particulars address 

JAS. A. SMITH, 1021 Georgia St., Vallejo, Cal. 



ZOLOCK S Sire is the Oreat McKINNEY 2:11 1-4 
His Dam is the great broodmare GAZELLE 2:11 1-2 




. o z °LO c K stands 16 hands, la a beautiful brown and a horse of grand proportions. Allhlsooits 
are good-headed, and there has never been one that went lame. 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Terms for the Season, $75. ^'°JL^*V' v ° b J n .* r7 , ut " nd ends Jnne 1 "- 

. . '**"'"» ww Mares will be cared for in any manner desired but 
no responsibility for accidents or escapes. * uesireu, out 



Also, the Three- Year-Old Stallion 

ISALCO 



by ZOLOCK s on ,; dam GIPSKY. dam of Gazelle 
2:114. Delilah 2:144 and three more in the list. Isalco 
is a full brother to Delilah (3) 2:144. 

Terms for the Season $25 

HENRY DELANEY, 
Race Track. San Jose. Cal. 

BONNIE DIRECT (4) 3:00, 

SIRE OF 

HON ALET (3) 3:OlH t , In winning; race-World's Record for age and sex. 
BON NIK ME (3), trial (trotting) 9:11% (last half 1:03), 

Only two of BONNIE DIRECT'S first orop prepared to race. 

Season of 1906 at Pleasanton-Fee $100 

USUAL RETURN PRIVILEGE. Should horse die or be sold, service fee 
for mares not proving to be in foal will be returned. 

The facilities for care of mare or mares and foals is unsurpassed. 
Pasturage, $1.25 per week. Feeding and pasturing, $2 50 per week. 
Separate paddocks and stalls if desired. 

A good runway for yearlings, including green feed, hay, grain, twice a day, 
and good shelter at night, $15 per month. 

Mares will be fed until pasturage is sufficient to keep them in good condition. 
Running water in all paddocks and fields. 



Dfl 



E. G. MCCON NELL 

705 SUTTER ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



L. GRIFFITH, 
PLEASANTON, CAL. 



WORLD'S CHAMPION RACE HORSE 

SEASON OF 1906 AT PLEASANTON 

CTAD DR. KITED I CO I worlds record made in m. 

OlAK rUmlLn 1.334 Th,F s.r.'H?rr T : d r ^^ 

„. . (MORNING STAR 8:03, JOE POINTER 2:05*, 
oire or; (SIDNKT POINTER 2:07*. SCHLEY POINTER 2:08*, etc. 



Sire BROWN HAL 2:12 1-2 by Tom Hal Jr. 

Sire of 

Star Pointer 1:59* 

Hal Ulllard 2:04* 

Star Hal 2:04* 

Hal Cnaffln 2:05* 

Elastic Pointer 2:06% 

New Richmond 2:07* 

Hal Braden 2:07* 

Storm .2:084 

Brown Heels 2:09* 

Laurel 2:09 * 

Silver Hat 2:10 

etc 

6 produoing sons, 2 produoing daughters 



Dam SWEEPSTAKES by Snow Heels 

Dam of 

Star Pointer 1:59* 

Hal Pointer 2:04 

Elastic Pointer 2:064 

Cloud Pointer 2:24* 

Tennessee Pointer 2:24* 

2 producing sons 

6 produoing daughters 



Service Fee 



$100 



With Usual Return Privilege 



CHAS. De RYDER. Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 



Get the Blood that Produced the Champions, SWEET MARIE 
and LOU DILLON, by Breeding to 



GRECO 



BLACK COLT, FOALED 
1900. Sire, McKINNEY 
2:11*, lire of SWEET 
MARIE 2:04*, Kinney 
Lou 2:07*. Charley Mac 
2:07*, Hazel Kinney 2:09*. Th? Roman 2:09%. Dr. Book 2:10. Coney 
2:02, China Maid 2:06*. You Bet 2:07. Jennie Mao 2:09. Zolock2:(j5M 
Dam, AILEEN 2:264 (dam of Mowitza 2:204, Sister 2:20 and 
GRECO 2:32, trial 2:20) by Anteeo 2:164, sire of dams of Directum 
Kelly 2:08*, Grey Gem 2:094. W. Wood 2:07, etc. 

Grandam, LOU MILTON (dam of LOU DILLON 1:584. Red- 
wood 2:114, Ethel Mack 2:25 and Alleen 2:264) by Milton Medium 
2:254 (sire of 2 and dams of 5) by Happy Medium 2:324, sire of | 
Nancy Hanks 2:04, eto. 

GRECO is a handsome black stallion and a natural and fast trotter. He won his only race as a 
colt, and has shown miles In 2:20 since in bis work, and is a sure 2:10 trotter. He will be permitted to 
serve a limited number of mares e,t ajioo THIS SEASON. Correspondence solicited. Address 

CHA8. De RYDER, Manager, Pleasanton, Cal. 




IRAN 



A I T n 24586 Sire, PALO ALTO 2:08 3=4 
L I U Rec. 2:121 Dam, ELAINE (4) 2:20 



IRAN ALTO'S sire and dam have both held champion trotting records and his dam and gran- 
dam both produced a oolt that was a world's record breaker, and his grandsire has sired several 
trotters that broke world's records No other horse with a reoord as fast as IRAN ALTO'S oan 
claim thii. At nine years he had sired ten colts, four of them with records as follows: Dr. Frasse 
2: 124. Thomas R. 2:15. Vendome2:17, Dr. Frasse's Sister 2:25— all at four years old. Who oan name 
a horse whose first ten colts oan beat that? 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at ".WOODLAND, OA I. 
Fee $40 For further particulars address 

J20 due when mare Is bred and H. 8. HOOOBOOH, 

|20 payable when mare Is known to be in foal. Woodland, CaJ 



February 3, 1906] 



15 



DUCK SHOOTERS! CAMPBELLS 

QUESTION-=-Wby is it that so many excellent wing 

shots cripple fine birds? 
ANSWER— Because they don't use 

BALLISTITE 

which never fails to kill clean. 
REMEMBER- -One (I) dead bird in the pocket is 
worth two (2) in the tule. 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANG-LES SACRAMENTO 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



EMOLLIO 
IODOFORM 



GALL CURE 






For GALL, BACKS and SHOULDERS. CRUT PKK 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS ihere Is none 
superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRECUTS C A LKS.. SCRATCH- 
ES, BLOOD POISONED SORES and A BRAS IONS 
OF THE SKIN it has no equal. 

It Is very adhesive and easily applied to a watery 
as well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON- 
ING. In this respect there is no Gall Cure offerf d 
which can justly eien claim to be a compeiltor. 
We placed it on the market relying wholly on Its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact thai 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising, the sales of 1900 were UKlper cent great- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This increase wasontlrely due to it- 
MERITS, and from It we feel just' fled Insavlngthat 
UisTHE GALL CURE OF THE20TH CENTURY; 

It is a quick and sure cure for those troublesome 
skin cracks under the fetlock which Id jure and often 
lay up race horses. 

All Trainers Should Have It la Their Stables. 



PRICE:— 3 OZ. BOX. 25o ; 1 LU. UOX. * I OO. 
Read our "ad" on Campbell's Horse Fool Remedy in; next issue of this paper. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs., 412 W.Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If.not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for it. 



NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




We Make 16 urades, $17.75 to $300. Write for ART CATALOG to 

THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

?„ r Coast Branch, PHIL B, BEKEART CO.. 114 Second St., San Francisco 

SMITH HAMMERLESS EJECTOR GUNS 

also ^(K win 

Gold Medal 

at the 

LEWIS & CLARK 
EXPOSITION 



HUNTER 

ONE-TRIGGER 




HUNTER A J- MS CO., FULTON, NEW YORK 



First, Second and Third 
High Amateur 
Averages 



WON BY 



THE 



Parker Gun 




Grand Canadian Handicap live bird event woo by tbe Parker Gun in the 
bands of Thos Upton, with score of 34 out of 35. In the amateur class the 
three high averages at targets were carried off by C. E. Doollttle. Jay D. 
Green and H. D Kirkover Jr , all using the Parker Gun. Tbe Parker was 
much in evidenoe at the Hamilton, Ont , shoot, Jan 16 to 19. The Parker gun Is always In evldenoe, 
and if you would improve your score you should shoot no other. The only absolutely reliable gun in 
the world. 



N. Y. Salesrooms: 32 Warren St, 



30 Cherry St., Meriden, Conn. 



SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 

739 
Market St. 

Send for 
Catalogue 

GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 

SAN FRANCISCO, • • • CALIFORNIA. 




521 
Kearny St. 

GXD 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



STALLION OWNER! 

If You Need a Stallion Card or Stock Catalogue Compiled and Printed, Stallion roster, 
Stallion Service Book, a Cut of Your Horse, a Horse Hook of any kind or a Tabulated 
Pedigree, Get it where you can get the CHEAPEST and BEST. 

FOR SAMPLES AND PKICKS ADDHKSS 

MAGNVS FLAWS &. CO., 358 Dearborn St., CHICAGO ILL. 

THE HORSEMAN'S HANDBOOK 



CONTENTS: 

CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF STAUIONS-Tlie Stall— Fad- 
dock— Food— Diseases - Exercise— Grooming 
—Serving Mares— Amount of Service. 

CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF BROOD MARES— Getting Mares 
in Foal —Care During Pregnancy— Abortion— 
Foaling— Time When Mare is Due— In Season 
Again— Weaning Colt. 

BREAKING AND DEVELOPING OF COLTS— Care of Colt-Ed- 
ucating — Feeding — Care of Growing Feet- 
Breaking to Drive— Developing, Shoeing and 
Booting. 

MANAGEMENT OF CAMPAIGNERS— How to Keep the Race 

Horse in Condition and Keyed Up for a Race. 
CARE OF THE FEET— Hooting and Shoeing— Bonner's 

and Berry's \ iews. 
CARE OF THE HORSE IN SICKNESS-Some Brief, Simple 

Rules and Remedies. 
GAITING ANO BALANCING— Correction of Faulty Gaits, 

etc. 

ANIMAL TAMING AND TRAINING— Methods Employed by 
Gentry In Overcoming Wild lustiucts of the 
Horse and Teaching Him to Learn. 

STATISTICS— Championship Records of every class 
—Leading Sires of U:30 speed— Time of Fastest 
Miles by Quarters— List of High Priced Horses 
—List of Horse Associations and Registers- 
List of Horse Journals - List of Books on the 
Horse— Period of Gestation Table, etc. 

AMERICAN TROTTING RULES— The Complete Rules gov- 
erning Harness Racing with Index, Officially 
Signed by Secretary W. H. Knight. 

USEFUL INFORMATION - Rules for Ad mission to Stand- 
ard Registers Rules for Laying out Tracks- 
Treatment of Horse's Teeth— How to Groom a 
Horse— About Clipping Horses— To start a 
Balky Horse -Where to Buy Specialties for 
Horsemen, etc. 

a o . f c- / Pa P er Cover 50c 
PH I Ot | Leatherette Cover SI 

Address BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

36 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points, 
Standard, Care, 
Training Etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The Instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
to other breeds as well as to Cockers, and It la a 
useful book for the dog owner. Tells how to 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE 15V THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAIM FPANCISCO CAL. 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



T 
I 



SHE 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, tbe most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pawlflo Coast, ai.ooii gradu- 
ates; 80 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 800 students 
annually placed In positions. Send for catalogue. 

E. P. HEALD, President. 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



(IREAT DANES. 



C'RKAT DANE PUPS (BLUEBEARD-MAUD 
VT S.) for sale; eight weeks old. O. BERG- 
STEN. Center-street Station, Oakland. 

GORDON BETTERS. 

T?OR SALE— PUPPY AND BROKEN DOGS 
L BEO. H STONE. Box 12. Fresno. Cal. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 

"HOWARD SHORTHORNS' — QUINTO 
HEKD— 77 premiums. California State Fairs 
1902-3-4. Registered cattle of beef and milking 
families for sale. Write us what you want. 
Howard Cattle Co , 206 Sansome Street, San 
Franolsco. 

PETER 9AXE & SON, Llok House, 8. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Shesp, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited. 

HOL8TEINS — BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at State and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter contest slnoe 1885 In 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F. 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Franclsoo. 

JERSEYS, HOL8TKIN8 AND DURHAMS. 
Dairy Stook speolally. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co.. I.os Angeles 
Oil. 



VETERINARY. 



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at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
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LAFLIN & RAND BRANDS 

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who used 

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LAFLIN & RAND BRANDS 

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VOL.. XLVI1I. No. 6. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1906. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A TEAR 




ROAD TEAM OWNED BY MR. MABRY McMAHAN OF SAN FRANCISCO 

RIRDC ATCHER (trotter) and I DIRECT 2:12} (pacer), both bodb of DIRECT 2:06} 



2 



[February 10, 19Wi 




RACING! 




HAWTHORNE 3:06 1-4 



BILLY BUCK 3:07 1-4 



KINNEY LOIT 8:07 3-4 



Lf I IV I IV I C\f I f\l I the fastest trotting son 
rvl 1^1 IN EL T L-vJU £-.\J I 4 of the champion sire 



Will make the Season of 1906, commencing February 1st, ending July lit, at 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, SAN JOSE, CAL. 

TERMS S10O. $50 due when mare is bred and $50 payable when mare is known to be in foal, 

BUDD DOBLE, San Jose, Cal. 



For further Information, pedigree and description address 
PHONE: JOHN 2481. 



MENDOCINO 22607 

RECORD (THREE-YEAR-OLD) 2:19^ 

Slreof Monte Carlo 2:07M (to wagon 2:08H); IdoHta (2 y. o.) 2:21«, (3y.o.)2:12. (a) 2:09^, Leonora 
2:12Vi, Polka Dot 2:14^, etc. Bay Stallion, 15.3'J hands; weight 1190 pounds; hind feet and 
ankles white; foaled April 24, 1889. Bred at Palo Alto Stock Farm. 
Sire, ELECTIONEER 125, son of Hambletonlan 10. First dam, M ANO (dam of MENDOCINO 
(3)2:19H, Electant 2:19K Morocco (3 y.o. trial 2:22) by Piedmont 904, 2:1"K; second dam, Mamie 
(dam of Mamie W (3)2:17^, Hyperion 2:215$, Memento 2:25'i, Mithra (p) 2:14^) by Hamble- 
tonlan Jr. 1882; third dam, Uilda (thoroughbred) by imp Mango. 
MENDOCINO is one of Electioneer's youngest am] best sons With very limited opportunities 
in the stud he has proven his worth by producing such racehorses as Monte Carlo and Idolita. Three 
new additions to his 2:30 list were made last season, and he now has ten standard performers. His 
foals are good size, fine lookers, bold and pure galted and easily developed. 
SERVICE FEE for Season of 1906, S75; usual return privilege. 

MCKENA 39460 

Brown Stallion; 18.2 hands; weight 1350 pounds; foaled April 11, 1900. Bred atPalo AltoStock Farm. 
Sire, MoKINNEY 8818 (record 2:11*). First dam, HELENA 2:11; 4 (damof Wildnutling 2:11)4; 
Dobbel 2:22, Hylta (trial 2:12) by Electioneer 125; second dam, Lady Ellen 2:29'/, (dam of six in 
list, including Helena 2:11H, Ellen Wood 2:14*) by Mambrino 1789; third dam, Ida May Jr. by 
Owen Dale; fourth dam, Ida May by Belmont (Williamson's). 
McKEMA has proven a remarkably sure f )al getter. He should make a great sire as he is a floe 
individual and bred right. His sire, McKinney, a game and fast racehorse and sire of game and 
fast racehorses. His dam, Helena, one of the fastest and gamest daughters of Electioneer, the 
greatest sire of trotters the world has yet known. His second dam, Lady Ellen, was one of the best 
of her day, and as well as her daughter Helena is a great broodmare. 

SERVICE FEE for Season of 1906, 840; usual return privilege. 

MENDOCINO and McKENA will make the season at PALO ALTO STOCK FARM. Mares 
may run on pasture at $5 per month. No responsibility assumed by the Palo Alto Stock Farm for 
injury or escapes. Address all communications to 

PALO ALTO 8TOCK FARM, 
Stanford University. Santa Clara Co , Cal. 



McMURRAY 




New California Jockey Clou 
OAKLAND TRACK 

Six or More Races Each Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE 

RACES COMMENCE AT 2 P. M. SHARP 

For Special Trains stopping at the Track take 
S.P.Ferry, foot of Market Street— leave at 12, 
thereafter every twenty minutes. No smoking in 
last two cars, which are reserved for ladies and 
their escorts 

Returning, trains leave Track after fifth and 
last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



PHENOL SODIQUE 

lioals 
gfl| SORES, CUTS 
, and BITES 



McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 
«3-Address for printed matter and prices 

W. J. Kenney 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 




ON 

Man and Beast. 

Keep Handy for 
Accidents. 



Cures 

MANGE & SCRATCHES 
on Dogs. 

For Sale 
By All Druggists. 

Recomm naed by this 
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HANCE BROTHERS & WHITE 

Pharmaceutical Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA. 



McKinney, 2'AV/ 4 

World's Leading Sire cf Extreme Race Horse Speed. 

FEE, $500.00 

•IFees are invariably payable before mares leave the farm. No return privilege, 
but fee returned if mare fails to produce a foal. Keep, $2. per week. Our 
terms are rigidly adhered to in all cases, and we cannot deviate from them. 

McKinney is now located al the (arm, 1 miles from Cuba. 

Site Empire (Uttg IFarms, NEWYORK. 



Mention this journal 
when writing. 



MoKINNEY DIRECTOR NUTWOOD 

THE STANDARD-BRED TROTTING STALLION 

UNIMAK 40936 

y McKinney 2:11 J; dam Twenty-Third by Director 2:17; second dam Nettie 
Nutwood (dam of Hillsdale 2:15J) by Nutwood 600. 

Will Make the Season of 1906 at PALO ALTO, Cal. 

Usual return privileges or money refunded at the option of the owner of the mare. 

Terras, $40 for the Season 

To Close June 1st. 



Tlao MoK-innoy Stallion 



KENNETH C. 2:17 




, THREE "1 

J TEAK I 

| OLD 

I RECORD ) 



Sired by McKINNEY: dam MOUNTAIN 
MAID (dam of Tom Carneal 2:08H) by 
Cresco 4908 (sire of Allle Cresco 2:13, etc ); 
next dam by Cloud. 

Will make the Season of 1906 at 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 

KENNETH C. was one of the fastest of an 
exceptionally good lot of three-year-olds that 
raced In California in 1905. He Is a splendid 
individual, has size, style and quality, and 
the grandsons and granddaughters of McKin- 
ney through Kenneth C. will be equal to any 
in the land. 



Terms 



(S30 for the Season, 
j 815 for Single Service. 



Address 



8. K [TKKFRV, Pleasanton. 



Address or apply to 



Exoellent Pasturage at Reasonable Rates. No 
barbed wire. Bast of care taken of Mares, Id 
any manner Owners may desire. 

CAPT. C. H. WILLIAMS, 

Box 151, PALO ALTO, CAL. 

WAYLAND W. 22516. Record 2:12|. 

One ofjhe Leading Sires of 2:10 Performers of 1905. 

Sire of Bolivar 2:06%, leading: money earning pacer of season 1905. Sire of 
Morosco 2.12, highest class trotter on California circuit in 1904. Wayland W. is 
by Arthur Wilkes 2:28, dam Lettie (dam of Wayland W. 2:12%, Welcome 2:10%, 
Maud Singleton 2:28) by Wayland Forrest. Although Wavland W. has never been 
mated with mares by Electioneer, Director, Nutwood. Sultan, Stamboul, Anteeo or 
any of our great sires, he is the sire of Bolivar 2:06%, Nellie R. 2:10, Arthur W. 
2:11%, Morosco 2:12. John A. 2.12%, Forrest W. 2:14%, Leland W. 2:16, Al Sandy 
2:19%, Maud Sears 2:21, Bonita Wilkes 2:26%. Wayland W. will make the 
Season of 1906 at SANTA ROSA, at McGregor & Hocklns' Stables. 

W. C. HSLMAN. Owner. 

Terms $40 for the Season. Pasture $3.00 per month. 



MONTEREY 2\09 1-4 



Reg. No. 
31706 

(Sire or IRISH 2:08^, Fastest Four-Year-Old Pacer of 1904). 
By SIDNEY (grandsire of Lou Dillon l:58i4); dam, HATTIE (also damof Montana 2:16) by 
Commodore Belmont 4340. MONTEREY 2:09H stands 15.3 hands, weighs 1200 lbs. and Is one of the 
finest individuals on this Coast. FEE, »50 for the Season. 

V/ S~\ C r" R /l I T" C~ Br MONTEREY 2:09^. _ 
YUOL.IVII I t- Dam, LEAP TEAK 2:26 (full sister to Iago 2:11) by Tempest 1881, 

son of Almont 33. ... 
YOSEMITE is a very high-class young trotter, and as he will be trained this year ne win De 
allowed to serve only six ohoice bred mares FEE, »25 for the Season. 

Will make the Season at SAN LORENZO and ALAMEDA. 

I have leased a fine, roomy barn with 14 large box stalls on Sherman street, four blocks from the 
raoe track, Alameda, and am prepared to do public training. Would like to get two good trotters 
and a promising three-year-old to prepare for the races this season. 

For particulars call or address 

PETER J. WILLIAMS, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

Write for prices. Breeder and 
SPORTSMAN, 36 Geary Street, San Franolsoo, Cal. 



February 10, 1906] 



8 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 



Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICE 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 447. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



Termi-One Tear S3, Six Months SI. 75. Three Months St 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered 
letter addressed to F. W. Kklley, 36 Geary St., San Franclsoo, 
California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guar- 
antee of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, February 10, 1906 



Stallions Advertised. 



TROTTING BRED. 

BONNIE DIRECT 2:0514.. C. L. Griffith, Pleasanton, Cal. 

BON VOYAGE 2:12% Ted Hayes, Pleasanton, Cal. 

CONSTRUCTOR 39569 James Smith, Vallejo, Cal. 

GEN. J. B. FRISBIE Thos. Smith, Vallejo, Cal. 

GRECO Chas. De Ryder, Pleasanton, Cal. 

HIGHLAND Ted Hayes, Pleasanton, Cal. 

I DIRECT 2:12% Dan Lieginger, San Francisco, Cal. 

IRAN ALTO 2:12% H. S. Hogoboom, Woodland, Cal. 

IZALCO H. Delaney, Pleasanton, Cal. 

KINNEY LOU 2:07% Budd Doble, San Jose 

KENNETH C. 2:17 S. K. Trefry, Pleasanton, Cal. 

McKINNEY 2.11% Empire City Farms, Cuba, N. Y. 

MAMBRINO CHIEF JR. 11622, Thos. Smith, Vallejo, Cal. 

MENDOCINO 2:19% Palo Alto Stock Farm, Cal. 

McKENA 39460 Palo Alto Stock Farm, Cal. 

MONTEREY 2:09%. . .P. J. Williams, San Lorenzo, Cal. 

NEAREST .2.22% T. W. Barstow, San Jose, Cal. 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16% 

_. Martin Carter, Irvington, Cal. 

NUSHAGAK 25939 C. A. Spencer, Woodland, Cal. 

PRINCE ANSEL 2:20%.. C. A. Spencer, Woodland, Cal. 

R. AMBUSH 2:14% G. W. Bonnell, Redlands, Cal. 

SIDMOOR 2:17% John Ott, Pacheco, Cal. 

STAR POINTER 1:59% 

. . . .- Chas. De Ryder, Pleasanton, Cal. 

T. C. 2:30 Geo. T. Algeo, Alameda, Cal. 

TOM SMITH 2:13% C. A. Spencer, Woodland, Cal. 

UNIMAK 40936. . .Capt. C. H. Williams, Palo Alto, Cal. 
WAYLAND W. 2:12%.. W. C. Helman, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

YOSEMITE P. J. Williams, San Lorenzo, Cal. 

ZOLOCK 2:05% H. Delaney, Pleasanton, Cal. 

•SOMBRO 2:11 Geo. T. Beckers, Los Angeles, Cal. 

HACKNEYS. 

GREEN'S RUFUS Bay wood Stud, San Mateo, Cal. 

SQUIRE OF CHESTER. .Toghill Stud, Menlo Park, Cal. 

California Stake Payments Due in 1906. 



Pacific Breeders' Futurity Stakes. 

(Payments should be made to F. W. Kelley, secre- 
tary, 36 Geary street, San Francisco.) 

Stake 3 - $6000, foals of 1903— $10 due April 1, 
1906, and starting payment of $50 on three-year-old 
trotters and $35 on three-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No. 4, $6000, foals of 1904— $10 due March 1, 
1906, and starting payment of $35 on two-year-old 
trotters and $25 on two-year-old pacers ten days be- 
fore the meeting. 

Stake No. 6, $7000, foals of 1906— $5 due May 1, 
1906, and $5 due October 1, 1906. 

Stanford Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Stanford Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— $10 due June 
1, 1906, and starting payment of $20 ten days before 
State Fair opens. 

Stanford Stake of 1907, foals of 1904— $10 due June 
1, 1906. 

Occident Stake. 

(Payments should be made to Albert Lindley, sec- 
retary, Sacramento.) 

Occident Stake of 1906, foals of 1903— Starting pay- 
ment of $50 due 30 days before the race. 

o 

A CUSTOM that has prevailed in the Eastern and 
Middle States for many years, and has recently be- 
come very popular on this coast, is for a number of 
farmers and horse breeders to associate themselves 
together in a Joint stock company and purchase a 
stallion to which their own mares will be bred, the 
horse also standing for public service. Probably a 
hundred draft and coach stallions have been sold on 
this coast by Eastern dealers during the past two 
years, and some of the horses have been good ones 
and will probably prove profitable investments. This 
is especially true of the draft breeds, although more 
than one law suit has already been started on the 
grounds that the stallions purchased were worthless 
and misrepresented to buyers. This Journal has for 
years advised the farmers of California to raise better 



and more draft stock, and the prevailing high prices 
for such, and the unlimited demand for draft animals 
is proof that our advice has been correct. We have 
written much against the practice of cross breeding 
indulged in by so many farmers, who have patronized 
a Shire horse one year, a Percheron the next, and a 
Belgian the next, and have tried to impress upon them 
the wisdom of sticking to one breed and trying to 
breed up all the time. There is a demand in Cali- 
fornia for heavy horses, and stallions that are good 
representatives of their breeds should be well pat- 
ronized this year, but we desire to particularly warn 
our readers against forming companies to buy stal- 
lions unless some of their number are expert horse- 
men who are up to the tricks which traveling horse 
sharps are such adepts at practicing. A stallion may 
be one of the best bred of his race and yet be an 
utter failure in the stud. There have been many 
instances of companies paying a long price for a 
stallion, and failing to get foals from over ten per 
cent of the mares bred to him, while other instances 
are known of stallions sold for large figures proving 
utterly impotent and worthless. The average farmer 
knows no more of the value of a long pedigree given 
with an imported horse than he knows of the cuniform 
Inscriptions on the Babylonian marbles, and the sires 
and dams so flaunted as the ancestors of the stallion 
offered them may have been conspicuous failures in 
the stud. In the sale of draft stallions fat also covers 
a multitude of sins, and the ton horse may fail to 
sire any foals at all or sire none that are heavy 
enough to rank as drafters. 

The breed of stallions that we would especially 
advise our readers to be wary of, however, are those 
of the coach breeds. These breeds, like the sport of 
roller skating, have a vogue every ten or twelve 
years, and after a sort of craze for them for a year 
or two gradually drop out of sight and are heard of 
no more. Where are the descendants of the coach 
stallions that were so numerous in California twelve 
or fifteen years ago. They equalled in looks, style 
and breeding the majority of those now being offered 
to buyers at big prices, but we can search the country 
over for their produce that have sold or are selling 
at good profitable figures. The expert horse dealer 
can take an average looking coach stallion of 1200 
pounds or over, dock his tail, pull his mane, put a 
heavy pair of shoes on him to make him step high, 
and get ten times the money for him from a company 
of farmers than the horse cost him in France or 
Germany, and yet the prices of good horses of the 
coach breeds are higher in Europe than they are here 
when purchased by experts. At every big sale of 
horses in New York, and Chicago, European buyers 
are present in large numbers looking for coach pairs 
and single horses of the type they want. These horses 
are generally sired by standard bred stallions, and the 
Europeans are willing to pay good prices for them 
here, knowing them to be worth much more on the 
other side of the Atlantic. It is really astonishing to 
think that farmers and horse breeders will form com- 
panies and pay from $2,500 to $5,000 for a so-called 
imported coach stallion and then put him at service 
at from $20 to $25 tor the season, while a good sized 
standard bred trotter could be "bought for the same 
money, would secure twice the patronage at the same 
fee, but would command much more. Nearly the en- 
standard bred trotters that could be bought for the 
same money, would secure twice the patronage at the 
same fee, but would command much more. Nearly the 
entire list of winners at the big horse shows in New 
York, Chicago and elsewhere were sired by trotting 
SEVEN — Breeder 2-7 M 

bred stallions, and nearly all the remainder by Hack- 
neys, while the French and German coach horses are 
very seldom represented. We suppose, however, that 
the craze for the coach breeds, which has been worked 
up by the dealers, will have its run, and within the 
next two or three years many of them will be scat- 
tered throughout California and Oregon at prices at 
least four times higher than can be obtained for them 
on the other side of the Rocky Mountains, while 
those who pay their hard-earned money for them 
will be sadder if not wiser men when the returns 
are all in. 

o 

HOOF BEATS. 

Mr. Richard Swasey, of Eureka, Humboldt county, 
brought a pair of handsome carriage horses to this 
city week before last, and advertised them for sale 
in the columns of this journal. They were sold this 
week for $1100 through the advertisement. These 
horses were bright bays, well bred, and well man- 
nered. They were six years old and absolutely sound. 
Such horses do not wait long for buyers. 



"Jack" Phippen has In training at San Jose a two- 
year-old colt by Searchlight 2:03%, dam Mae Gill by 
Sidney, that is a trotter. He is a grand looking colt, 
very much resembling hia great sire, and as his dam 



is a pacer it was expected he would choose the latter 
gait, but he cannot pace a step and is developing into 
a swell gaited trotter that promises to be a fast one. 
He is owned by the well known real estate dealer, 
E. W. Clayton of San Jose. Mr. Phippen has re- 
ceived two more Searchlight colts this week from 
Clement Arques of San Martin. These are also two- 
year-olds and well bred ones. The dam of one is 
Dixie by Chas. Derby 2:20, second dam Ramona, dam 
of W. Wood 2:07 by Anteeo 2:16%, and the dam of 
the other is Spry Ruth by Boodle 2:12%, next dam 
Nina B. by Electioneer. Our San Jose correspondent 
writes that Capt. Williams of Palo Alto will also soon 
send his Searchlight colt to Mr. Phippen, and there 
will be four colts by the greatest race horse that 
ever stood in California, in the hands of the greatest 
colt trainer in California. 



The mare Palo Belle 2:24% by Palo Alto 2:08%, 
first dam Belle Isle by Piedmont 2:17%, second dam 
by Hambletonian 10, and third dam by American Star 
14, has been sent to San Jose to be bred to Kinney 
Lou 2:07%. She is owned by Lieut William Price 
of San Francisco. 



Fred Cornell and the veteran trainer Dan Mizner 
from Pleasanton were in town this week and pur- 
chased one of those long shaft low seated McMurray 
carts that W. J. Kenney, 531 Valencia street, is agent 
for. They say it is the best cart on earth. 



The many friends of Dr. C. E. Farnum, the well 
known physician of this city, will regret to learn that 
in alighting from a street car some days ago he 
suffered a compound fracture of the bones of one of 
his legs, and also broke several ribs. He is at pres- 
ent confined to his bed and will be laid up for some 
time. 



Dr. Wm. B. Clowe of Walla Walla, who has been 
spending a few weeks in Los Angeles, was in San 
Francisco this week on his way home, and took a 
run up to Pleasanton Friday to see the horses. Dr. 
Clowe says there are about 200 horses at work at 
Los Angeles, among them some very promising ones 
from Washington and Oregon. He reports William 
Hogaboom as doing well at Walla Walla with his 
two stallions, Caution by Electioneer, and Teddy by 
Diablo. The get of the former he says are all well 
turned handsome horses that make fine roadsters and 
have racing speed, as the records of the past few 
years show. The colts by Teddy he speaks very 
highly of and believes they will be heard from often 
when raced. The stallion Del Norte 2:08 is a very 
popular stallion with Washington breeders, and from 
the way the youngsters by him are stepping he will 
soon have several additions to his 2.10 list which now 
comprises those two fast ones, Helen Norte 2 09% 
and Oregon Maid 2:08. The North Pacific Circuit 
promises to give the best racing that has been seen 
in the Northwest for years. 

■ — o . 

TWO SONS OF DIRECT 2:05'/ 2 . 

On the front page of this issue of the Breeder and 
Sportsman is a picture of one of the handsomest pairs 
of horses in this city. They are owned and driven by 
Mr. Mabry McMahan, the well known real estate op- 
erator, and drive together as well as a trotter and 
pacer could be expected to. Both horses are by Direct 
2:05%. The off horse, Birdcatcher, is a bay trotting 
gelding with 2:10 speed, and the near horse is the 
handsome seal-brown stallion I Direct 2.12%, one of 
the best bred of all the Directs and a very speedy 
pacer, as he has repeatedly shown miles better than 
2:10 in his races, and was only beaten a neck in 2:08 
by the famous ringer Walter K. at Santa Rosa. I Di- 
rect will be in the stud this year under the manage- 
ment of that well known horseman, Dan Lieginger of 
this city. 

While I Direct and Birdcatcher make a very hand- 
some pair of roadsters, both being capable of showing 
2:10 speed, one is a pacer and the other a trotter, and 
Mr. McMahan is ambitious to secure a mate for Bird- 
catcher if possible, believing that could he find a 
horse to match him in style, size, conformation and 
speed, he would have one of the most valuable as well 
as one of the fastest pair of trotters ever owned on 
this Coast. He therefore offers to trade I Direct for 
such a horse if one can be found. He must be a 
square trotter, able to show a 2:10 gait, and be sound 
and all right. He considers I Direct a high-class and 
valuable horse to race or use In the stud and will 
not think of trading him for anything but a first class 
animal that will mate Birdcatcher. The latter is now 
nine years old, a mahogany bay, fine style and ac- 
tion, easy on the bit, with no bad habits and afraid 
of nothing. If there are any of our readers who own 
a trotter that will mate Birdcatcher, and is as good 
as he is, and would like to own a stallion that has 
a mark of 2:12%, is by Direct 2:05%, out of the great 
brood mare Francisca, dam of three in the list, by 
Almont 33, he should correspond with Mr. McMahon, 
207 Sansome street, San Francisco. There is no bet- 
ter bred horse than I Direct. His second dam is by 
Sentinel 280, third dam by Bayard 53, fourth dam the 
famous mare Luna by Swigert's Lexington, and fifth 
dam that wonderful thoroughbred mare Eagless by 
imported Glencoe that has scores of winners of both 
trotting and running races as her descendants. The 
pedigree of I Direct on the dam's side goes back 
without a break to the 24th dam, the famous Layton 
Barb mare of English thoroughbred history. With 
such blood on his dam's side, and sired by such a pro- 
ducer as Direct 2:05%, Mr. McMahon's stallion will be 
a sire of speed if given an opportunity, something he 
has never had. He has two three-year-olds that have 
not been trained, about a half dozen yearlings, and of 
the ten mares bred to him last year all are In foal. 



[February 10, 1906 



A SENSATIONAL FILLY. 

Pleasanton track, where more harness horses are In 
training during the winter and spring months than 
at any other track in America, always furnishes a 
sensation about this time of the year. The sensation 
of 1906 is a baby pacer by Mr. W. A. Clark Jr.'s stal- 
lion Highland. It is a filly and is just eight months 
old. The precocious little miss is owned jointly by 
Mr. Clark and Ted Hayes and is the first piece of 
horseflesh either ever bred. Her dam is a mare called 
Reina del Diablo by Diablo 2:09%, and was the first 
mare bred to Highland after Mr. Clark purchased 
him. The filly is a natural born pacer — don't know 
any gait but the lateral one, and while only eight 
months old stepped out like a campaigner the first 
time she was ever hitched to anything which was a 
few weeks ago, and on Monday last astonished every- 
one by pacing a quarter in 44 seconds and doing it 
so easily and so handily that she did not seem to 
realize she was doing anything out of the ordinary. 
She is level headed, perfectly gaited and one of the 
sweetest dispositioned youngsters- ever seen on the 
Pleasanton track. 

She has made a good start for Highland (who will 
be in the stud at Pleasanton this year) as a sire, and 
if his produce are all like her. he will have a promi- 
nent place In the Great Table before he is much 
older. Highland is admitted by all horsemen to be 
one of the best gaited and most determined of trot- 
ters. He has a trial of 2:12, and is such a magni- 
ficent individual and so well bred, that no doubt can 
be entertained of his ability to sire speed of a high 
order. He is coal black, with one white hind ankle, 
stands 16 hands and weighs 1200 pounds. In short 
he Is just about the ideal for a trotting bred sire. 
His breeding is unsurpassed. His sire Is Expresso 
29,199, a half brother to that great trotting three- 
year-old Expressive 2:12%. Expresso was by Ad- 
vertiser 2:15%, out of the great brood mare Esther, 
dam of three in the list. Highland's dam is Alpha 
2:23%, dam of three standard performers, three pro- 
ducing sons and two producing daughters. The 
grandam of Highland is that famous mare. Jessie 
Pepper, one of the greatest brood mares that ever 
lived. She produced two standard performers, three 
of her sons are sires of standard speed and no less 
than seven of her daughters have produced trotters 
with records. 

Bred in these lines Highland is as certain to pro- 
duce speed as night is to follow day, and breeders can 
make no mistake in sending good mares to him. He 
will be in the stud at Pleasanton at $25 the season. 
By addressing Ted Hayes at Pleasanton any further 
particulars In regard to shipping and care of mares, 
etc , will be furnished. 

Highland was bred to a few choice mares last year 
that were the property of Mr. Clark. Such mares as 
Hazel Wilkes 2:11%, She 2:12%, Patty D. 2:12%, 
and others were among them and all are now in foal. 
When these foals appear, they will be carefully 
raised, trained and given race records if possible, so 
that outsiders who have colts by Highland will thus 
get the benefit. There is nothing like breeding to a 
horse whose get are trained and raced by the owner. 

o 

LOS ANGELES DRIVING CLUB. 

The Los Angeles Driving Club held its monthly 
matinee at Agricultural Park January 27th, and was 
well attended. The card was a good one. the day 
all that could be desired and the track in excellent 
condition, while the events were run off in good or- 
der, the Seventh Regiment band played. 

The event of the day was the fourth, in which Wel- 
come Mc, owned and driven by Thomas Hughes, paced 
a mile to a wagon against time in 2:11%. Welcome 
Mc also has a previous matinee record of 2:08% to 
a sulky. 

The third race, a 2:20 pace, was an exceptionally 
good one, the cup lying between Lohengrin, driven 
by his owner, Dr. William Dodd. and Connors, owned 
and driven by G. A. Pounder; but Dodd's horse proved 
the best of the other starters and won the heats in 
good time, the first being made in 2.14%. In the 2:25 
trot Abe Miller, owned and driven by M. B. Mosher, 
proved himself the fastest of a good bunch and won 
the event. 

Summary: 

2:30 pace, mile heats, best two in three — Star Mason 
won, Nuttie second, Barney third. Time, 2:23%, 
2:29. 

2:25 trot, mile heats, best two in three — Abe Miller 
won, George Anderson second, Don Z. third. Time, 

2:22, 2:24%. 

2:20 pace, mile heats, best two in three — Lohengrin 
won, Connors second, Harry H. third, Athlo fourth. 
Time, 2:21%, 2.14%. 

Against time to a wagon — Welcome Mc, 2:17 and 
2:11%. 

2:20 trot, mile heats, best two in three — Zombretta 
won, Bur Nut second. (Two starters). Time, 2:26, 
2:25. 

2:25 pace, mile heats, best two in three — Zollle won. 
Siegfried second, Laura G. third. Time, 2:21% and 
2:23. 

o 1 

A CHALLENGE. 



At the Pleasanton race track on Sunday, February 
4th, Mr. John O'Keefe of San Francisco, drove his 
five-year-old pacing Ally Centereye a mile in 2:13%, 
last half in 1:04, and last quarter in 30% seconds. Mr. 
O'Keefe now claims the fastest mare driven by an 
amateur for 1906, and challenges any five-year-old 
pacing colt, gelding or filly to a match race over the 
Pleasanton track on any Sunday, horses to be green 
and without records, and owners, who must be ama- 
teurs, to drive. 



ZOMBRO 2:11 AT LOS ANGELES. 

Geo. T. Beckers, owner of Zombro 2:11, the greatest 
three-year-old ever raced on the Pacific Coast, and 
sire of Zephyr 2:07% and ten more In the list, writes 
us that this noted horse will make the season of 
1906 at Los Angeles at $50 for the season, which an- 
nouncement will be of interest to a large number of 
the leading breeders of California. Full value for 
the money is obtained by every person who secures a 
Zombro foal, even though the price of service fee 
were many times the low figure asked by Mr. Beck- 
ers, as the Zombros sell for good figures at any time. 
Every few weeks one hears of a Zombro being sold 
and in every instance the price is a good one. There 
is good money in raising them as there is in raising 
anything that is in strong demand. 

Zombro is distinguished in many ways. He was 
the greatest colt trotter ever raced in California. He 
has more blue ribbons and gold medals for wins in 
the show ring than any stallion in the State, and his 
list of standard performers is not only headed by the 
fastest ever sired by a son of McKinney, but it con- 
tains more names than the lists of all other sons of 
McKinney combined. His daughter Zephyr took a 
race record of 2:07% trotting on the grand circuit 
last year and won over $8,000. His son Charlie T. 
2.13% won more money on the California circuit last 
year than any trotter raced in class races. In these 
days speed and money talk. 

Down at Los Angeles the young Zombros are th* 
talk of the track. Mr. Samuel Ellmore, the well known 
capitalist of Astoria, Oregon, has a Zombro gelding 
that is now four years old. He is called Zomont, and 
is out of a Altamont mare. Will Durfee Is training 
him and the gelding is considered about the best 
green prospect in Southern California. Zomont 
worked a mile last Wednesday in 2:16, last half in 
1:06. 

Ezra Tilden has a fine bunch of youngsters there, 
all of which are Zombros. He has four belonging to 
L. H. Todhunter of Sacramento, all of which are trot- 
ters. They have all worked miles better than 2:30. 
Two young stallions which will be three years old in 
May are entered in all the stakes to be trotted on 
the Coast this year. One of them, Gerald G, is out 
of a Sidney mare and has worked a half in 1:09, and 
a quarter in 33% seconds. The other is called Hooli- 
gan. He is out of a mare by Sliver Bow and has 
stepped a half in 1:10% and a quarter in 34 seconds. 
Billy Emerson, a four-year-old, and Zomitelia, the 
same age, stepped quarters in 33% seconds this week. 
This is a fine showing for four youngsters to make, 
all by the same sire, owned by the same man and in 
the same stable. Zombowyette 2:16% is also there 
and in good shape after her Arizona races. She also 
belongs to Mr. Todhunter and many consider her 
about the best trotter and the gamest in her class on 
this Coast. 

Up at Pleasanton there are a few Zombros that are 
right up in the limelight all the time, and whereve* 
the get of Zombro are in training they are considered 
fast enough to cause lots of talk. 

Attention is called to the new advertisement of 
Zombro which appears in this issue. 

FOUND THE MISSING LINK. 

New York, Jan 23. — At last the chain of equine 
evolution is complete. After years of search, and 
just when all hope of success had been abandoned, 
the American Museum of Natural History, New York, 
has been rewarded by the discovery of remains of the 
'mountain horse," or Orohippus. This discovery fills 
in the last gap in the record which science has long 
endeavored to make perfect. 

The museum began its explorations in 1901 under 
the direction of Professor Henry F. Osborn. curator 
of the Department of Vertebrate Paleontology, with 
a trip to the Big Horn Basin of Northern Wyoming 
The expenses were defrayed from a fund contributed 
by the late William C. Whitney. At his death these 
special explorations had to cease, the hunt for fossil 
horses- is now carried on in conjunction with that 
for other fossil animals, until some equally public- 
spirited horse lover comes forward to continue it 
distinctively. 

The locality around Fort Bridger, Wyoming, was 
carefully searched for fossils, but particularly for the 
"mountain horse," fragments of which had been found 
and named by Professor Marsh in 1872. Parties sent 
out by the American Museum visited this region in 
1893 and 1895, and from 1903 to 1905, but in spite of 
the most indefatigable efforts the Orohippus eluded 
the searchers. It has begun to look as though the 
attempt to locate his skeleton would have to be given 
up as hopeless when on the very last day of the final 
expedition of 1905, just when the party was about to 
return, the long-looked for remains were unearthed. 
These consisted of the skull, backbone, limbs and 
other parts of the skeleton of the very stage wanted. 

The find has not been publicly announced here- 
tofore, and it will be some time before the museum 
has ready its exhibit, showing every stage of horse 
evolution, beginning when the ancestors of the horse 
of to-day were about the size of an Irish terrier. The 
museum has already classified the fossils of the 
horse previously found in various localties in the 
western part of the United States, and will thus be 
able now to place before the public a complete ocular 
record of equine evolution fro mthe early days of 
the Eocene period, estimated at three million years 
ago. down to the present time. 

The museum's latest discovery is of the greatest 
Importance, not only because It will make these rec- 
ords more complete, but also because it may lead to 
the verification of the theory that the horse originated 
in this country. Professor Osborn will make a thor- 
ough examination of these remains and his conclu- 
sions are awaited with a great deal of Interest. 



NEWS FROM THE NORTH. 



(Portland Rural Spirit.) 

Fred Hambleton 2:26, made to high wheel sulkey 
eighteen years ago, is now doing stud duty at Aurora, 
Oregon, and is owned by S. A. Miller. 

Boise, Idaho, will claim the week of October 15 to 
20 for their fair this year and will again become a 
member of the North Pacific Fair Association. 

E. Rosencrance. of Hubbard, Oregon, is the proud 
possessor of a very handsome four- year-old mar*, 
standing 16-2 and weighing 1300 pounds. She is by 
Nutwood Wilkes, out of a mare by Altamont, and 
possesses a wonderful lot of speed, besides being 
large and handsome. 

The Spokane Interstate Fair Association let a con- 
tract to build 150 feet additional grand stand on the 
north end of the present grand stand to accommodate 
the Increased attendance at each year's fairs. The 
present structure was- inadequate last year and a 
greater crowd is expected in 1906. 

S. S. Bailey of Los Angeles, will send his stallion. 
Tidal Wave 2:09, V Nutwood Wilkes, dam by Mc- 
Kinney, to Salem, Oregon, for a stud season. 

F. A. Rankin, o." Eugene, Oregon, reports the sale 
of Myra Golddust Jdam of Broadheart) by Pedro, and 
her yearling Ally by Diablo 2:09%, to John Dimmick, 
of Salem. Mr. Rankin at one time owned th».- fam 
pacer, Bessie Rankin 2:16%. 

August Erickson has sold his McKinney mare. Alma 
Mac, to Fink & Co., of this city, at a reported price 
of $750. Alma Mac's dam is Mary A. 2:30, by Alta- 
mont; second dam by Kisbar. This mare has trotted 
miles close to 2:20, but met with an accident and 
was thrown out of training. She is sound now and is 
a good green prospect 

Capt. Jones will make the season of 1906 at the 
State fair grounds near Salem, Oregon, commencing 
about March 1st. A stallion that can sire colts good 
enough to be taken to Indiana, where thousands of 
trotters are bred ought to be good enough for the 
Oregon breeders to patronize. This horse's value as * 
sire has not been duly recognized in this State In 
the past, but the show ring record of the Lewis and 
Clark fair ought to set people thinking. 

o 

SOME OF THE PRICES FOR CHAMPIONS. 

Among the first of the famous old-time trotters that 
changed hands at a high figure was Pocahontas Girl 
2:26%, this mare bringing $40,000 back in 1864. Since 
that time other trotting mares that have sold for 
big prices are Sunol 2:08%, $41,000; Maud S. 2:08%, 
the champion trotter for many years, for whom Rob- 
ert Bonner paid $40,000; Nancy Hanks 2:04, the cham- 
pion trotter of her time, that the late J. Malcolm 
Forbes paid $40,000 for; Goldsmith Maid 2:14, sold 
for $32,000, while Lady Thome 2:18%, went for $30,- 
000. The highest price ever paid for a trotter was the 
$125,000 paid by Mr. Forbes to Leland Stanford of 
California for the stallion Arion 2:07%, in 1892. Three 
years previous to that time Axtell 2:12 was sold to a 
syndicate for $105,000, and has proven a most prolific 
sire of speed. 

When the horses owned by Mr. Forbes were sold to 
close out the estate, the trotting stallion Bingen 2:06% 
went to A. H. Parker of Bedford, Mass . for $32,000, 
while last November M. W. Savage, of Minneapolis, 
Minn., paid $21,000 for Cresceus 2:02%. Other stal- 
lions that were sold for big money were Director 2:17, 
for $75,000; Red Wilkes 2:40, for $60,000; Anteeo 2:16% 
for $55,000; Bell Boy 2:19%, who met death by fire 
shortly after selling, for $51,000, the largest price ever 
realized for a harness horse at public auctiorl. Robert 
McGregor 2:17%, sire of Cresceus, sold '.for $50,000, 
as did the successful Ohio sire Wilton 2:19%, Alcolyte 
2:21, the pet of J. S. Coxey. of "Coxey army" fame, 
cost him $40,000. Other high prices secured for trot- 
ting stallions being $42,000 for Stamboul, $35,000 for 
Antevolo 2:19%, $35,000 for Dare Devil 2:09, $35,000 
for Conductor 2:14%, $31,000 for The King, and $30,- 
000 each for Jay Gould 2:21%, and Ralph Wilkes 
2:06%, and $20,000 for Directum 2:05%. Cresceus, 
with the fastest record of all, sold for $21,000. 

Quite a number of geldings have sold for high fig- 
ures. Rarus 2:13%, and Dexter 2:17%, both cham- 
pions in their day, selling for $36,000 and $35,000, re- 
spectively. Prince Wilkes 2:14% sold for $30,000 in 
1899, while The Abbott 2:03% brought $26,000 under 
the hammer five years since. E. E. Smathers paid 
$40,000 for Major Delmar 1:59%, while C. K. G. Bil- 
lings secured a bargain when he paid $12,500 at auc- 
tion for the champion Lou Dillon 1:58%. The top 
price paid for a pacer is $60,000, the amount M. W. 
Savage is said to have paid for the champion Dan 
Patch 1:55%. 

■ — o ( 

Joe Gahagan of Toledo, O., has purchased from Mel 
Crews of Areola, III., the fast young trotting stallion 
Central G. (3) 2:16% by A. J. Giick 2:10%, out of a 
full sister to Baradian 2:14% by Barada, second dam 
Dimpi C. by Gambetta Wilkes. The price paid was 
$3500. Central G. took his record in the second heat 
of a winning five heat race at Springfield, 111., last 
season and Mr. Gahagan looks for him to be a good 
race horse this season. 

o 

Senator Bailey of Texas, who retired from the racing 
and breeding industry, as will be remembered, is now 
deep in the game. His stable of trotters is the largest 
at Lexington. His string for the present Includes a 
trio of three-year-olds, nine two-year-olds and eleven 
yearlings, all by Prodigal 2:16, and it constitutes the 
biggest string of youngsters by one sire ever in train- 
ing over the Lexington track. 

o 

An advertiser offers a business for sale that clears 
$5000 yearly. Just the thing for a horseman. 



February 10, 19C6] 



|| NOTES AND NEWS. 



Zolock 2:05V* and his son, Izalco, will make the 
season at Pleasanton race track instead of San Jose. 
When you go to Pleasanton don't fail to call on Henry 
Delaney and have him show you this great horse, the 
fastest entire son of McKinney. 



The M.dw.nter sale of the Faslg-TIpton Company Diablo's brother, Arner 2:17% was shinned to Phi™ 

opened in New York on January 29th. Among the from Pleasanton last week and win make tvJ .? 

hor.es sold were the following: Fantasy 2:06 by Of 1906 at the firafnL^pto^ tt toT ho M ?L«^ro 

Chimes. 16 years old, $1,000; Mush 2:08%. by Lottery of R U u e county are wise V h *v »m L ♦ , breeders 

Ticket. $850; Crown Prince, no record, by Dexte^ of Oha^. Derby liberally Arner is not°onlv ^ m S ° n 

Prince-Miss Va.ensin, $800: Star Ha. 2:04%, 12 years, nificent individual royally bleTand ve^ ^Ll buT h^ 




A payment of $10 each is due March 1st on all two- 
year-olds entered in Pacific Breeders' Futurity No. 
4, for foals of 1904. This stake has a guaranteed value 
of $6000, and to keep your entries eligible to any of 
the divisions this payment must be made on or before 
Thursday, March 1st, 1906. Don't forget this. 



The meeting at Woodland this year, which will be 
held during the week just prior to the State Fair, 
will be managed by Mr. Alex. Brown, proprietor of 
the Woodland Stock Farm, and his able superinten- 
dent, C. A. Spencer. Both gentlemen are thorough 
horsemen, as well as first class business men, and 
they will have the cordial and hearty support of the 
citizens of Woodland and Yolo county and the patron- 
age and aid of every horseman who has trotters or 
pacers to race in California. 



$550; The Native, two-year-old colt by Moko, $2,100. 
Sara Patch, black filly, four years, by Joe Patchen, 
$3,000. The twenty head consigned by the Parkway 
Farm, Goshen, N. Y., the estate of the late Senator 
McCarthy, sold at a higher average than any one con- 
signment from a breeding farm In the history of the 
Fasig-Tipton Co. The colts by Jce Patchen 2:01% 
averaged over $1,000, while the total of twenty head 
sold for $15,230, or an average of $761.50. a record of 
its kind. 



Sherman Reams of Suisun Valley, Solano county, 
has purchased the stallion Comet Wilkes 2:21 and 
will use him in the stud this year. 

Tom James of Des Moines, Iowa, has sent his five- 
year-old filly, Fashoda 2.24% by Barondale, to Ed 
Geers at Memphis, who will train and race her this 
year if she comes up to expectations. Those who 
visited the San Jose track when Mr. James had 
Fashoda and Barondale there during the seasons of 



1903 and 1904 will recall this filly as a very hleh cImh 
Ten outside mares were booked to Mr. W. A. Clark one in looks and way of going. 



Jr.'s stallion Bon Voyage (3) 2:12% within three days 
after the horse reached Pleasanton, and Ted Hayes 




The new race track which is building at Exeter, 
near Visalia, will be completed in time to begin train 



as a weanling in 1892, at the Hobart sale in New 



It is stated that an epidemic of glanders has broken York, 
out among the horses belonging to the four troops of 

the Fourteenth United States Cavalry stationed at The Hudson and Mohawk Valley Circuit of New 



ing horses over it by May 1st, and arrangements are Monterey. The Government veterinary found twenty- York State has decided on the five heat plan for ft* 
being made to hold a meeting in the fall. About forty e ' sht horses afflicted with the dread disease, which harness races this year No race is tn ho i™„o,. ,.,„' 

. .. _ .... n-ara rtr t .l,.., An *i „n , . _ civ-g is lu ut; lUIltrer 111311 



stalls wil be erected immediately. Mr. George 
Kirkham will send all his horses, about twenty 
number, there to train. 



M. 
in 



aTed 6 rd'nuVrantine^" ^ ^ Were vaccl - J? h * ats ' »° *°»e has" won three bS? SSI 

ated and quarantined. five have been decided, first money will go to the 

horse that stands best in the summary. 



One of the largest sales of trotting horses ever held 
in Australia was that necessitated by the breaking up 
of the late Mr. John Robertson's stud, which took 
place last December. There was an attendance of 
some five hundred spectators, including would-be buy- 
ers from most of the other States, and representatives 
from this colony. Considering that the majority of 



George Stickle of Angels, Cal., is proudly contem- 
plating a young trotter of his own breeding, every 
time he looks over his colts in the pasture, and thinks 
he has one that will make all the horsemen "sit up 
and take notice" when he is old enough to train. At 
a sale of horses from the Santa Rosa Stock Farm held 
in this city in 1903, Mr. Stickle purchased a filly by 
Sidney Dillon out of the mare Maud (dam of Maudie 
2:24% and Legation 2:23%) by Nutwood. This filly is 
an own sister to Custer, the phenomenal pacer owned 
by Mr. J. C. Adams of Phoenix. Arizona. Mr. Stickle 
bred this filly in 1904 to his grandly bred stallion 
Stickle, son of Silver Bow 2.16 and Grace, dam of 
Daedalion, 2:08%, etc., by Buccaneer. In 1905 the 
mare foaled a colt that Mr. Stickle says he was not 
greatly prepossessed with at first, but is now not only 
a fine looking youngster but a trotter if there ever was 

one. He expects great things from him when he gets three-year-old pacer and a two-year-old trotter, that 
old enough to wear a harness, and if there is any- are said to show Grand Circuit form, 
thing in blood lines and precocity he is justified in 
all his anticipations. Mr. Stickle also owns a colt 
by Sidney Dillon out of a Silver Bow mare that looks 
like something much better than the average. 



The Breeder and Sportsman Stallion Service Book 
just from the press, is the newest and best service 
book that has been gotten up. Horsemen who have 
seen it pronounce it the best and the most convenient 
hook of the kind ever brought to their notice. It is 

the horses offered were in rather poor condition," th'e" sZ'VcJ^t^Tl^TV' *»* 1 °* COnvenie » t 
prices realised were of a satisfactory nature. Arnong p ocket. It sells at one dollar, 

those that came in for the most spirited competition 



Dick Abies, who is training at the Santa Rosa track 
has three colt trotters in his stable that he purchased 
at the Rosedale Farm sale. They are all by Wash- 
ington McKinney out o